[ARTICLE] Effectiveness of a structured sexual rehabilitation programme following stroke: A randomized controlled trial – Full Text

Abstract

Background: Sexual activity is an integral part of life; it is important to address sexual health after stroke, but this is often poorly done.

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a structured sexual rehabilitation programme compared with written information alone regarding sexual and psychological functioning (anxiety, depression, stress), functional independence and quality of life in an Australian stroke cohort.

Methods: A total of 68 participants were randomized to a structured sexual rehabilitation programme (treatment group; n = 35) or to written information alone (control group; n = 33). Outcome measures included: Sexual Functioning Questionnaire Short Form; Depression, Anxiety Stress Scale; Functional Independence Measure, and Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale-39 Generic. Assessments were performed at baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months after the intervention. Participant’s preferences regarding how they would like to receive information, who from, and how frequently, were collected at baseline.

Results: There was no difference between groups for any outcome measures. Half of the participants (51%) wished to receive information and were divided equally into preferring written information vs face-to-face counselling, with the majority (54%) preferring information after discharge from an inpatient setting.

Conclusion: Provision of written information alone appears to be as effective as a 30-min individualized sexual rehabilitation programme in an inpatient setting. Further research is needed regarding longer term outcomes and outpatient settings.

Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability (1). Sexual dysfunction is common after stroke, and has multifactorial causes: damage to the brain (causing decline in sexual desire/interest and coital frequency for both sexes, decline in vaginal lubrication and orgasm in females, and in erection and ejaculation in males, and physical changes, such as hemiplegia with resulting impairment of mobility) together with medical issues, such as medications and premorbid medical conditions (diabetes, hypertension, cardiac issues) and psychological factors (fear of new stroke, loss of self-esteem, role/relationship changes) are major contributors (2–5).

Sexuality is a broad concept and may be experienced and expressed in a variety of ways; including thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviours, practices, roles, and relationships (6). Sexual activity is an integral part of life and the importance of addressing sexual health after stroke is well accepted (7). Despite this, it is common for sexuality to be poorly addressed, not just in stroke, but also in other neurological conditions, such as spina bifida (8) and spinal cord injury (9). The 2012 Australian National Stroke Audit Rehabilitation Services Report (10), which included 2,789 post-stroke patients across 111 Australian public and private hospitals, showed that only 17% of patients received information on sexuality. This is despite the opportunities provided through the staffing complement in rehabilitation settings. In practice, allied healthcare providers could have a primary or secondary role in sexual rehabilitation; they could be the sole providers of intervention or provide further intervention in their specific areas of expertise, such as physiotherapy training to optimize mobility in bed for sexual positioning, nursing education for catheter management, and dyspraxia training with speech therapy for sexual activities such as kissing. In addition, although current guidelines recommend the assessment and management of post-stroke sexual dysfunction (7), it is unclear what types of intervention (timing, content, intensity, setting) should be provided and how effective they are. The only intervention study currently available in the literature that addresses the impact of intervention on sexual activity following stroke suggests that a sexual rehabilitation intervention programme prior to hospital discharge increased sexual satisfaction and frequency of sexual activity one month post-discharge, but did not promote sexual knowledge (11). This study was conducted with culturally homogenous 40–49-year-old Korean couples and had significant methodological limitations (generalizability, pre-post design, and short follow-up). Patient’s preferences relating to sexual counselling, such as the timing of such counselling, also varied, creating further challenges for optimization of care (12, 13). Some studies show that most participants feel overwhelmed in the early adjustment period and that the best time to address sexual adjustment issues is towards the end of an acute rehabilitation hospitalization or shortly after discharge. In a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in 2014, the feasibility and importance of providing sexual rehabilitation following stroke was demonstrated; however, the “pilot” nature of the study did not allow for conclusive findings to be drawn (14).

The primary aim of this RCT was to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive structured sexual rehabilitation programme compared with written information alone, on sexual and psychological (anxiety, depression, stress) function, and on functional independence and quality of life in an Australian stroke cohort. Building on the previous pilot RCT, to our knowledge this will be the first adequately powered RCT in this area. The findings will provide evidence that may lead to improved care.

Continue —> Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine – Effectiveness of a structured sexual rehabilitation programme following stroke: A randomized controlled trial – HTML

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