[Systematic review] What is the effect of additional physiotherapy on sitting balance following stroke compared to standard physiotherapy treatment

Abstract

Background:

Sitting balance dysfunction is commonly experienced following stroke. Physiotherapists utilize interventions to address this problem but it is unclear whether treatment type, target or practice intensity may affect outcomes.

Objective:

To compare the effects of standard physiotherapy to standard physiotherapy plus an additional physiotherapy treatment after stroke.

Data Sources:

The databases of Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase, Ovid Medline, AMED, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) up to December 2014 were searched.

Study Selection:

Randomized controlled trials in English reported in peer-reviewed journals regarding the effect of additional physiotherapy on sitting balance were retrieved.

Data Extraction:

The PEDro scale was used to assess study quality.

Results:

Eleven studies met inclusion criteria. Nine targeted the ICF (International Classification of Function, Disability and Health) domain of Activity. The Trunk control test (TCT) was used as a primary outcome measure in five studies, and the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) was used in four. There was a significant effect (mean difference = 1.67, 95% CI = 0.54–2.80) favoring intervention, as measured by the TIS. There was no evidence to support the effect of additional treatment on sitting balance as measured by the TCT (mean difference = − 1.53, 95% CI = − 9.37 to 6.32).

Conclusion:

The current evidence supports strategies that target deficits at the activity level and increase total treatment time. The TIS is most responsive as a measure of treatment efficacy. Further research is required using recommended outcome measures to facilitate generation of a minimum data set and data pooling.

via Maney Online – Maney Publishing.

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