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[BOOK] Virtual Reality for Psychological and Neurocognitive Interventions

Virtual Reality for Psychological and Neurocognitive Interventions

  • Albert “Skip” Rizzo
  • Stéphane Bouchard

Part of the Virtual Reality Technologies for Health and Clinical Applications book series (VRTHCA)

Table of contents

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  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-xii

  1. William S. Ryan, Jessica Cornick, Jim Blascovich, Jeremy N. Bailenson
    Pages 15-46
  2. Berenice Serrano, Cristina Botella, Brenda K. Wiederhold, Rosa M. Baños
    Pages 47-84
  3. Melissa Peskin, Brittany Mello, Judith Cukor, Megan Olden, JoAnn Difede
    Pages 85-102
  4. Stéphane Bouchard, Mylène Laforest, Pedro Gamito, Georgina Cardenas-Lopez
    Pages 103-130
  5. Patrick S. Bordnick, Micki Washburn
    Pages 131-161
  6. Giuseppe Riva, José Gutiérrez-Maldonado, Antonios Dakanalis, Marta Ferrer-García
    Pages 163-193
  7. Hunter G. Hoffman, Walter J. Meyer III, Sydney A. Drever, Maryam Soltani, Barbara Atzori, Rocio Herrero et al.
    Pages 195-208
  8. Dominique Trottier, Mathieu Goyette, Massil Benbouriche, Patrice Renaud, Joanne-Lucine Rouleau, Stéphane Bouchard
    Pages 209-225
  9. Thomas D. Parsons, Albert “Skip” Rizzo
    Pages 247-265
  10. P. J. Standen, David J. Brown
    Pages 267-287
  11. Roos Pot-Kolder, Wim Veling, Willem-Paul Brinkman, Mark van der Gaag
    Pages 289-305
  12. Pierre Nolin, Jérémy Besnard, Philippe Allain, Frédéric Banville
    Pages 307-326
  13. Lindsay A. Yazzolino, Erin C. Connors, Gabriella V. Hirsch, Jaime Sánchez, Lotfi B. Merabet
    Pages 361-385
  14. Thomas Talbot, Albert “Skip” Rizzo
    Pages 387-405
  15. Back Matter

    Pages 407-415

About this book

Introduction

This exciting collection tours virtual reality in both its current therapeutic forms and its potential to transform a wide range of medical and mental health-related fields. Extensive findings track the contributions of VR devices, systems, and methods to accurate assessment, evidence-based and client-centered treatment methods, and—as described in a stimulating discussion of virtual patient technologies—innovative clinical training. Immersive digital technologies are shown enhancing opportunities for patients to react to situations, therapists to process patients’ physiological responses, and scientists to have greater control over test conditions and access to results. Expert coverage details leading-edge applications of VR across a broad spectrum of psychological and neurocognitive conditions, including:

  • Treating anxiety disorders and PTSD.
  • Treating developmental and learning disorders, including Autism Spectrum Disorder,
  • Assessment of and rehabilitation from stroke and traumatic brain injuries.
  • Assessment and treatment of substance abuse.
  • Assessment of deviant sexual interests.
  • Treating obsessive-compulsive and related disorders.
  • Augmenting learning skills for blind persons.

Readable and relevant, Virtual Reality for Psychological and Neurocognitive Interventions is an essential idea book for neuropsychologists, rehabilitation specialists (including physical, speech, vocational, and occupational therapists), and neurologists. Researchers across the behavioral and social sciences will find it a roadmap toward new and emerging areas of study.

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[BOOK Chapter] Assessment and Rehabilitation Using Virtual Reality after Stroke: A Literature Review – Abstract + References

Abstract

This chapter presents the studies that have used virtual reality as an assessment or rehabilitation tool of cognitive functions following a stroke. To be part of this review, publications must have made a collection of data from individuals who have suffered a stroke and must have been published between 1980 and 2017. A total of 50 publications were selected out of a possible 143 that were identified in the following databases: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Psychological and Behavioural Sciences Collection. Overall, we find that most of the studies that have used virtual reality with stroke patients focused on attention, spatial neglect, and executive functions/multitasking. Some studies have focused on route representation, episodic memory, and prospective memory. Virtual reality has been used for training of cognitive functions with stroke patients, but also for their assessment. Overall, the studies support the value and relevance of virtual reality as an assessment and rehabilitation tool with people who have suffered a stroke. Virtual reality seems indeed an interesting way to better describe the functioning of the person in everyday life. Virtual reality also sometimes seems to be more sensitive than traditional approaches for detecting deficits in stroke people. However, it is important to pursue work in this emergent field in clinical neuropsychology.

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[Booklet] Parenting after brain injury – PDF

by Dr Alex Goody

Image result for Parenting after brain injury

This booklet has been written to help those parents
who have had a brain injury understand how their injury
has affected them in their role as a parent.

 

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[Abstract + References] Epilepsy and Anticonvulsant Therapy in Brain Tumor Patients – Book Chapter

Book Chapter

Authors: Sylvia C. Kurz, David Schiff, Patrick Y. Wen

Abstract

Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors and may have a significant impact on quality of life. The actual seizure risk varies based on tumor histology and tumor location. Seizures are most common in patients with glioneuronal tumors and temporal, insular, or frontal lobe tumor location. Antiepileptic drug therapy is indicated in patients with a history of seizure, and the choice of symptomatic treatment should follow the principles of treatment for focal symptomatic epilepsy. In general, antiepileptic drugs that interact with the hepatic CYP450 co-enzymes should be avoided in brain tumor patients if possible due to potential drug-chemotherapy interactions. Levetiracetam represents the antiepileptic drug of choice in patients with brain tumors and has been demonstrated to be efficacious and is well tolerated in brain tumor patients. Lacosamide is an alternative anticonvulsant agent with increasing experience supporting its efficacy and favorable side effect profile.

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via Epilepsy and Anticonvulsant Therapy in Brain Tumor Patients | SpringerLink

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[Book Chapter] Pregnancy and Epilepsy

VD Kapadia – Medical Disorders in Pregnancy

Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder, with 50 million people affected by it worldwide. Nearly 50% of these affected individuals are women. The burden of  epilepsy in women in India is to the tune of 2.73 million, with 52% of them being in …

Continue —> Pregnancy and Epilepsy [PDF]

 

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[Manual] ICF – International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – PDF File

1. Background

This volume contains the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, known as ICF.1 The overall aim of the ICF classification is to provide a unified and standard language and framework for the description of health and health-related states. It defines components of health and some health-related components of well-being (such as education and labour). The domains contained in ICF can, therefore, be seen as health domains and healthrelated domains. These domains are described from the perspective of the body, the individual and society in two basic lists: (1) Body Functions and Structures; and (2) Activities and Participation. 2 As a classification, ICF systematically groups different domains3 for a person in a given health condition (e.g. what a person with a disease or disorder does do or can do). Functioning is an umbrella term encompassing all body functions, activities and participation; similarly, disability serves as an umbrella term for impairments, activity limitations or participation restrictions. ICF also lists environmental factors that interact with all these constructs. In this way, it enables the user to record useful profiles of individuals’ functioning, disability and health in various domains.

ICF belongs to the “family” of international classifications developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) for application to various aspects of health. The WHO family of international classifications provides a framework to code a wide range of information about health (e.g. diagnosis, functioning and disability, reasons for contact with health services) and uses a standardized common language permitting communication about health and health care across the world in various disciplines and sciences. […]

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[BOOK] The Comorbidities of Epilepsy – Google Books

The Comorbidities of Epilepsy

Front Cover
Marco Mula
Academic PressApr 20, 2019 – Medical – 413 pages

Epilepsy is one of most frequent neurological disorders affecting about 50 million people worldwide and 50% of them have at least another medical problem in comorbidity; sometimes this is a the cause of the epilepsy itself or it is due to shared neurobiological links between epilepsy and other medical conditions; other times it is a long-term consequence of the antiepileptic drug treatment.

The Comorbidities of Epilepsy offers an up-to-date, comprehensive overview of all comorbidities of epilepsy (somatic, neurological and behavioral), by international authorities in the field of clinical epileptology, with an emphasis on epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. This book includes also a critical appraisal of the methodological aspects and limitations of current research on this field. Pharmacological issues in the management of comorbidities are discussed, providing information on drug dosages, side effects and interactions, in order to enable the reader to manage these patients safely.

The Comorbidities of Epilepsy is aimed at all health professionals dealing with people with epilepsy including neurologists, epileptologists, psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, epilepsy specialist nurses and clinical researchers.

  • Provides a comprehensive overview of somatic, neurological and behavioral co-morbidities of epilepsy
  • Discusses up-to-date management of comorbidities of epilepsy
  • Written by a group of international experts in the field

 

via The Comorbidities of Epilepsy – Google Books

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[BLOG POST] 10 brain books you should read in 2019

Brain Changer: The Good Mental Health Diet by [Jacka, Felice]

What’s on your “to-read” list this year?

Here are a few books that I’ve read (or plan to in 2019) chosen based on research rigour, chosen, publication date (the last year or two) and practical application. In other words: these books synthesise the most compelling brain science and smart ideas emerging from the research lab and make it relevant for our everyday lives.

Have fun exploring big topics like how our emotions are created, the importance of gut health, the latest on habit formation, understanding the teenage brain, epigenetics, mindfulness, depression and anxiety and the female brain. Happy reading!

1. Brain Changer by Professor Felice Jacka

How is our brain and mental health affected by what we eat? Australian scientist, Felice Jacka uncovers the link between obesity and depression, how gut health impacts brain health and how a Mediterranean diet can keep our brains healthy as we age.

2. The Neuroscience of Mindfulness by Dr Stan Rodski

Where is the proof that mindfulness works? Discover the neuroscience behind mindfulness as Dr Rodski explains how being in the moment can lower stress, increase energy levels, build resilience and protect us from a range of life-threatening illnesses.

3. Mind-Brain-Gene by Dr John Arden

In this groundbreaking book, Arden explores the fascinating world of epigenetics, the immune system and mental health. He takes us on a fascinating journey into the mind-brain-body feedback loops, showing how they influence mental and physical health.

4. Inventing Ourselves by Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore

Blakemore, often credited with pioneering adolescent neurosciences, takes us on a tour through the groundbreaking science behind the enigmatic, but crucial, brain developments of adolescence and how those translate into teenage behaviour. Blakemore demystifies this period of development, outlining what makes the teenage brain unique and why mental illness can develop in these years.

5. Lost Connections by Johann Hari

In his bold and inspiring book, Hari goes on a quest to explore nine different causes of depression and anxiety including disconnection from meaningful work, other people, the natural world and hope. He challenges what we have believed to be true about depression and anxiety and their unexpected solution – reconnection.

6. Atomic Habits by James Clear

How do we create habits that stick? In his book, Clear explores the neuroscience of habit formation, along with proven principles in biology and psychology to offer an effective system for change. According to Clear, it’s the small changes made consistently which compound into life-changing results.

7. How Emotions Are Made by Professor Lisa Feldman Barrett

Barrett shakes up what we have previously thought true about how emotions are created. She challenges the idea that emotions are automatic and hard-wired in certain parts of the brain, using the latest in emotion science to show how emotion is actually created from a complex interplay between our brain, body and culture.

8. From the Laboratory to the Classroom by editors Jared Cooney Horvath, Jason M. Lodge and John Hattie

Are we applying what we know about the neuroscience of learning in the classroom? Horvath’s book combines theory and practice exceptionally well, offering useful strategies based on the science of learning, motivation, attention and memory.

9. Every Note Ever Played by Dr Lisa Genova

From neuroscientist and author of Still Alice, Genova’s latest novel is compelling and thought-provoking. She explores what it means to be truly alive, looking at the way neurological conditions impact identity and relationships. Genova is gifted at bringing to life the struggles experienced by those living with a neurological condition and those who love and care for them.

10. The Women’s Brain Book by Dr Sarah McKay

Of course, how could I not include my own book on this list for must-reads of 2019! My book takes you on a journey through the female lifespan (from womb to tomb) and explores how how brains are shaped by the lives we live, and in turn how how lives are shaped by our neurobiology.

via 10 brain books you should read in 2019 – Your Brain Health

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[BOOK] The Field of Competence of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Physicians

 

The Field of Competence of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Physicians

by Paris Stylianides

Published 4 years ago

219 pages

“The Field of Competence of the Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine physicians” PART ONE European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) Section of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine – Professional Practice Committee

 

 

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[BOOK] Person Centered Approach to Recovery in Medicine – Luigi Grassi – Google Books

Bibliographic information

via Person Centered Approach to Recovery in Medicine – Luigi Grassi – Google Books

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