[ARTICLE] Effectiveness of Robot-Assisted Upper Limb Training on Spasticity, Function and Muscle Activity in Chronic Stroke Patients Treated With Botulinum Toxin: A Randomized Single-Blinded Controlled Trial – Full Text

Background: The combined use of Robot-assisted UL training and Botulinum toxin (BoNT) appear to be a promising therapeutic synergism to improve UL function in chronic stroke patients.

Objective: To evaluate the effects of Robot-assisted UL training on UL spasticity, function, muscle strength and the electromyographic UL muscles activity in chronic stroke patients treated with Botulinum toxin.

Methods: This single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involved 32 chronic stroke outpatients with UL spastic hemiparesis. The experimental group (n = 16) received robot-assisted UL training and BoNT treatment. The control group (n = 16) received conventional treatment combined with BoNT treatment. Training protocols lasted for 5 weeks (45 min/session, two sessions/week). Before and after rehabilitation, a blinded rater evaluated patients. The primary outcome was the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Secondary outcomes were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale (FMA) and the Medical Research Council Scale (MRC). The electromyographic activity of 5 UL muscles during the “hand-to-mouth” task was explored only in the experimental group and 14 healthy age-matched controls using a surface Electromyography (EMGs).

Results: No significant between-group differences on the MAS and FMA were measured. The experimental group reported significantly greater improvements on UL muscle strength (p = 0.004; Cohen’s d = 0.49), shoulder abduction (p = 0.039; Cohen’s d = 0.42), external rotation (p = 0.019; Cohen’s d = 0.72), and elbow flexion (p = 0.043; Cohen’s d = 1.15) than the control group. Preliminary observation of muscular activity showed a different enhancement of the biceps brachii activation after the robot-assisted training.

Conclusions: Robot-assisted training is as effective as conventional training on muscle tone reduction when combined with Botulinum toxin in chronic stroke patients with UL spasticity. However, only the robot-assisted UL training contributed to improving muscle strength. The single-group analysis and the qualitative inspection of sEMG data performed in the experimental group showed improvement in the agonist muscles activity during the hand-to-mouth task.

Introduction

Upper limb (UL) sensorimotor impairments are one of the major determinants of long-term disability in stroke survivors (1). Several disturbances are the manifestation of UL impairments after stroke (i.e., muscle weakness, changes in muscle tone, joint disturbances, impaired motor control). However, spasticity and weakness are the primary reason for rehabilitative intervention in the chronic stages (13). Historically, spasticity refers to a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks resulting from hyperexcitability of the stretch reflex (4) while weakness is the loss of the ability to generate the normal amount of force.

From 7 to 38% of post-stroke patients complain of UL spasticity in the first year (5). The pathophysiology of spasticity is complicated, and new knowledge has progressively challenged this definition. Processes involving central and peripheral mechanisms contribute to the spastic movement disorder resulting in abnormal regulation of tonic stretch reflex and increased muscle resistance of the passively stretched muscle and deficits in agonist and antagonist coactivation (67). The resulting immobilization of the muscle at a fixed length for a prolonged time induces secondary biomechanical and viscoelastic properties changes in muscles and soft tissues, and pain (811). These peripheral mechanisms, in turn, leads to further stiffness, and viscoelastic muscle changes (28). Whether the muscular properties changes may be adaptive and secondary to paresis are uncertain. However, the management of UL spasticity should combine treatment of both the neurogenic and peripheral components of spasticity (910).

UL weakness after stroke is prevalent in both acute and chronic phases of recovery (3). It is a determinant of UL function in ADLs and other negative consequences such as bone mineral content (3), atrophy and altered muscle pattern of activation. Literature supports UL strengthening training effectiveness for all levels of impairment and in all stages of recovery (3). However, a small number of trials have been performed in chronic subgroup patients, and there is still controversy in including this procedure in UL rehabilitation (3).

Botulinum toxin (BoNT) injection in carefully selected muscles is a valuable treatment for spastic muscles in stroke patients improving deficits in agonist and antagonist coactivation, facilitating agonist recruitment and increasing active range of motion (681214). However, improvements in UL activity or performance is modest (13). With a view of improving UL function after stroke, moderate to high-quality evidence support combining BoNT treatment with other rehabilitation procedures (1915). Specifically, the integration of robotics in the UL rehabilitation holds promise for developing high-intensity, repetitive, task-specific, interactive treatment of upper limb (15). The combined use of these procedures to compensate for their limitations has been studied in only one pilot RCT reporting positive results in UL function (Fugl-Meyer UL Assessment scale) and muscular activation pattern (16). With the limits of the small sample, the results support the value of combining high-intensity UL training by robotics and BoNT treatment in patients with UL spastic paresis.

Clinical scales are currently used to assess the rehabilitation treatment effects, but these outcome measures may suffer from some drawbacks that can be overcome by instrumental assessment as subjectivity, limited sensitivity, and the lack of information on the underlying training effects on motor control (17). Instrumental assessment, such as surface electromyography (sEMG) during a functional task execution allows assessing abnormal activation of spastic muscles and deficits of voluntary movements in patients with stroke.

Moreover, the hand-to-mouth task is representative of Activities of Daily Life (ADL) such as eating and drinking. Kinematic analysis of the hand-to-mouth task has been widely used to assess UL functions in individuals affected by neurological diseases showing adequate to more than adequate test-retest reliability in healthy subjects (1819). The task involves flexing the elbow a slightly flexing the shoulder against gravity, and it is considered to be a paradigmatic functional task for the assessment of spasticity and strength deficits on the elbow muscles (1720). Although sEMG has been reported to be a useful assessment procedure to detect muscle activity improvement after rehabilitation, limited results have been reported (1621).

The primary aim of this study was to explore the therapeutic synergisms of combined robot-assisted upper limb training and BoNT treatment on upper limb spasticity. The secondary aim was to evaluate the treatment effects on UL function, muscle strength, and the electromyographic activity of UL muscles during a functional task.

The combined treatment would contribute to decrease UL spasticity and improve function through a combination of training effects between BoNT neurolysis and the robotic treatment. A reduction of muscle tone would parallel improvement in muscle strength ought to the high-intensity, repetitive and task-specific robotic training. Since spasticity is associated with abnormal activation of shortening muscles and deficits in voluntary movement of the UL, the sEMG assessment would target these impairments (281115).

Materials and Methods

Trial Design

A single-blind RCT with two parallel group is reported. The primary endpoint was the changes in UL spasticity while the secondary endpoints were changes in UL function, muscle strength and the electromyographic activity of UL muscles during a functional task. The study was conducted according to the tenets of the Declaration of Helsinki, the guidelines for Good Clinical Practice, and the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT), approved by the local Ethics Committee “Nucleo ricerca clinica–Research and Biostatistic Support Unit” (prog n.2366), and registered at clinical trial (NCT03590314).

Patients

Chronic post-stroke patients with upper-limb spasticity referred to the Neurorehabilitation Unit (AOUI Verona) and the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Section, “OORR” Hospital (University of Foggia) were assessed for eligibility.

Inclusion criteria were: age > 18 years, diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic first-ever stroke as documented by a computerized tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, at least 6 months since stroke, Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) score (shoulder and elbow) ≤ 3 and ≥1+ (22), BoNT injection within the previous 12 weeks of at least one of muscles of the affected upper limb, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score ≥24 (23) and Trunk Control Test score = 100/100 (24).

Exclusion criteria were: any rehabilitation intervention in the 3 months before recruitment, bilateral cerebrovascular lesion, severe neuropsychologic impairment (global aphasia, severe attention deficit or neglect), joint orthopedic disorders.

All participants were informed regarding the experimental nature of the study. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects. The local ethics committee approved the study.

Interventions

Each patient underwent a BoNT injection in the paretic limb. The dose of BoNT injected into the target muscle was based on the severity of spasticity in each case. Different commercial formulations of BoNT were used according to the pharmaceutical portfolio contracts of our Hospitals (Onabotulinumtoxin A, Abobotulinumtoxin A, and Incobotulinumtoxin A). The dose, volume and number of injection sites were set accordingly. A Logiq ® Book XP portable ultrasound system (GE Healthcare; Chalfont St. Giles, UK) was used to inject BoNT into the target muscle.

Before the start of the study authors designed the experimental (EG) and the control group (CG) protocols. Two physiotherapists, one for each group, carried out the rehabilitation procedures. Patients of both groups received ten individual sessions (45 min/session, two sessions/week, five consecutive weeks). Treatments were performed in the rehabilitative gym of the G. B. Rossi University Hospital Neurological Rehabilitation Unit, or “OORR” Hospital.

Robot-Assisted UL Training

The Robot-assisted UL Training group was treated using the electromechanical device Armotion (Reha Technology, Olten, Switzerland). It is an end-effector device that allows goal-directed arm movements in a bi-dimensional space with visual feedback. It offers different training modalities such as passive, active, passive-active, perturbative, and assistive modes. The robot can move, drive or oppose the patient’s movement and allows creating a personalized treatment, varying parameters such as some repetitions, execution speed, resistance degree of motion. The exercises available from the software are supported by games that facilitate the functional use of the paretic arm (25). The robot is equipped with a control system called “impedance control” that modulates the robot movements for adapting to the motor behavior of the patient’s upper limb. The joints involved in the exercises were the shoulder and the elbow, is the wrist fixed to the device.

The Robot-assisted UL Training consisted of passive mobilization and stretching exercises for affected UL (10 min) followed by robot-assisted exercises (35 min). Four types of exercises contained within the Armotion software and amount of repetitions were selected as follows: (i) “Collect the coins” (45–75 coins/10 min), (ii) “Drive the car” (15–25 laps/10 min), (iii) “Wash the dishes” (40–60 repetitions/10 min), and (iv) “Burst the balloons” (100–150 balloons/5 min) (Figure 1). All exercises were oriented to achieving several goals in various directions, emphasizing the elbow flexion-extension and reaching movement. The robot allows participants to execute the exercises through an “assisted as needed” control strategy. For increment the difficulty, we have varied the assisted and non-assisted modality, increasing the number of repetitions over the study period.[…]

 

Figure 1. The upper limb robot-assisted training setting.

Continue —> Frontiers | Effectiveness of Robot-Assisted Upper Limb Training on Spasticity, Function and Muscle Activity in Chronic Stroke Patients Treated With Botulinum Toxin: A Randomized Single-Blinded Controlled Trial | Neurology

, , , , , , , , , ,

  1. Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: