[Abstract] Association between seven days per week rehabilitation and functional recovery of acute stroke patients: A retrospective cohort study based on Japan Rehabilitation Database 

Abstract

Objective

To test the hypothesis that functional outcome of stroke patients who receive seven days per week rehabilitation (7DWR) is generally better than that of similar patients who undergo five to six days per week rehabilitation.

Design

A retrospective cohort study.

Setting

14 acute hospitals across Japan.

Participants

From the Japan Rehabilitation Database, which includes data on 8,033 acute stroke patients collected between January 2005 and December 2013, we included 3,072 stroke patients who were admitted to the above hospitals and received 7DWR.

Intervention

7DWR was defined as rehabilitation therapy administrated by physical or occupational therapist, on every weekday, Saturday and Sunday.

Main Outcome Measures

Favorable functional independence in daily living defined as modified Rankin scale 0-2 at the time of discharge.

Results

A total of 1,075 (35.0%) patients received 7DWR. Univariate analysis demonstrated significant difference in favorable functional recovery between the 7DWR group and control group (43.3% vs 37.6%, p=0.002). Multivariate logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equations method showed that 7DWR was independently associated with favorable functional recovery.

Conclusions

Our cohort analysis demonstrated that 7DWR in early rehabilitation for acute stroke patients can lead to functional recovery

Source: Association between seven days per week rehabilitation and functional recovery of acute stroke patients: A retrospective cohort study based on Japan Rehabilitation Database – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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