[ARTICLE] Neurofeedback as a form of cognitive rehabilitation therapy following stroke: A systematic review – Full Text

Neurofeedback therapy (NFT) has been used within a number of populations however it has not been applied or thoroughly examined as a form of cognitive rehabilitation within a stroke population.

Objectives for this systematic review included:

  • i) identifying how NFT is utilized to treat cognitive deficits following stroke,
  • ii) examining the strength and quality of evidence to support the use of NFT as a form of cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT) and
  • iii) providing recommendations for future investigations.

Searches were conducted using OVID (Medline, Health Star, Embase + Embase Classic) and PubMed databases. Additional searches were completed using the Cochrane Reviews library database, Google Scholar, the University of Toronto online library catalogue, ClinicalTrials.gov website and select journals. Searches were completed Feb/March 2015 and updated in June/July/Aug 2015. Eight studies were eligible for inclusion in this review.

Studies were eligible for inclusion if they:

  • i) were specific to a stroke population,
  • ii) delivered CRT via a NFT protocol,
  • iii) included participants who were affected by a cognitive deficit(s) following stroke (i.e. memory loss, loss of executive function, speech impairment etc.).

NFT protocols were highly specific and varied within each study. The majority of studies identified improvements in participant cognitive deficits following the initiation of therapy. Reviewers assessed study quality using the Downs and Black Checklist for Measuring Study Quality tool; limited study quality and strength of evidence restricted generalizability of conclusions regarding the use of this therapy to the greater stroke population.

Progression in this field requires further inquiry to strengthen methodology quality and study design. Future investigations should aim to standardize NFT protocols in an effort to understand the dose-response relationship between NFT and improvements in functional outcome. Future investigations should also place a large emphasis on long-term participant follow-up.

Introduction

In 2011, stroke was identified as the third leading cause of death among Canadians (5.5%, 13 283 deaths), and considered to be the leading cause of neurological disability in Canadian adults [12]. Although stroke occurrence is most common in individuals aged 70 and older, stroke incidence for individuals over the age of 50 has increased by 24% and 13% in individuals over the age of 60, in the last decade [3]. Following a stroke, patients typically enter rehabilitation programs (i.e. physical therapy, occupational therapy, etc.) to address a multitude of physical, emotional and cognitive deficits [45]. Many rehabilitation interventions initiated following stroke primarily target functional motor impairments. In reviewing the literature, few investigations have been published that aim to target cognitive deficits, despite 40% of stroke survivors experiencing a decline in cognitive function (especially memory) following stroke [6].

The brain is a highly complex and organized organ therefore the extent of impairment and deficits that follow stroke are largely dependent on lesion severity and location [7]. Physiologically these impairments are a result of the loss of neuronal circuits and connections linked to the relevant sensory, motor, and cognitive functions [89]. Furthermore, it is thought that the neurological recovery that occurs following a stroke is a direct result of brain plasticity and it’s ability to repair and reorganize [10]. Some evidence exists for the initiation of reparative functions in the brain in as little as a few hours following a stroke [1112]. In respect to recovery trajectories following stroke, ninety-five percent of stroke patients reach their peak language recovery within 6 weeks of a stroke, and within 3 months for hemispatial neglect [1314]. Deficits that do not spontaneously resolve contribute to the large number of individuals requiring long term care following stroke (i.e. rehabilitative therapy) [1516]. Occupational and physical rehabilitation programs target functional and mobility issues however, in addition to these impairments patients experience a wide range of cognitive and neurological deficits. Individuals with impairments of this nature often require cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT).

CRT encompasses any intervention targeting the restoration, remediation and adaptation of cognitive functions including: attention, concentration, memory, comprehension, communication, reasoning, problem solving, planning, initiation, judgement, self-monitoring and awareness [17]. CRT can be offered in a variety of settings such as rehabilitation hospitals, community care facilities, private residences as well as the workplace [18]. Although cognitive therapy has been around since the early 19th century, the 1970’s marked the most recent biofeedback movement in CRT [18]. Traditionally used to treat muscular impairments (via electromyography (EMG) feedback) biofeedback has taken on a new form known as neurofeedback therapy (NFT). NFT targets the brain and cognitive functions through the use of electroencephalography (EEG), hence neurofeedback is sometimes referred to as EEG biofeedback [19]. In classical NFT, EEG and brainwave activity is provided as a visual or auditory cue to the user [6]. Using these cues the user can consciously adapt their brainwave activity to reach targeted training thresholds. NFT relies on operant conditioning to stimulate the neuroplastic abilities of the brain [2021]. Physiologically stimulating specific band frequencies over damaged areas stimulates cortical metabolism [19]. NFT is also used to counter excessive slow wave activity (i.e. theta waves and sometimes alpha waves) that typically follow stroke [21]. An alternative form of NFT known as nonlinear dynamical neurofeedback has also been used to restore homeostasis to the brain. This form of NFT requires no conscious effort from the participant to adapt their brainwaves in any particular direction (i.e. the participant maintains a passive role). Modalities like NeurOptimal® utilize Functional Targeting to provide the brain with “… information about itself which allows the brain to assemble it’s own, best organizing strategies moment by moment” [22]. In the context of this review, the studies included herein concern the use of classical NFT only.

To date, NFT has been used extensively to treat cognitive deficits associated with other neurological disorders and illnesses including: mild traumatic brain injury [23], ADD/ADHD [24], Epilepsy [25], Autism Spectrum Disorders [2627], Dyslexia [28], Fibromyalgia [29], Depression [30], and opiate additions [31]. Despite promising NFT outcomes within these populations, NFT has not been thoroughly evaluated for use in a stroke population. The aim of this systematic review was to thoroughly evaluate the available evidence pertinent to understanding the effectiveness of NFT as a form of CRT following stroke. To achieve this objective a number of research questions were established to guide this review:

  1. Among a stroke population, how is NFT utilized to treat cognitive deficits?
  2. Among identified NFT interventions targeting a stroke population, what is the quality and strength of evidence to support the use of NFT as a form of CRT following stroke?
  3. Based on the available NFT evidence for use in stroke populations, what recommendations can be made for future research?

 

The primary outcome of interest in this review was to identify if cognitive symptom complaints could be ameliorated following the initiation of NFT in a sub-acute and chronic post-stroke population. Secondary outcomes aimed to assess study quality, methodology and strength of support for use of NFT in this population.

Continue —> Neurofeedback as a form of cognitive rehabilitation therapy following stroke: A systematic review

Fig 1. PRISMA flow diagram.

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