[BOOK Chapter] Assessment and Rehabilitation Using Virtual Reality after Stroke: A Literature Review – Abstract + References

Abstract

This chapter presents the studies that have used virtual reality as an assessment or rehabilitation tool of cognitive functions following a stroke. To be part of this review, publications must have made a collection of data from individuals who have suffered a stroke and must have been published between 1980 and 2017. A total of 50 publications were selected out of a possible 143 that were identified in the following databases: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Psychological and Behavioural Sciences Collection. Overall, we find that most of the studies that have used virtual reality with stroke patients focused on attention, spatial neglect, and executive functions/multitasking. Some studies have focused on route representation, episodic memory, and prospective memory. Virtual reality has been used for training of cognitive functions with stroke patients, but also for their assessment. Overall, the studies support the value and relevance of virtual reality as an assessment and rehabilitation tool with people who have suffered a stroke. Virtual reality seems indeed an interesting way to better describe the functioning of the person in everyday life. Virtual reality also sometimes seems to be more sensitive than traditional approaches for detecting deficits in stroke people. However, it is important to pursue work in this emergent field in clinical neuropsychology.

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