[ARTICLE] The treatment methods for post-stroke visual impairment: A systematic review – Full Text

Abstract

Aim

To provide a systematic overview of interventions for stroke related visual impairments.

Method

A systematic review of the literature was conducted including randomized controlled trials, controlled trials, cohort studies, observational studies, systematic reviews, and retrospective medical note reviews. All languages were included and translation obtained. This review covers adult participants (aged 18 years or over) diagnosed with a visual impairment as a direct cause of a stroke. Studies which included mixed populations were included if over 50% of the participants had a diagnosis of stroke and were discussed separately. We searched scholarly online resources and hand searched articles and registers of published, unpublished, and ongoing trials. Search terms included a variety of MESH terms and alternatives in relation to stroke and visual conditions. Article selection was performed by two authors independently. Data were extracted by one author and verified by a second. The quality of the evidence and risk of bias was assessed using appropriate tools dependant on the type of article.

Results

Forty-nine articles (4142 subjects) were included in the review, including an overview of four Cochrane systematic reviews. Interventions appraised included those for visual field loss, ocular motility deficits, reduced central vision, and visual perceptual deficits.

Conclusion

Further high quality randomized controlled trials are required to determine the effectiveness of interventions for treating post-stroke visual impairments. For interventions which are used in practice but do not yet have an evidence base in the literature, it is imperative that these treatments be addressed and evaluated in future studies.

1 Introduction

Visual impairments following stroke may include abnormalities of central and/or peripheral vision, eye movements and a variety of visual perception problems such as inattention and agnosia. The visual problems (types of visual impairment) can be complex including ocular as well as cortical damage (Jones & Shinton, 2006; Rowe et al., 2009a). Visual impairments can have wide reaching implications on daily living, independence, and quality of life. Links with depression have also been documented in the literature (Granger, Cotter, Hamilton, & Fiedler, 1993; Nelles et al., 2001; Ramrattan et al., 2001; Tsai et al., 2003; West et al., 2002). The estimation of the overall prevalence of visual impairment is approximately 60% at the acute stage following stroke (Ali et al., 2013; Barrett et al., 2007; Clisby, 1995; Freeman & Rudge, 1987; Isaeff, Wallar, & Duncan, 1974; Rowe et al., 2009b; Rowe et al., 2013). A review of the individual prevalence figures and the recovery rates for each of the possible post-stroke visual impairments has been reported elsewhere in the literature (Hepworth et al., 2016).

In order to treat and manage visual impairments caused by stroke it is important to establish the range and effectiveness of the available treatment options. The aim of this literature review is to provide a comprehensive synthesis of the evidence relating to treatment of visual problems after stroke.

Continue —> The treatment methods for post-stroke visual impairment: A systematic review – Hanna – 2017 – Brain and Behavior – Wiley Online Library

Figure 1

Flowchart of pathway to inclusion of articles

Advertisements

, ,

  1. Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: