[WEB SITE] How It All Works – Brainworks

eRehabilitation™: The future of rehab!


One thing we know for certain is that the future of rehab is inseparable from the Internet. To be client–centred, we have to go where our clients are … and our clients are everywhere, throughout the community and all over the Internet. The growth and complexity of knowledge, research and evidence for best practices in health mirrors the growth of the Internet and its tools to disseminate information, to provide forums for eclectic interactions and informative discussions. Our clients are aptly at this intersection – they are at the centre and we need to meet them there. This intersection is a magical place; it‘s on fire with prolific activity.

We are the benefactors of a modern revolution: the intersection of advances in technology, creative interfaces and evidence-based therapies are taking healthcare to levels only dreamed of. “The motive behind the use of this technology is to maintain the essential qualities of the health-care interaction, while improving access by overcoming barriers such as economics, culture, climate, and geography,” (Rees, 2004).

Telehealth has been touted as the most significant contribution to health-care delivery systems of the future (Bashshur, 1997). eRehabilitation™, a component of telehealth, is a cutting-edge, yet flourishing means of delivering rehabilitation, psychological & mental health services.

At Brainworks, we have developed eRehabilitation™ as a comprehensive treatment platform that uses interactive audio, video, or data communications to provide rehabilitation services at a distance.

 

Does eRehabilitation™ work?

Absolutely – eRehabilitation™ is Evidence-Based: there is a growing literature base that demonstrates the efficacy of these interactive, online modalities.

There are several areas for which online guided therapy based on CBT could be regarded as empirically-supported (Andersson, 2009), including panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and mild to moderate depression. progress. Carlbring et al. (2005) found equivalent outcomes of individual face-to-face CBT and Internet CBT for panic disorder. In a trial on depression (Spek, Nyklıcek, et al., 2007) found no differences between live group treatment and Internet CBT.

A recent study by Matsura et al. (2002) investigated the interrater reliability of videoconferencing compared with face-to-face assessment interviews. Perfect agreement was obtained between both interviewing conditions. Glueckauf et al. (2002) assessed the effects of videoconferencing-based counselling compared with counselling using a speakerphone, and conventional, face-to-face counselling. The counselling was provided to 22 rural teenagers with epilepsy. All treatment conditions were associated with similar outcomes, including significant reductions in problem severity and frequency.

Day and Schneider (2002) conducted a comprehensive and methodologically sound study evaluating the delivery of brief CBT via videoconferencing. A sample of 80 clients with concerns ranging from weight concerns to personality disorders were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups (face-to-face, two-way audio, or two-way video) or a waiting list control group. No significant differences were found between treatment groups across outcome measures and all three groups were significantly superior to the no-treatment group.

A number of studies have demonstrated the benefits of conducting assessments via the Internet. These include: ease of administration, collecting data, communicating findings to clients, cost efficiency, reaching disabled persons and those that live in the rural areas (EmmelKamp, 2005; Fischer & Freid, 2001; Naus, Phillip, & Samsi 2009;).


References:

References available upon request. Please contact us for more information and literature to support your referral!

Source: How It All Works – Brainworks

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