[Abstract + References] Arm Games for Virtual Reality Based Post-stroke Rehabilitation – Conference paper

Abstract

Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability. World Health Organization (WHO) published that the second leading of death is stroke accident and every year, 15 million people worldwide suffer from stroke attack, two-thirds of them have a permanent disability. Muscle impairment can be treated by intensive movements involving repetitive task, task-oriented and task-variegated. Conventional stroke rehabilitation is expensive, less engaging and at the same time need more time for the rehabilitation process and need more energy and time for the therapist to guide the stroke-survivor. Modern stroke rehabilitation is more promising and more effective with modern rehabilitation aids allowing the rehabilitation process to be faster, however, this therapist method can be obtained in the big cities. To cover the lack of rehabilitation process in this research will develop and improve post-stroke rehabilitation using games. This research using electromyography (EMG) device to analyze the muscle contraction during the rehabilitation process and using Kinect XBOX to record trajectory hands movements. Five games from movements sequence have designed and will be examined in this research. This games obtained two results, the first is the EMG signal and the second is trajectory data. EMG signal can recognize muscle contractions during playing game and the trajectory data can save the pattern of movements and showed the pattern to the monitor. EMG signal processing using time or frequency feature extractions is a good idea to obtain more information from muscle contractions, also velocity, similarities and error movements can be obtained by study the possible approaches.

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