[ARTICLE] Technological Approaches for Neurorehabilitation: From Robotic Devices to Brain Stimulation and Beyond – Full Text

Neurological diseases causing motor/cognitive impairments are among the most common causes of adult-onset disability. More than one billion of people are affected worldwide, and this number is expected to increase in upcoming years, because of the rapidly aging population. The frequent lack of complete recovery makes it desirable to develop novel neurorehabilitative treatments, suited to the patients, and better targeting the specific disability. To date, rehabilitation therapy can be aided by the technological support of robotic-based therapy, non-invasive brain stimulation, and neural interfaces. In this perspective, we will review the above methods by referring to the most recent advances in each field. Then, we propose and discuss current and future approaches based on the combination of the above. As pointed out in the recent literature, by combining traditional rehabilitation techniques with neuromodulation, biofeedback recordings and/or novel robotic and wearable assistive devices, several studies have proven it is possible to sensibly improve the amount of recovery with respect to traditional treatments. We will then discuss the possible applied research directions to maximize the outcome of a neurorehabilitation therapy, which should include the personalization of the therapy based on patient and clinician needs and preferences.

Introduction

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), neurological disorders and injuries account for the 6.3% of the global burden of disease (GBD) (12). With more than 6% of DALY (disability-adjusted life years) in the world, neurological disorders represent one of the most widespread clinical condition. Among neurological disorders, more than half of the burden in DALYs is constituted by cerebral-vascular disease (55%), such as stroke. Stroke, together with spinal cord injury (SCI), accounts for 52% of the adult-onset disability and, over a billion people (i.e., about a 15% of the population worldwide) suffer from some form of disability (3). These numbers are likely to increase in the coming years due to the aging of the population (4), since disorders affecting people aged 60 years and older contribute to 23% of the total GBD (5).

Standard physical rehabilitation favors the functional recovery after stroke, as compared to no treatment (6). However, the functional recovery is not always satisfactory as only 20% of patients fully resume their social life and job activities (7). Hence, the need of more effective and patient-tailored rehabilitative approaches to maximize the functional outcome of neurological injuries as well as patients’ quality of life (8). Modern technological methodologies represent one of the most recent advances in neurorehabilitation, and an increasing body of evidence supports their role in the recovery from brain and/or medullary insults. This manuscript provides a perspective on how technologies and methodologies could be combined in order to maximize the outcome of neurorehabilitation.

Current Systems and Therapeutic Approaches for Neurorehabilitation

The great progress made in interdisciplinary fields, such as neural engineering (910), has allowed to investigate many neural mechanisms, by detecting and processing the neural signals at high spatio-temporal resolution, and by interfacing the nervous system with external devices, thus restoring neurological functions lost due to disease/injury. The progress continues in parallel to technological advancements. The last two decades there has seen a large proliferation of technological approaches for human rehabilitation, such as robots, wearable systems, brain stimulation, and virtual environments. In the next sections, we will focus on: robotic therapy, non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS), and neural interfaces.

Robotic Devices

Robots for neurorehabilitation are designed to support the administration of physical exercises to the upper or lower extremities, with the purpose of promoting neuro-motor recovery. This technology has a relatively long history, dating back to the early 1990s (11). Robot devices for rehabilitation differ widely in terms of mechanical design, number of degrees of freedom, and control architectures. As regards the mechanical design, robots may have either a single point of interaction (i.e., end effector) with the user body (endpoint robots or manipulanda) or multiple points of interaction (exoskeletons and wearable robots) (12).

Endpoint robots for the upper extremity, include Inmotion2 (IMT, USA) (13), KINARM End-Point (BKIN, Canada), and Braccio di Ferro (14) (Figure 1A1, left). Only some of these devices have been tested in randomized clinical trials (15), confirming an improvement of upper limb motor function after stroke (16). However, convincing evidence in favor of significant changes in activities of daily living (ADL) indicators is lacking (17), possibly because performance in ADL is highly affected by hand functionality. A good example of lower limb endpoint robot is represented by gait trainer GT1 (Reha-Stim, Germany). Its efficacy was tested by Picelli et al. (18), who demonstrated an improvement in multiple clinical measures in subjects with Parkinson’s disease following robotic-assisted rehabilitation when compared to physical rehabilitation alone (18). Endpoint robots are also available for postural rehabilitation. For instance, Hunova (Movendo Technology, Italy, launched in 2017) is equipped with a seat and a platform that induce multidirectional movements to improve postural stability (Figure 1A1, right).

 

Figure 1. Neurorehabilitation therapies. (A1) Endpoint robots: on the left the “Braccio di Ferro” manipulandum, on the right the postural robot Hunova. Braccio di ferro (14) is a planar manipulandum with 2-DOF, developed at the University of Genoa (Italy). It is equipped with direct-drive brushless motors and is specially designed to minimize endpoint inertia. It uses the H3DAPI programming environment, which allows to share exercise protocol with other devices. Written informed consent was obtained from the subject depicted in the panel. Movendo Technology’s Hunova is a robotic device that permits full-body rehabilitation. It has two 2-DOF actuated and sensorized platforms located under the seat and on the floor level that allow it to rehabilitate several body districts, including lower limb (thanks to the floor-level platform), the core, and the back, using the platform located underneath the seat. Different patient categories (orthopedic, neurological, and geriatric) can be treated, and interact with the machine through a GUI based on serious games. (A2) Wearable device: the recent exoskeleton Twin. Twin is a fully modular device developed at IIT and co-funded by INAIL (the Italian National Institute for Insurance against Accidents at Work). The device can be easily assembled/disassembled by the patient/therapist. It provides total assistance to patients in the 5–95th percentile range with a weight up to 110 kg. Its modularity is implemented by eight quick release connectors, each located at both mechanical ends of each motor, that allow mechanical and electrical connection with the rest of the structure. It can implement three different walking patterns that can be fully customized according to the patient’s needs viaa GUI on mobile device, thus enabling personalization of the therapy. Steps can be triggered via an IMU-based machine state controller. (B1) Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) representation. rTMS refers to the application of magnetic pulses in a repetitive mode. Conventional rTMS applied at low frequency (0.2–1 Hz) results in plastic inhibition of cortical excitability, whereas when it is applied at high frequency (≥5Hz), it leads to excitation (19). rTMS can also be applied in a “patterned mode.” Theta burst stimulation involves applying bursts of high frequency magnetic stimulation (three pulses at 50 Hz) repeated at intervals of 200 ms (20). Intermittent TBS increases cortical excitability for a period of 20–30 min, whereas continuous TBS leads to a suppression of cortical activity for approximately the same amount of time (20). (B2) Transcranial current stimulation (tCS) representation. tCS uses ultra-low intensity current, to manipulate the membrane potential of neurons and modulate spontaneous firing rates, but is insufficient on its own to discharge resting neurons or axons (21). tCS is an umbrella term for a number of brain modulating paradigms, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (22), transcranial alternating current stimulation (23), and transcranial random noise stimulation (24). (C) A typical BCI system. Five stages are represented: brain-signal acquisition, preprocessing, feature extraction/selection, classification, and application interface. In the first stage, brain-signal acquisition, suitable signals are acquired using an appropriate modality. Since the acquired signals are normally weak and contain noise (physiological and instrumental) and artifacts, preprocessing is needed, which is the second stage. In the third stage, some useful data or so-called “features” are extracted. These features, in the fourth stage, are classified using a suitable classifier. Finally, in the fifth stage, the classified signals are transmitted to a computer or other external devices for generating the desired control commands to the devices. In neurofeedback applications, the application interface is a real-time display of brain activity, which enables self-regulation of brain functions (25).

Continue —> Frontiers | Technological Approaches for Neurorehabilitation: From Robotic Devices to Brain Stimulation and Beyond | Neurology

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