[ARTICLE] Adaptive hybrid robotic system for rehabilitation of reaching movement after a brain injury: a usability study – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Brain injury survivors often present upper-limb motor impairment affecting the execution of functional activities such as reaching. A currently active research line seeking to maximize upper-limb motor recovery after a brain injury, deals with the combined use of functional electrical stimulation (FES) and mechanical supporting devices, in what has been previously termed hybrid robotic systems. This study evaluates from the technical and clinical perspectives the usability of an integrated hybrid robotic system for the rehabilitation of upper-limb reaching movements after a brain lesion affecting the motor function.

Methods

The presented system is comprised of four main components. The hybrid assistance is given by a passive exoskeleton to support the arm weight against gravity and a functional electrical stimulation device to assist the execution of the reaching task. The feedback error learning (FEL) controller was implemented to adjust the intensity of the electrical stimuli delivered on target muscles according to the performance of the users. This control strategy is based on a proportional-integral-derivative feedback controller and an artificial neural network as the feedforward controller. Two experiments were carried out in this evaluation. First, the technical viability and the performance of the implemented FEL controller was evaluated in healthy subjects (N = 12). Second, a small cohort of patients with a brain injury (N = 4) participated in two experimental session to evaluate the system performance. Also, the overall satisfaction and emotional response of the users after they used the system was assessed.

Results

In the experiment with healthy subjects, a significant reduction of the tracking error was found during the execution of reaching movements. In the experiment with patients, a decreasing trend of the error trajectory was found together with an increasing trend in the task performance as the movement was repeated. Brain injury patients expressed a great acceptance in using the system as a rehabilitation tool.

Conclusions

The study demonstrates the technical feasibility of using the hybrid robotic system for reaching rehabilitation. Patients’ reports on the received intervention reveal a great satisfaction and acceptance of the hybrid robotic system.

Background

Upper limb hemiparesis is one of the most common consequences after a brain injury accident [1]. This motor impairment has an adverse impact on the quality of life of survivors since it hinders the execution of activities of daily living. From the rehabilitation perspective, it is widely accepted that high-intensity and repetitive task-specific practice is the most effective principle to promote motor recovery after a brain injury [12]. However, traditional rehabilitation treatment offers a dose of movement repetition that is in most cases insufficient to facilitate neural reorganization [3]. In response to these current clinical shortcomings, there is a clear interest in alternative rehabilitation methods that improve the arm motor functionality of brain injury survivors.

Hybrid robotic systems for motor rehabilitation are a promising approach that combine the advantages of robotic support or assistive devices and functional electrical stimulation (FES) technologies to overcome their individual limitations and to offer more robust rehabilitation interventions [4]. Despite the potential benefits of using hybrid robotic systems for arm rehabilitation, a recent published review shows that only a few hybrid systems presented in the literature were tested with stroke patients [4]. Possible reasons could be the difficulties arising from the integration of both assistive technologies or the lack of integrated platforms that can be easily setup and used.

End-effector robotic devices combined with FES represent the most typical hybrid systems used to train reaching tasks under constrained conditions [567]. With these systems, patients’ forearms are typically restricted to the horizontal plane to isolate the training of the elbow extension movement. The main advantage of this approach is the simplicity of the setup, with only 1 Degree of Freedom (DoF). However, to maximize the treatment’s outcomes and achieve functional improvement it is necessary to train actions with higher range of motion (> 1 DoF) and functional connotations [89]. Yet, the complexity for driving a successful movement execution in such scenarios requires the implementation of a robust and reliable FES controller.

The appropriate design and implementation of FES controllers play a key role to achieve stable and robust motion control in hybrid robotic systems. The control strategy must be able to drive all the necessary joints to realize the desired movement, and compensate any disturbances to the motion, i.e. muscle fatigue onset as well as the strong nonlinear and time-varying response of the musculoskeletal system to FES [1011]. Consequently, open-loop and simple feedback controllers (e.g. proportional-integral-derivative -PID-) are not robust enough to cope with these disturbances [812]. Meadmore et al. presented a more suitable hybrid robotic system for functional rehabilitation scenarios [13]. They implemented a model-based iterative learning controller (ILC) that adjusts the FES intensity based on the tracking error of the previously executed movement (see [1314] for a detail description of the system). This iterative adjustment allows compensating for disturbances caused by FES. Although this approach addresses some of the issues regarding motion control with FES, it requires a detailed mathematical description of the musculoskeletal system to work properly. In this context, unmodeled dynamics and the linearization of the model can reduce the robustness of the controller performance. Also, the identification of the model’s parameters is complex and time consuming, which limits its applicability in clinical settings [1112].

The Feedback Error Learning (FEL) scheme proposed by Kawato [15] can be considered as an alternative to ILC. This scheme was developed to describe how the central nervous system acquires an internal model of the body to improve the motor control. Under this scheme, the motor control command of a feedback controller is used to train a feedforward controller to learn implicitly the inverse dynamics of the controlled system on-line (i.e. the arm). Complementary, this on-line learning procedure also allows the controller to adapt and compensate for disturbances. In contrast with the ILC, the main advantage of this strategy is that the controller does not require an explicit model of the controlled system to work correctly and that it can directly learn the non-linear characteristic of the controlled system. Therefore, using the FEL control strategy to control a hybrid robotic system can simplify the setup of the system considerably, which makes easier to deploy it in clinical settings as well as personalize its response according to each patient’s musculoskeletal characteristics and movement capabilities. The FEL has been used previously to control the wrist [16] and the lower limb [17] motion with FES in healthy subjects; but it has not been tested on brain injury patients. In a previous pilot study, we partially showed the suitability of the FEL scheme in hybrid robotic systems for reaching rehabilitation with healthy subjects [18]. However, a rigorous and robust analysis has not been presented neither this concept has not been tested with motor impaired patients.

The main objective of this study is to verify the usability of a fully integrated hybrid robotic system based on an FEL scheme for rehabilitation of reaching movement in brain injury patients. To attain such objective two-step experimentation was followed. The first part consists of demonstrating the technical viability and learning capability of the developed FEL controller to drive the execution of a coordinated shoulder-elbow joint movement. The second part consists of testing the usability of the platform with brain injury patients in a more realistic rehabilitation scenario. For this purpose, we assessed the patients’ performance and overall satisfaction and emotional response after using the system.

Methods

In this section, we present the hybrid robotic system for the rehabilitation of reaching movement in patients with a brain injury. The system focuses on aiding users to move their paretic arm towards specific distal directions in the space. During the execution of the reaching task, the FEL controller adjusts the intensities of the electrical stimuli delivered to target muscles in order to aid the subjects in tracking accurately the target paths.

Description of the hybrid rehabilitation platform for reaching rehabilitation

Figure 1 shows the general overview of the developed platform. This rehabilitation platform is composed of four main components: the hybrid assistive device (upper limb exoskeleton + FES device); the high-level controller (HLC); the visual feedback and; the user interface. […]

Fig. 1 a General overview of the presented hybrid robotic platform for reaching rehabilitation. bVisual feedback provided to the users. The green ball represents the actual arm position, the blue cross is the reference trajectory, the initial and final position are represented by the gray ball and red square respectively. c Interface for system configuration

Source: Adaptive hybrid robotic system for rehabilitation of reaching movement after a brain injury: a usability study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

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