[ARTICLE] When Does Return of Voluntary Finger Extension Occur Post-Stroke? A Prospective Cohort Study – Full Text

Abstract

Objectives: Patients without voluntary finger extension early post-stroke are suggested to have a poor prognosis for regaining upper limb capacity at 6 months. Despite this poor prognosis, a number of patients do regain upper limb capacity. We aimed to determine the time window for return of voluntary finger extension during motor recovery and identify clinical characteristics of patients who, despite an initially poor prognosis, show upper limb capacity at 6 months post-stroke.

Methods: Survival analysis was used to assess the time window for return of voluntary finger extension (Fugl-Meyer Assessment hand sub item finger extension≥1). A cut-off of ≥10 points on the Action Research Arm Test was used to define return of some upper limb capacity (i.e. ability to pick up a small object). Probabilities for regaining upper limb capacity at 6 months post-stroke were determined with multivariable logistic regression analysis using patient characteristics.

Results: 45 of the 100 patients without voluntary finger extension at 8 ± 4 days post-stroke achieved an Action Research Arm Test score of ≥10 points at 6 months. The median time for regaining voluntary finger extension for these recoverers was 4 weeks (lower and upper percentile respectively 2 and 8 weeks). The median time to return of VFE was not reached for the whole group (N = 100). Patients who had moderate to good lower limb function (Motricity Index leg≥35 points), no visuospatial neglect (single-letter cancellation test asymmetry between the contralesional and ipsilesional sides of <2 omissions) and sufficient somatosensory function (Erasmus MC modified Nottingham Sensory Assessment≥33 points) had a 0.94 probability of regaining upper limb capacity at 6 months post-stroke.

Conclusions: We recommend weekly monitoring of voluntary finger extension within the first 4 weeks post-stroke and preferably up to 8 weeks. Patients with paresis mainly restricted to the upper limb, no visuospatial neglect and sufficient somatosensory function are likely to show at least some return of upper limb capacity at 6 months post-stroke.

Introduction

 

Voluntary finger extension (VFE) is an important early predictor of recovery of upper limb capacity at 6 months post-stroke[1;2]. Patients without VFE within the first days post-stroke have been suggested to have a poor prognosis for regaining some upper limb capacity at 6 months[13]. Absence of VFE reflects the loss of functional corticospinal tract integrity, acknowledging that the hand muscles are almost solely innervated by contralateral corticospinal pathways[4]. Indirect bilateral innervation of the hand muscles by the reticulospinal tract may also contribute to hand motor control after stroke[5]. However, it remains unclear if the reticulospinal system can influence the digital extensor muscles of the paretic hand[6].

 

Despite an initially poor prognosis, some patients without VFE within the first days after stroke do regain upper limb capacity at 6 months[2]. In view of the lack of evidence-based therapies for patients without VFE[7;8], this return of VFE seems most likely to be driven by spontaneous neurobiological processes such as alleviation of diaschisis[9]. Unfortunately, the clinical characteristics as well as the optimal time window for recovery of VFE are unknown, due to lack of prospective cohort studies in which patients are assessed serially at fixed times post-stroke[10;11]. More knowledge regarding this time window is important for future prognostic algorithm development. Up till now, the most optimal timing and added value of neurophysiological and neuroimaging measurements with respect to clinical measurements like VFE are unclear.

 

The aims of the present study were therefore (1) to determine the clinical time window for return of VFE in ischemic stroke patients without VFE in the first days post-stroke, and (2) to identify clinical characteristics for the return of some upper limb capacity in these patients within the first 6 months after stroke. We hypothesized that return of VFE would occur within the purported time window of spontaneous neurobiological recovery between 0 and 10 weeks after stroke onset[10;12]. We also hypothesized that patients with lesions affecting upper limb function who exhibit no other neurological impairments such as visuospatial neglect and somatosensory dysfunction would have a high probability of regaining some upper limb capacity at 6 months[1315].

Continue —> PLOS ONE: When Does Return of Voluntary Finger Extension Occur Post-Stroke? A Prospective Cohort Study

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