[ARTICLE] Increased Sensorimotor Cortex Activation With Decreased Motor Performance During Functional Upper Extremity Tasks Poststroke – Full Text

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Current literature has focused on identifying neuroplastic changes associated with stroke through tasks and in positions that are not representative of functional rehabilitation. Emerging technologies such as functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) provide new methods of expanding the area of neuroplasticity within rehabilitation. This study determined the differences in sensorimotor cortex activation during unrestrained reaching and gripping after stroke.

Methods: Eleven individuals with chronic stroke and 11 neurologically healthy individuals completed reaching and gripping tasks under 3 conditions using their (1) stronger, (2) weaker, and (3) both arms together. Performance and sensorimotor cortex activation using fNIRS were collected. Group and arm differences were calculated using mixed analysis of covariance (covariate: age). Pairwise comparisons were used for post hoc analyses. Partial Pearson correlations between performance and activation were assessed for each task, group, and hemisphere.

Results: Larger sensorimotor activations in the ipsilesional hemisphere were found for the stroke compared with healthy group for reaching and gripping conditions despite poorer performance. Significant correlations were observed between gripping performance (with the weaker arm and both arms simultaneously) and sensorimotor activation for the stroke group only.

Discussion and Conclusions: Stroke leads to significantly larger sensorimotor activation during functional reaching and gripping despite poorer performance. This may indicate an increased sense of effort, decreased efficiency, or increased difficulty after stroke. fNIRS can be used for assessing differences in brain activation during movements in functional positions after stroke. This can be a promising tool for investigating possible neuroplastic changes associated with functional rehabilitation interventions in the stroke population.

Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Video Abstract, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A269).

 

INTRODUCTION

Stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in Canada, with approximately 405 000 Canadians currently living with its long-lasting effects.1 While the site of injury and the specific presentation of symptoms are heterogeneous, up to 70% of these individuals experience upper extremity hemiparesis,2 and even after rehabilitation, greater than 65% of this population have difficulty utilizing their affected limb in activities of daily living.3 Decreased use of the paretic arm can lead to chronic pain and weakness, decreased bone density,4 cerebral cortex changes,5and an overall decrease in quality of life.6 In addition, stroke rehabilitation and continual care are costly for the health care system.7 Therefore, it is important to maximize patient recovery in an effective and efficient manner.

One area that has been highly debated for rehabilitation efficacy is the side of arm training. Numerous reviews have stated conflicting and inconclusive results pertaining to benefits of the paretic (affected) arm or bilateral arm training8–10 and a few studies have recently investigated the effects of the nonparetic (less-affected) arm training.11,12 Investigating how stroke itself affects neural activation during unilateral and bilateral upper extremity activities may help explain the mechanisms underlying such training.

In individuals living with the chronic effects of stroke, nonnormal brain activation is commonly seen with irregular activation in both the ipsi- and contralesional hemispheres during movement. A meta-analysis of 20 studies13 calculated increases in contralesional primary motor cortex, and bilateral premotor and supplementary motor areas with use of the paretic hand compared with healthy individuals. Systematically reviewing 22 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography studies, Buma et al14 reported general initial increases in contra-, ipsi-, and perilesional activation during paretic upper extremity movement in individuals with cortical and subcortical strokes when compared with healthy adults. In addition, as paretic arm performance increased with training, these authors also showed that in many, but not all participants, activation decreased in areas such as the contralesional motor cortex (ie, ipsilateral to the movement arm), which is not typically activated in healthy individuals. Previous reviews have also reported increases in cortical activation of motor supporting areas (bilateral premotor and supplementary motor areas) later in recovery that are associated with greater function,15 although the opposite has also been reported.16

The majority of previously mentioned evidence utilized neuroimaging techniques that require an individual to remain fairly still, especially at the head, and recorded in the supine position. While there are many advantages to these techniques, such as high spatial resolution and penetration depth using fMRI, the functional imaging data acquired from these studies may not be truly indicative of the neural correlates involved during rehabilitation tasks. Thus, assessment of brain activation during upright, unrestrained, functional tasks is needed. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging neuroimaging device that has the capabilities of determining cortical activation while the participant is mobile. Similar to fMRI, fNIRS is an indirect measure of cortical activation that utilizes the neurovascular coupling theory to estimate changes in brain activity.17 Near-infrared light emitted by this device is absorbed by areas high in oxyhemoglobin or deoxyhemoglobin content and is measured through detectors placed on the individual’s head. When an increase in brain activity occurs, a typical overall increase in oxyhemoglobin concentration and a slight decrease in deoxyhemoglobin are observed.17 Due to its portability, fNIRS has been used to investigate cortical activation during various mobile tasks after stroke.18,19 To our knowledge, no work has been done to compare sensorimotor cortex activation of paretic, nonparetic, and bilateral arm movements poststroke using fNIRS.

Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate differences in cortical brain activation during performance of upper extremity activities in an upright position after stroke and in neurologically healthy individuals. Based on the current evidence, we hypothesized that greater sensorimotor cortex activation would be observed in the stroke group compared with the neurologically healthy group, particularly when using the weaker arm. For our secondary measures, we hypothesize that (1) individuals in the stroke group will perform worse than the control group when using their weaker arm and (2) cortical activation in the contralateral hemisphere (eg, ipsilesional hemisphere during paretic arm movements) will positively correlate with task performance.[…]

Continue —->  Increased Sensorimotor Cortex Activation With Decreased Moto… : Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy

Figure 1
(A) Schematic of the environmental setup for the reaching task. Two adjacent Box and Block sets were placed in front of the participant. The left box was for the left hand and the right box was for the right hand. Arrows indicate the movement of the blocks from the box closest to the participant to the box further in front of the participant. (B) Schematic of the optode placements with reference to the international 10/10 system. Source probes are indicated by black circles and detector probes are indicated by gray circles.
Source
Increased Sensorimotor Cortex Activation With Decreased Motor Performance During Functional Upper Extremity Tasks Poststroke
Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy43(3):141-150, July 2019.

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  1. [ARTICLE] Increased Sensorimotor Cortex Activation With Decreased Motor Performance During Functional Upper Extremity Tasks Poststroke – Full Text — TBI Rehabilitation – Fisio-neuro-rehabilitation

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