[Abstract] Four-week training involving ankle mobilization with movement versus static muscle stretching in patients with chronic stroke: a randomized control trial.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Patients with stroke generally have diminished balance and gait. Mobilization with movement (MWM) can be used with manual force applied by a therapist to enhance talus gliding movement. Furthermore, the weight-bearing position during the lunge may enhance the stretch force.

OBJECTIVES:
This study aimed to compare the effects of a 4-week program of MWM training with those of static muscle stretching (SMS). Ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF-PROM), static balance ability (SBA), the Berg balance scale (BBS), and gait parameters (gait speed and cadence) were measured in patients with chronic stroke.

METHODS:
Twenty patients with chronic stroke participated in this study. Participants were randomized to either the MWM (n = 10) or the SMS (n = 10) group. Patients in both groups underwent standard rehabilitation therapy for 30 min per session. In addition, MWM and SMS techniques were performed three times per week for 4 weeks. Ankle DF-PROM, SBA, BBS score, and gait parameters were measured after 4 weeks of training.

RESULTS:
After 4 weeks of training, the MWM group showed significant improvement in all outcome measures compared with baseline (p < 0.05). Furthermore, SBA, BBS, and cadence showed greater improvement in the MWM group compared to the SMS group (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:
This study demonstrated that MWM training, combined with standard rehabilitation, improved ankle DF-PROM, SBA, BBS scores, and gait speed and cadence. Thus, MWM may be an effective treatment for patients with chronic stroke.

via Four-week training involving ankle mobilization with movement versus static muscle stretching in patients with chronic stroke: a randomized control… – PubMed – NCBI

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