Archive for category Caregivers

[BLOG] Unconventional Grief: Grieving someone Alive

Grieving Someone Alive


Grieving someone alive is not a conventional form of grief that is often talked about, but is a real issue that is faced by the living. Death is often viewed as the base requirement for grief but mourning the deceased is only one facet of death. If you have never experienced this, you likely do not understand what we’re talking about. How can you grieve for someone that you haven’t lost? If you have experience this sort of grief, you probably are cheering inside your head that someone has finally put to words what you’re feeling.

Grieving for someone alive, is not the same as anticipatory grief. Anticipatory grief is the type of grief that comes about when you know that you will soon be experiencing a loss, such as when a loved one is dying or in the hospital. If you are experiencing anticipatory grief or looking for resources on it, please visit the following link:


If you’re not familiar with this form of grief, you may be unsure how this is possible or what often triggers this form of grief in people. Often, this form of grief is caused by a loved one becoming someone that you no longer know or recognize.


• Mental Illness
• Drug or Substance Addiction
• Dementia or Alzheimer’s
• Brain Injury
• Family Trauma

The unfortunate truth of grieving someone alive is that they are still there as the person you once knew but psychologically are a different person than they were before. Also, many of these factors are outside of the control of the person experiencing them or the person who is watching their loved one suffer. It can be hard for either party to recognize because the person does not always look like they are sick.
Don’t look at these causes and think that they mean that you love this person any less though. This form of grief, just like grieving someone who is deceased, does not change the level of attachment to the person. Simply, this person is no longer acting how they were before and have had a dramatic shift in personality. If your brother is suffering from a drug addiction, his behavior may become erratic and he might start stealing from yourself or other family members. Some will grieve the life that he is not living as he focuses living for his addiction. If someone is dealing with a mental illness, they may now be dealing with depression so badly that they are unable to go on living their life or they may be experiencing delusions or hallucinations.
A person will experience many emotions while grieving someone alive. These emotions may be more powerful and more confusing than the grieving process for someone who has recently passed. Anger is a prominent emotion that shows up. The grieving individual could feel anger towards their loved one for the issues they are dealing with and have a hard time understanding that they may not be able to change, such as in the case of mental illness. While experiencing anger, you may feel guilty as well that you are experiencing anger or guilty that you cannot control or change the situation.
Unlike when someone dies, you are unlikely to experience positive emotions while grieving someone alive. When someone passes, you are surrounded by the comfort of their loved ones and are often able to look at the joy of their life. This rarely happens with unconventional or ambiguous grief. Just like when someone dies, you are likely to be overcome with sadness. However, the reminder of your sadness is constant every time you think of this person or hear about them.

How to Grieve Someone Alive

• Let yourself grieve. Don’t attempt to hide or suppress your grief for this situation just because society or your loved ones don’t understand or acknowledge what you’re going through. Be open to sharing how your feeling to close family and friends and don’t push yourself to be someone you’re not at this time.
• Find other people in the same situation. Connecting with other people who are experiencing the same kind of personal loss as you is an invaluable resource. This can come in the form of a support group or finding an individual to speak with. Having someone understand what it is like to be grieving someone  alive will help to put your situation in perspective and help you to gain insight on the validity of your feelings.
• Don’t forget your memories or the past. When you are experiencing ambiguous or unconventional grief, it is easy to forget why and how you previously loved someone in the midst of their hurtful behavior. Remind yourself of the good times that you had and why you originally loved them. It is okay to cherish old moments and mourn that they are gone. Remember that that person is still here though, just not at the moment.
• Open yourself up to change. One of the hardest parts of grieving someone alive is that you are forced to accept a changed relationship that you do not want. It may be difficult for you to look on a loved one in a different life, but you may be able to experience a rewarding relationship with them in new ways than before. Focusing on finding joy in your new relationship will help keep your mental state positive rather than gloomy.
• Always remember that the illness is not the person. For many people, this is the hardest mental hurdle to overcome while grieving someone alive. Stop yourself from thinking of your loved one as the disease they’re dealing with, whether it be addiction, Alzheimer’s, or depression. You will still likely feel angry towards the person but understanding what they’re actually dealing with can help you process some of those feeling.

Unconventional Grief, Ambiguous Grief, or grieving someone alive are all very real and pertinent forms of grief that need to be treated, understood and addressed. Become a member of The American Academy of Bereavement today to find more resources on grief.

via Unconventional Grief: Grieving someone Alive


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[BOOK] Epilepsy Across the Spectrum – NCBI Bookshelf

Cover of Epilepsy Across the Spectrum

Epilepsy Across the Spectrum

Promoting Health and Understanding

Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on the Public Health Dimensions of the Epilepsies; Editors: Mary Jane England, Catharyn T Liverman, Andrea M Schultz, and Larisa M Strawbridge.

Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2012.

ISBN-13: 978-0-309-25506-6


Throughout this report, the committee emphasizes the ways in which epilepsy is a spectrum disorder. Epilepsy comprises more than 25 syndromes and many types of seizures that vary in severity. Additionally, people who have epilepsy span a spectrum that includes men and women of all ages and of all socioeconomic backgrounds and races/ethnicities, who live in all areas of the United States and across the globe. The impacts on physical health and quality of life encompass a spectrum as well, with individuals experiencing different health outcomes and having a range of activities of daily living that may be affected, including driving, academic achievement, social interactions, and employment. For some people, epilepsy is a childhood disorder that goes into remission (although the seizures may have lifelong consequences), while for others it is a lifelong burden or a condition that develops later in life or in response to an injury or other health condition. These many complexities of epilepsy make it a challenging health condition to convey to the general public to promote understanding and alleviate stigma. This report aims to provide evidence and impetus for actions that will improve the lives of people with epilepsy and their families.


via Epilepsy Across the Spectrum – NCBI Bookshelf

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[BLOG] Who Am I Now? Loss of Self after TBI – Brain Injury Blog With Free TBI Information

Loss of self is one of the biggest hurdles that TBI Survivors face

March, 2018

By Bill Herrin

When a loved one dies, friends and family bear the brunt of the loss. There are rituals for their grief and mourning. As they go on with their lives, they hope and often expect that the pain will fade with time. They are often told, “Give yourself time” or “Don’t make any major decisions now” and “It will get easier.” They are expected to feel sad, upset, and even angry after a death. But they are also expected to move on with their lives, no matter how difficult or painful it is.

Everything Has Changed

But when a person has a traumatic brain injury, their family faces new and different challenges. They have lost many of the things that they knew and loved about the Survivor. Their relationship with the Survivor has changed and so have their expectations and dreams for the future. While the physical, cognitive, behavioral, social and  even financial changes may be most evident, there’s something else that’s harder to define.  That’s the loss of self that the Survivor of a TBI faces. “Who am I now?” is the critical question. “What gives meaning to my life now?” Then there is the uncertainty of whether it’s even possible to reclaim your old life when so much has changed? While most everyone tries to overcome loss of self, some succeed…some cannot.

Necessity is the Mother of Reinvention

Hilary Zayed, who survived her brain injury, knows how difficult finding your new self can be. Her story is one of a huge transition described in her book, Reinventing Oneself After Loss.  Her artwork became a vehicle as she explored who she had become since her injury and how she rebuilt her identity, mourning her loss of self, and slowly regaining her new sense of self. Everyone will have different goals and different results. It’s not necessarily finding what makes you happy (though it helps), but more importantly, it’s finding what gives your life meaning now. This is the first step toward such a huge change. Finding a catalyst that drives you forward toward your reinvention can be incredibly motivating. Think about what makes you feel fulfilled, satisfied and meaningful and consider how that could become a part of your life after TBI.

There is no set timetable or deadlines for reinventing your self. Survivor Garry Prowe’s tips on Living a Full Life after Brain Injury, admits that the initial steps to finding your new life may sound obvious – dealing with a roller coaster of emotions, feeling overwhelmed, angry, and depressed along with financial stress, unemployment, social isolation, and life style changes. But the greatest stress may be the uncertainty of the future as the path and extent of recovery is unpredictable. However, the road to reinvention has to start somewhere. It can take months and even years until you feel ready to work on reinventing your sense of self. Once you’ve been able to self-assess your strengths and capabilities, you’ll have a much better idea of your new direction as you begin the process of rebuilding. Prowe’s tip card is an inexpensive resource ($1) that outlines the many steps of recovery with contacts/resources/ideas for you. (You can sign up to receive a free catalog and tip card from Lash & Associates – and choose his tip card “Living a Full Life after Brain Injury at this link).

Different Paths for Different People

As life goes on, be encouraged by the many who have been in your shoes and traveled your journey. Jeff Sebell, also a survivor,  worked on “getting his power back” after his brain injury by focusing on regaining his self confidence, re-learning how to make decisions, and taking action steps toward living the life he wanted. Sounds simple, right? Of course it’s not at all, but Jeff shares an incredibly insightful peek into his “Modus Operandi” in this blog post, and also in his book “Learning to Live with Yourself after Brain Injury.” Jeff’s take on having a better life is based on how you choose to interpret the things that happen on a daily basis. This can make the difference between having a good day or a bad one. Just using this as a starting point can move your life in a more positive direction! We don’t have control over what happens to us, but we can interpret and judge its impact on us – and try to see the big picture. Jeff reminds us that TBI, and loss of self, doesn’t have to leave you powerless. Rather you can regain control over your life by working on positivity and determination. The results will follow. Your loss of self will soon become transforming…you’ll find that you’ve discovered your “new normal.”

There are no set rules for this rediscovery. We all have very different paths after a brain injury. Some of these paths may criss-cross and you may share common experiences and feelings with other survivors. However, navigating through the maze of traumatic brain injury requires self-determination, finding your strengths, setting some incremental goals for your life, and making the commitment to start working toward them.

Lash and Associates’ award winning blog site (on our website) offers hundreds of absolutely free blog articles by TBI experts and clinicians, TBI survivors, and family members that share insights as well. A well-rounded offering of insights from every possible angle – including more on the subject of today’s bulletin – loss of self. Lash & Associates is also a leading publisher of books, cognitive software, and more – all for the brain injury community. Just click the two award icons, or CLICK HERE to see our entire blog article collection!

via Who Am I Now? Loss of Self after TBI – Brain Injury Blog With Free TBI Information

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[Abstract] Family-led rehabilitation after stroke in India (ATTEND): a randomised controlled trial



Most people with stroke in India have no access to organised rehabilitation services. The effectiveness of training family members to provide stroke rehabilitation is uncertain. Our primary objective was to determine whether family-led stroke rehabilitation, initiated in hospital and continued at home, would be superior to usual care in a low-resource setting.


The Family-led Rehabilitation after Stroke in India (ATTEND) trial was a prospectively randomised open trial with blinded endpoint done across 14 hospitals in India. Patients aged 18 years or older who had had a stroke within the past month, had residual disability and reasonable expectation of survival, and who had an informal family-nominated caregiver were randomly assigned to intervention or usual care by site coordinators using a secure web-based system with minimisation by site and stroke severity. The family members of participants in the intervention group received additional structured rehabilitation training—including information provision, joint goal setting, carer training, and task-specific training—that was started in hospital and continued at home for up to 2 months. The primary outcome was death or dependency at 6 months, defined by scores 3–6 on the modified Rankin scale (range, 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]) as assessed by masked observers. Analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials Registry-India (CTRI/2013/04/003557), Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613000078752), and Universal Trial Number (U1111-1138-6707).


Between Jan 13, 2014, and Feb 12, 2016, 1250 patients were randomly assigned to intervention (n=623) or control (n=627) groups. 33 patients were lost to follow-up (14 intervention, 19 control) and five patients withdrew (two intervention, three control). At 6 months, 285 (47%) of 607 patients in the intervention group and 287 (47%) of 605 controls were dead or dependent (odds ratio 0·98, 95% CI 0·78–1·23, p=0·87). 72 (12%) patients in the intervention group and 86 (14%) in the control group died (p=0·27), and we observed no difference in rehospitalisation (89 [14%]patients in the intervention group vs 82 [13%] in the control group; p=0·56). We also found no difference in total non-fatal events (112 events in 82 [13%] intervention patients vs 110 events in 79 [13%] control patients; p=0·80).


Although task shifting is an attractive solution for health-care sustainability, our results do not support investment in new stroke rehabilitation services that shift tasks to family caregivers, unless new evidence emerges. A future avenue of research should be to investigate the effects of task shifting to health-care assistants or team-based community care.


The National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.

This article is available free of charge.

Simply login to access the full article, or register for free if you do not yet have a username and password.


via Family-led rehabilitation after stroke in India (ATTEND): a randomised controlled trial – The Lancet

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[BLOG POST] You Probably Didn’t Aware Of These Surprising Epileptic Seizure Causes

Epileptic Seizure Causes

Epileptic Seizure has no known cause in about half of those with the condition. In the other, the condition may be traced to various factors.

Genetic influence. Some types of epilepsy, which are categorized by the type of seizure you experience or the part of the brain that is affected, run in families. In these cases, it’s likely that there’s a genetic effect.

Researchers have associated some types of this disorder to specific genes that Epileptic Seizure Causes, also include genes though it’s estimated that up to 500 genes could be tied to the condition. For most people, genes are only part of the cause of this disorder. Certain genes may make a person more sensitive to environmental conditions that provoke seizures.

Head trauma. Epileptic Seizure Causes by Head trauma as a result of a car accident or other traumatic injury.

Brain conditions. Brain conditions that cause damage to the brain, such as brain tumors or strokes, can cause Epileptic Seizure. Stroke is a leading cause of epilepsy in adults older than age 35.


via You Probably Didn’t Aware Of These Surprising Epileptic Seizure Causes

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[WEB SITE] Epilepsy in children: tips on letting your child be independent with epilepsy

epilepsy in childrenLetting your child have the right amount of freedom can be difficult for any parent, but when you throw the unpredictability of epilepsy into the mix, things can get really challenging!

Despite this, becoming more independent is a crucial part of growing up for any child. It is important that you are not overly controlling with your child so that, in time, they can become good decision-makers in their own right and will be able to manage their epilepsy themselves.

In this blog post, we give you some helpful tips on letting your child be independent in spite of their epilepsy

Learn as much as you can about epilepsy

Firstly, to encourage and support your child in their epilepsy journey, you must learn as much as you can about the condition. Then you can discuss epilepsy openly and honestly with your child, and establish where boundaries need to be set.

Don’t let your child’s epilepsy define them

However, it’s important not to let your child’s epilepsy define them. Try not to think of your child as sick or fragile because of their condition – hopefully you will soon reach the stage where their epilepsy is manageable.

Your child’s achievements in life and their general well-being are far more important than their epilepsy, and it is important to remember this when deciding what they can and can’t do.

child on a bicycleDon’t rule out independent sports or activities

You might think that certain sports and activities such as cycling or swimming are off limits to your child living with epilepsy. However, it’s always worth consulting your child’s doctor or paediatrician before ruling them out completely – sports can be a great opportunity for your child to gain independence and to make friends.

While some activities may have to be limited (particularly when seizures are unpredictable), it’s important for your child to have as many of the same opportunities as their peers as possible.


Thankfully, technology is available that can make day-to-day living much easier. There are now products thatcan really help to settle your mind about your child’s safety, and allow them to gain the independence they need.

For example, seizure alarms make it possible to always know when your child has a seizure and be able to react accordingly even if you aren’t with them.

Another great solution is the anti-suffocation pillow. These ensure that, if your child has a seizure in the night, they will still be able to breathe. This allows you to be at ease, and your child to have more independence.

If you are a parent of a child living with epilepsy, why not let other parents know any tips or advice that you have in the comments below…


via Epilepsy in children: tips on letting your child be independent with epilepsy |

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[WEB SITE] Neurosexuality Needs to Be Better Addressed in Patients with Neurodisabilities

Summary: Experts raise awareness of neurosexuality challenges faced by patients with neurodisabilities, including members of the LGBTQIA+ community, and provide guidance for healthcare providers and caregivers.

For people with brain disorders, whether from injury or disease, rehabilitation is a complex process. Neurosexuality is an emerging area of study and practice that focuses on the relationships between brain and sexual function in individuals with and without neurological disorders. Experts on the subject, reporting in NeuroRehabilitation, discuss how sexuality can affect neurorehabilitation in patients suffering from a range of conditions, from stroke and spinal cord injuries to sexual behavior in patients with dementia.

Research addressing the relationship between sexuality and the brain has a long history in neurological and behavioral sciences. This increased awareness has led to a better understanding within the scientific community regarding the importance of sexuality as a health outcome to promote the quality of life of individuals with neurodisabilities.

“This thematic issue of NeuroRehabilitation emphasizes that neurosexuality care should be driven by a transdisciplinary approach to appraise the evidence base of the potential negative consequences of different neurodisabilities on sexuality and to build upon sound treatment strategies to address these complexities,” explained guest editors Alexander Moreno, PhD, Caron Gan, RN, MScN, RP, AAMFT, and Nathan D. Zasler, MD.

An important contribution to this issue advocates for changing the culture of neurodisability through language and sensitivity of providers in order to create a safe place for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, and people with other sexual orientations and forms of gender expression (LGBTQIA+). “The particular needs of LGBTQIA+ individuals living with a neurological disorder are neglected in clinical practice and research. The invisibility of LGBTQIA+ individuals with neurological disorders reflects the historical exclusion of marginalized identities and creates disparities of access to healthcare,” explained Alexander Moreno, PhD, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Sexology, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQÀM) and the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Ari Laoch, MS, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Nathan D. Zasler, MD, Concussion Care Centre of Virginia, Ltd. and Tree of Life Services, Inc. (VA).

The invisibility of LGBTQIA+ individuals with neurological disorders translates into diminished quality of care or inappropriate care, lack of recognition of all family configurations, exclusion of family caregivers, and violations of human rights (e.g., the right to be treated with dignity). Shedding light on the diversity of individuals with neurological disorders has the potential to improve healthcare by helping rehabilitation professionals to be sensitive to the particular needs of LGBTQIA+ individuals. In addition, the results of this study help promote the inclusion of sexual and gender diversity in the curricula of future practitioners and delineate future directions for research. Most importantly, the current study provides concrete clinical recommendations aiming to orient healthcare professionals wanting to improve their practice.

The authors surveyed the literature concerning neurological disorders affecting LGBTQIA+ individuals. They found that the relative neglect of LGBTQIA+ individuals with neurological disorders in clinical practice and research is striking. Healthcare professionals working with individuals with neurological disorders have the responsibility to create safer spaces in their clinical practice, including the use of inclusive language, the modification of admission forms to reflect diverse realities, the inclusion of sexual orientation and gender identity in their institutional policies, and participate in continuing education to challenge misconceptions, stereotypes, and negative attitudes. The authors provide 20 recommendations to guide clinicians, researchers, and policy professionals about the care of the LGBTQIA+ community.

Moreno, Laoch, and Zasler emphasized that “being part of a positive change in the rehabilitation of LGBTQIA+ people with neurodisabilities is part of our obligation as healthcare providers who are self-reflective, critical, and willing to improve the quality of the services provided in an ethical framework.”

Additional contributions to the issue cover a variety of important topics.

Sexual Health After Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

The authors reviewed over 2000 studies and found that literature about sexuality in children and adolescents with ABI has mainly addressed physical issues (e.g., precocious puberty), with positive sexual health needing further development in topics such as body image, sexual orientation, and social competence including flirting, dating, and romance.

Sexual health after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in younger and older adults Sexual problems were more likely for older (average mid-40s) patients with TBI than for younger (average 30s) patients. Older patients showed lower sexual desire and suffered more from anxiety and depression. Younger patients did not exhibit these symptoms to the same degree, suggesting that clinicians should be aware of age differences when treating their patients.

Stroke and Sexual Functioning

A literature review of post-stroke sexual functioning describes how various dysfunctions are related to stroke location, laterality, and physical and psychological changes. Three programs are presented to address post-stroke rehabilitation.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Sexual Dysfunction

For patients with MS, assessment and treatment of sexual dysfunctions are described, including sexual assessment tools especially for MS. The authors also explore related topics including relationships, fertility, pregnancy, and parenting issues. They emphasize that, like other neurological disorders, there is a need for more collaboration among providers in addressing sexual concerns in MS.

How perceptions of sexuality in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) can affect care

Surveys of both patients with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, and ALS care providers revealed uncomfortable feelings when the subject of sexuality was raised. The authors call for more education among ALS specialists in sexuality and a policy change that guarantees the inclusion of sexuality in their guidelines.

Sexual Concerns After Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

SCI can impact sexual response, male infertility and its treatments, as well as pregnancy issues. The authors emphasize the importance of providing education and specific sexual recommendations based on the individual’s remaining sexual potential, and to include their partners, when available. They also present basic and advanced treatments for sexual dysfunctions and discuss other challenges in the management of sexual dysfunction of individuals with SCI.

Studying Intimacy And Sexuality In Clients With Dementia

Obtaining consent to study individuals with cognitive impairment is a controversial topic. In the environment of a residential care facility, the authors propose a multi-step approach involving authorized representatives (e.g., family caregivers), professional caregivers working in the facility, a pre-consent phase, a consent presentation phase, and a final consent before data collection. Their reflections and suggestions illuminate the ethical challenges involved in the study of sexuality and intimacy in individuals with severe cognitive impairment.

In summary, the guest editors write, “We hope that this thematic issue provides an impetus for rehabilitation and other health professionals, students in the health sciences, and researchers to develop their competence and awareness of the importance of sexual neurorehabilitation in persons with neurodisabilities.”

Similar Topics

via Neurosexuality Needs to Be Better Addressed in Patients with Neurodisabilities – SexualDiversity.Org

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[BLOG POST] Flying with a brain injury: my first long flight – Finding a new normal

Flying is my least favourite mode of transportation. Unfortunately it’s also the most convenient way to travel outside of Europe.

After my brain injury I was very curious about whether or not I’d still be able to fly (by myself). This called for an experiment.

Trying out flying

My first flight was a year and a half after my brain injury. At that time I could handle far less compared to the situation now. I had far less energy and got overstimulated very easily. Or maybe I had yet to discover how I should handle the ‘new me’.

So I avoided places with a lot of people. As fifteen minutes in a busy place would deteriorate my speech, thinking and balance quickly. Flying thus was written of in advance.

Luckily someone told me about the special assistence you can request when you plan to fly. This service makes it easier for people with any kind of disability to travel by plane. Once requested in advance, someone will escort you all the way into the plane. Which means that you get a lot faster through the airport and can save some precious energy. This service made flying suddenly a possibility.

And as a result I had two succesful flights within Europe. Which meant that it was time for the next step. To take a long flight and to try it without any kind of assistance.

A ten hour flight

That long flight was my flight to Sri Lanka last week. This time, not the airport but the flight itself was the most challenging. In the airport I had my earplugs, noise cancelling headphones and sunglasses and could hide out in a quiet corner. I even made a reservation for an airport lounge to rest in, which almost made me forget I was at an airport.

In the plane however, you can’t leave. Blocking out the world is a whole lot harder if there’s nowhere for you to go. This made the flight challenging, thought the last three hours of turbulance might also be to blame. Still I learned some lessons for my next flight in five weeks.

Know your triggers

I always find travel days extremely stressful. Nine out of ten times this culminates in a panic attack. This time was no different. Thankfully I recognised I was having a panic attack early on, so I could do something about it.

Follow your gut

If you notice that you stress yourself out over something, try and do something about it. I kept chaecking my watch every other minute, because I was afraid to be late. After an hour of annoying myself I finally decided to just go to the airport way too early. Looking back I should have done that earlier.

Plan your route

Nowadays, I think you can find the map of almost all airports online. This means that you can plan where to go in advance. Knowing where the lounges, quiet areas or prayer rooms are located beforehand can give you some piece of mind. Once you’ve passed security at the airport you already know the shortest way to where you plan to rest.

Keep a choice of distractions ready

Once you’re seated in the plane, it’s a matter of sitting it through. Of waiting until the plane has landed and you can get off. I discovered that I can’t read or watch tv on a plane. My mp3 player is therefore filled with different kinds of music. Music to sleep, to distract or to cancel out other noises. Make sure you have the option of distractions for the duration of the flight.

Keep yourself hydrated

Any time you get offered a drink on the plane, take it. Not only will it help you to stay hydrated (so don’t pick an alcoholic drink) it’ll force you to go to the toilet. In other words to stand up and walk around.

After care

The second or third day after the flight, I’ll feel the consequences. So listen to your body. If you need to sleep for 12 hours, do that. If you crave sugary or salty snacks, have those. Flying is hard and challenging, so take some recovery days into account and allow yourself some rest.

– I can only speak from my own exprience, so do check with your doctor if you have specific requirements to take into account when flying –

What do you do when you fly? Do you have or need something special that really helps you?

via Flying with a brain injury: my first long flight – Finding a new normal

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[WEB SITE] Griswold Home Care Launches Website for Caregivers

Published on

Griswold Home Care, a provider of services to help adults age in place, launches, a website designed to offer resources, tips, and inspiration to professional, volunteer, and family caregivers.

The website also links to pages of the Institute for Professional Care Education (IPCed) and the Family Caregiver Alliance, a nonprofit support group for caregivers.

Additional features include quotes and testimonials from professional and nonprofessional caregivers, career and salary information, job openings within Griswold Home Care, and a feature called “Ask Allegra,” in which 35-year GHC caregiver Allegra Chaney shares advice in response to visitors’ questions, according to a media release from Griswold Home Care.

“Griswold Home Care has long been committed to ensuring quality care for our clients, going back to our company’s founding by Jean Griswold, and we’ve taken that wealth of collective experience to assist caregivers both within and outside of the Griswold family,” said Matt Murphy, president and CEO of Griswold Home Care, in the release.

“We developed to be a lighthouse and source of information for caregivers and those looking to enter the field.”

[Source(s): Griswold Home Care, Business Wire]


via Griswold Home Care Launches Website for Caregivers – Rehab Managment

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[WEB SITE] Coping With Emotional Changes After Stroke for Families

Coping With Emotional Changes After Stroke-blog

As a stroke survivor, you can face major life changes. In the aftermath of a stroke, you may experience a sense of loss that is rooted in the feeling that you’ve lost the life you had before your stroke, or your independence. These strong emotional reactions take a toll.

It is normal to experience emotions ranging from frustration, anxiety, and depression to a sense of grief, or even guilt, anger, and denial after such a monumental change. Realizing that these emotions are normal, and that you are not alone in experiencing them, is an important step to acknowledging and coping with them in a healthy way. By doing this, you avoid becoming overwhelmed, thus avoiding further difficulties during your recovery.

Reasons for Emotional Changes After a Stroke

Young Man At Balcony In Depression Suffering Emotional Crisis And Grief

A stroke causes physical damage to your brain. Feeling or behaving differently after a stroke may be connected to the area of your brain that was damaged. If the area of your brain that controls personality or emotion is affected, you may be susceptible to changes in your emotional response or everyday behavior. Strokes may also cause emotional distress due to the suddenness of their occurrence. As with any traumatic life experience, it may take time for you to accept and adapt to the emotional trauma of having experienced a stroke.

Emotional Changes a Stroke Might Cause

PseudoBulbar Affect


Sometimes referred to as “reflex crying,” “emotional lability,” or “labile mood,” Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA) is a symptom of damage to the area of the brain that controls expression of emotions. Characteristics of the disorder include rapid changes in mood, such as suddenly bursting into tears and stopping just as suddenly, or even beginning to laugh at inappropriate times.



If you are feeling sad, hopeless, or helpless after having suffered a stroke, you may be experiencing depression. Other symptoms of depression may include irritability or changes to your eating and sleeping habits. Talk to your doctor if you are experiencing any of these symptoms, as it may be necessary to treat with prescription antidepressants or therapy to avoid it becoming a road block to your recovery.



Anxiety is quite common after a stroke. You may have feelings of uneasiness or fears about your health; this is normal and healthy. However, if your anxiety does not subside in time and you feel overwhelmed, you may be dealing with an anxiety disorder, which requires help from your doctor or a mental health professional.

Medical staff will perform an informal evaluation to check for anxiety while you are in the hospital. Often, this involves a quick discussion with hospital staff, during which they will ask you if you have any worries or fears about your health. This evaluation may also involve hospital staff asking your family members if they have noticed a change in your mood or behavior. It is important that you are kept in the loop about any issues that may present themselves, and that you are provided with as much information about your health and treatment options as possible.

Symptoms of anxiety to watch for may include irritability or trouble concentrating. You may also experience trouble sleeping due to your mind racing about your health. Sometimes, you can become tired easily, even if well rested.

Physical symptoms may also present themselves. These symptoms include a racing heart and restlessness and are often coupled with a sense of overwhelming worry or dread. If you find yourself avoiding your normal activities, such as grocery shopping, visiting friends, going for walks, or spending a large portion of your day dwelling on things you are worried about, you may have an anxiety disorder. Your doctor can recommend that you visit a psychologist to help cope with and eventually overcome anxiety.

Other Emotional Reactions

You may experience a range of other emotional reactions after a stroke, including anger and frustration. Additional symptoms may be a sense of apathy or a lack of motivation to accomplish things you typically enjoy.

Coping With Changing Emotions

Physician Ready To Examine Patient And Help

There are many ways to treat the emotional changes associated with a stroke. The first step is discussing how you feel, as well as any concerns you may have about your health with your doctor. One treatment option is counseling, which involves speaking about your distressing thoughts and feelings with a mental health professional or therapist. Simply talking about the way you are feeling can be helpful when coping with overwhelming emotions after experiencing a traumatic event such as a stroke.

Your doctor may also prescribe antidepressants or anti-anxiety medication to help you deal with the emotions involved with a stroke. While they are not a cure-all for emotional troubles, antidepressants change the levels of certain chemicals in your brain, alleviating the symptoms of depression and anxiety, lifting your mood, and making life feel more bearable while you’re recovering. It is important to stay in contact with your doctor if you decide to take medication, as it will not be effective for everyone and may have unpleasant side effects.

Seek Support or Professional Advice

A stroke can come on suddenly and have a monumental effect on your life. For this reason, it is common for many patients to struggle with emotional side effects following a stroke. You may suffer damage to the section of your brain that affects emotions, causing a change in personality or emotional expression known as Pseudobulbar Affect. You may also experience symptoms of anxiety or depression, along with feelings of anger, frustration, or uncharacteristic apathy.

It is important to discuss your emotional concerns with your doctor. You may need a prescription for antidepressants or anti-anxiety medication, or a recommendation to see a mental health professional who can help you form healthy coping mechanisms.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

via Coping With Emotional Changes After Stroke for Families

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