[ARTICLE] Effect of Specific Over Nonspecific VR-Based Rehabilitation on Poststroke Motor Recovery: A Systematic Meta-analysis – Full Text

Abstract

Background. Despite the rise of virtual reality (VR)-based interventions in stroke rehabilitation over the past decade, no consensus has been reached on its efficacy. This ostensibly puzzling outcome might not be that surprising given that VR is intrinsically neutral to its use—that is, an intervention is effective because of its ability to mobilize recovery mechanisms, not its technology. As VR systems specifically built for rehabilitation might capitalize better on the advantages of technology to implement neuroscientifically grounded protocols, they might be more effective than those designed for recreational gaming.

Objective. We evaluate the efficacy of specific VR (SVR) and nonspecific VR (NSVR) systems for rehabilitating upper-limb function and activity after stroke. Methods. We conducted a systematic search for randomized controlled trials with adult stroke patients to analyze the effect of SVR or NSVR systems versus conventional therapy (CT).

Results. We identified 30 studies including 1473 patients. SVR showed a significant impact on body function (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.23; 95% CI = 0.10 to 0.36; P = .0007) versus CT, whereas NSVR did not (SMD = 0.16; 95% CI = −0.14 to 0.47; P = .30). This result was replicated in activity measures.

Conclusions. Our results suggest that SVR systems are more beneficial than CT for upper-limb recovery, whereas NSVR systems are not. Additionally, we identified 6 principles of neurorehabilitation that are shared across SVR systems and are possibly responsible for their positive effect. These findings may disambiguate the contradictory results found in the current literature.

Introduction

Better medical treatments in the acute phase after stroke have increased survival and with that the number of patients needing rehabilitation with an associated increased burden on the health care system. Novel technologies have sought to meet this increased rehabilitation demand and to potentially allow patients to continue rehabilitation at home after they leave the hospital. Also, technology has the potential to gather massive and detailed data (eg, kinematic and performance data) that might be useful in understanding recovery after stroke better, improving the quality of diagnostic tools and developing more successful treatment approaches. Given these promises, several studies and meta-analyses have evaluated the effectiveness of technologies that use virtual reality (VR) in stroke rehabilitation. In a first review, Crosbie et al analyzed 6 studies that used VR to provide upper-limb rehabilitation. Although they found a positive effect, they concluded that the evidence was only weak to moderate given the low quality of the research. A later meta-analysis analyzing 5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 7 observational studies suggested a positive effect on a patient’s upper-limb function after training. Another meta-analysis of 26 studies by Lohse et al, which compared specific VR (SVR) systems with commercial VR games, found a significant benefit for SVR systems as compared with conventional therapy (CT) in both body function and activity but not between the 2 types of systems. This study, however, included a variety of systems that would treat upper-limb, lower-limb, and cognitive deficits. Saywell et al analyzed 30 “play-based” interventions, such as VR systems including commercial gaming consoles, rehabilitation tools, and robot-assisted systems. They found a significant effect of play-based versus control interventions in dose-matched studies in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the Upper Extremity (FM-UE). In contrast, a more recent large-scale analysis of a study with Nintendo Wii–based video games, including 121 patients concluded that recreational activities are as effective as VR. A later review evaluated 22 randomized and quasi–randomized controlled studies and concluded that there is no evidence that the use of VR and interactive video gaming is more beneficial in improving arm function than CT. In all, 31% of the included studies tested nonspecific VR (NSVR) systems (Nintendo Wii, Microsoft Xbox Kinect, Sony PlayStation EyeToy). Hence, although VR-based interventions have been in use for almost 2 decades, their benefit for functional recovery, especially for the upper limb, remains unknown. Possibly, these contradictory results indicate that, at present, studies are too few or too small and/or the recruited participants too variable to be conclusive. However, alternative conclusions can be drawn. First, VR is an umbrella term. Studies comparing its impact often include heterogeneous systems or technologies, customized or noncustomized for stroke treatment, addressing a broad range of disabilities. However, effectiveness can only be investigated if similar systems that rehabilitate the same impairment are contrasted. This has been achieved by meta-analyses that investigated VR-based interventions for the lower limb, concluding that VR systems are more effective in improving balance or gait than CT. Second, a clear understanding of the “active ingredients” that should make VR interventions effective in promoting recovery is missing. Therapeutic advantages of VR identified in current meta-analyses are that it might apply principles relevant to neuroplasticity,, such as providing goal-oriented tasks,, increasing repetition and dosage,, providing therapists and patients with additional feedback,,, and allowing to adjust task difficulty. In addition, it has been suggested that the use of VR increases patient motivation, enjoyment,, and engagement; makes intensive task-relevant training more interesting,; and offers enriched environments. Although motivational aspects are important in the rehabilitation process because they possibly increase adherence, their contribution to recovery is difficult to quantify because it relies on patients’ subjective evaluation., Rehabilitation methods, whether VR or not, however, need to be objectively beneficial in increasing the patient’s functional ability. Hence, an enormous effort has been expended to identify principles of neurorehabilitation that enhance motor learning and recovery. Consequently, an effective VR system should besides be motivating, also augment CT by applying these principles in the design. Following this argument, we advance the hypothesis that custom-made VR rehabilitation systems might have incorporated these principles, unlike off-the-shelf VR tools, because they were created for recreational purposes. Combining the effects of both approaches in one analysis might, thus, mask their real impact on recovery. Again, in the rehabilitation of the lower limb, this effect has been observed. Two meta-analyses investigating the effect of using commercial VR systems for gait and balance training did not find a superior effect, which contradicts the conclusions of the other systematic reviews. In upper-limb rehabilitation, this question has not been properly addressed until the most recent review by Aminov et al. However, there are several flaws in the method applied that could invalidate the results they found. Specifically, studies were included regardless of their quality, and it is not clear which outcome measurements were taken for the analysis according to the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Function, Disability, and Health (ICF-WHO). In addition, a specifically designed rehabilitation system (Interactive Rehabilitation Exercise [IREX]) was misclassified as an off-the-shelf VR tool. Because their search concluded in June 2017, the more recent evidence is missing. We decided to address these issues by conducting a well-controlled meta-analysis that focuses only on RCTs that use VR technologies for the recovery of the upper limb after stroke. We analyze the effect of VR systems specifically built for rehabilitation (ie, SVR systems) and off-the-shelf systems (ie, NSVR commercial systems) against CT according to the ICF-WHO categories. Also, we extracted 11 principles of motor learning and recovery from established literature that could act as “active ingredients” in the protocols of effective VR systems. Through a content analysis, we identified which principles are present in the included studies and compared their presence between SVR and NSVR systems. We hypothesized, first, that SVR systems might be more effective than NSVR systems as compared with CT in the recovery of upper-limb movement and, second, that this superior effect might be a result of the specific principles included in SVR systems.[…]

 

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