[Abstract] Outcome measurement of hand function following mirror therapy for stroke rehabilitation: A systematic review

Highlights

  • Current studies on mirror therapy after stroke are not consistent in the assessment tools that are used to determine hand function.
  • Outcome measures used in the included studies are not fully reflective of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.
  • Most outcome measures used in the included studies are rated by the therapist and have determined validity, reliability, and responsiveness; however, responsiveness is the least investigated psychometric property.
  • Integrating a combination of measures that are psychometrically sound and reflective of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health should be considered for assessment of hand function after mirror therapy after stroke.

Abstract

Study Design

Systematic review.

Introduction

Mirror therapy is a treatment used to address hand function following a stroke. Measurement of outcomes using appropriate assessment tools is crucial; however, many assessment options exist.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose of this study is to systematically review outcome measures that are used to assess hand function following mirror therapy after stroke and, in addition, to identify the psychometric and descriptive properties of the included measures and through the linking process determine if the outcome measures are representative of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

Methods

Following a comprehensive literature search, outcome measures used in the included studies were linked to the ICF and analyzed based on descriptive information and psychometric properties.

Results

Eleven studies met inclusion criteria and included 24 different assessment tools to measure hand or upper limb function. Most outcome measures used in the selected studies (63%) were rated by the evaluating therapist. Thirteen outcome measures (54%) linked to the ICF body function category and 10 measures (42%) linked to activities and participation. One outcome measure was linked to not defined, and all other ICF categories were not represented. A majority of outcome measures have been assessed for validity, reliability, and responsiveness, but responsiveness was the least investigated psychometric property.

Discussion

Current studies on mirror therapy after stroke are not consistent in the assessment tools used to determine hand function. Understanding of study outcomes requires analysis of the assessment tools. The outcome measures used in the included studies are not representative of personal and environmental factors, but tools linking to body functions and activities and participations provide important information on functional outcome.

Conclusions

Integrating a combination of measures that are psychometrically sound and reflective of the ICF should be considered for assessment of hand function after mirror therapy after stroke.

via Outcome measurement of hand function following mirror therapy for stroke rehabilitation: A systematic review – Journal of Hand Therapy

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