Archive for category FES

[Abstract] Towards an ankle neuroprosthesis for hybrid robotics: Concepts and current sources for functional electrical stimulation

Abstract:

Hybrid rehabilitation robotics combine neuro-prosthetic devices (close-loop functional electrical stimulation systems) and traditional robotic structures and actuators to explore better therapies and promote a more efficient motor function recovery or compensation. Although hybrid robotics and ankle neuroprostheses (NPs) have been widely developed over the last years, there are just few studies on the use of NPs to electrically control both ankle flexion and extension to promote ankle recovery and improved gait patterns in paretic limbs. The aim of this work is to develop an ankle NP specifically designed to work in the field of hybrid robotics. This article presents early steps towards this goal and makes a brief review about motor NPs and Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) principles and most common devices used to aid the ankle functioning during the gait cycle. It also shows a current sources analysis done in this framework, in order to choose the best one for this intended application.

Source: Towards an ankle neuroprosthesis for hybrid robotics: Concepts and current sources for functional electrical stimulation – IEEE Xplore Document

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[VIDEO] WalkAide® Demonstration – YouTube

Published on Mar 29, 2012

WalkAide® patient Connie Fowble demonstrates how the Walkaide® benefits her daily life. She shows the previous orthotic device that she used prior to being fit with the Walkaide®. For more information call 877-4HANGER or visit http://www.hanger.com.

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[Technology News] Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market 2017 – Bioness INC, Otto Bock, Odstock Medical Limited 

Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market studies the competitive landscape view of the industry. The Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) report also includes development plans and policies along with manufacturing processes. The major regions involved in Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market are (United States, EU, China, and Japan).

For Sample Copy Of The Report Click Here: http://qyresearch.us/report/global-functional-electrical-stimulation-device-fes-market-2017/41817/#inquiry

Leading Manufacturers Analysis in Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market 2017:

1 Bioness INC
2 Otto Bock
3 Odstock Medical Limited
4 Trulife
5 XFT
6 MotoMed

Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market: Type Segment Analysis

Wire
Wireless

Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market: Applications Segment Analysis

Personal FES
Commercial FES

The Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) report does the thorough study of the key industry players to understand their business strategies, annual revenue, company profile and their contribution to the global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market share. Diverse factors of the Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) industry like the supply chain scenario, industry standards, import/export details are also mentioned in Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market 2017 report.

Key Highlights of the Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market:

A Clear understanding of the Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market based on growth, constraints, opportunities, feasibility study.

Concise Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market study based on major geographical regions.

Analysis of evolving market segments as well as a complete study of existing Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market segments.

Discover More About Report Here: http://qyresearch.us/report/global-functional-electrical-stimulation-device-fes-market-2017/41817/

Furthermore, distinct aspects of Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market like the technological development, economic factors, opportunities and threats to the growth of Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market are covered in depth in this report. The performance of Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market during 2017 to 2022 is being forecasted in this report.

In conclusion, Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market 2017 report presents the descriptive analysis of the parent market based on elite players, present, past and futuristic data which will serve as a profitable guide for all the Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) industry competitors.

Source: Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market 2017 – Bioness INC, Otto Bock, Odstock Medical Limited | The First Newshawk

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[WEB SITE] Research report explores the foot drop implants market

Foot drop can be defined as an abnormality in the gait where the forefoot drops due to factors such as weakness of the ankle and toe dorsiflexion. The abnormality is also caused by paralysis of the muscles in the anterior portion of the lower leg or damage to the fibular nerve.

Foot drop can be associated with various conditions, including peripheral nerve injuries, neuropathies, drug toxicities, dorsiflexor injuries, and diabetes. Anatomic, muscular, and neurologic are the three categories of foot drop.

Functional electrical stimulation technology is employed in the foot drop implant to improve the gait of patients and avoid foot drop or tripping while walking. Functional electric stimulators (FES) can either be implanted within the patient’s body or employed externally.External FES is tested on the patient prior to its implantation. Implant FES involves a surgery in which the electrodes are directly placed on the nerves of the patient, which are controlled by the implant placed under the skin.

The FES device activates the implant through a wireless antenna that is worn outside the body. Sensors are also associated with FES which trigger events in the walking pattern such as lifting of the heel, thereby stimulating the nerves.

Obtain Report Details at
www.transparencymarketresearch.com/foot-drop-implants-market.html

The advantages of implant FES include reduction in sensation that is associated with external stimulation. In addition, it eliminates the need to adjust the electrodes on the skin on a daily basis.

Rise in number of foot drop disorders due to nerve injuries, growth in knee and hip replacement therapies that lead to foot drop disorders, and increase in the number of sports related injuries contribute to the growth of the foot drop implants market. Foot drop disorders are commonly observed in diabetic retinopathy patients and this prevalence is growing due to increase in incidence of diabetes, which is propelling the growth of the market.

Furthermore, the market players are focus on research and development to increase the number of foot drop implant products available in the market, driving the market growth. However, lack of reimbursement, high cost of the implants, and low awareness among the people are likely to hinder the growth of the foot drop implants market in the near future.

The global foot drop implants market can be segmented on the basis of product, end-user, and region. On the basis of product, the market is categorized into functional electrical stimulators and internal fixation devices.

The internal fixation devices segment is anticipated to record a significant growth during the forecast period owing to increasing demand for the devices and advantages offered by these devices such as elimination of the need to stimulate the electrodes daily. Based on end-user, the market can be segmented into hospitals, orthopedic centers, and palliative care centers, among others.

The orthopedic centers segment is anticipated to record a high growth during the forecast period due to the increasing number of foot drop cases due to injuries.

Geographically, the foot drop implants market is distributed over North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Middle East & Africa. North America dominated the market in 2016 and is anticipated to continue its dominance during the forecast period.

The significant growth of the market in the region can be attributed to the strong focus on research and development, increase in health care spending, and growth in awareness about the abnormality. The sluggish economy might have a negative impact on the market growth of Europe.

Asia Pacific is anticipated to record a high CAGR during the forecast period, primarily driven by India and China. The rising disposable income is anticipated to contribute to the growth of the Asia Pacific market.

In addition, a factor contributing to the market growth is rise in prevalence of diabetes that leads to diabetic retinopathy, which is one of the primary causes of foot drop.

Key players operating in the foot drop implants market include Finetech Medical, Arthrex, Inc., Zimmer Biomet, Bioness Inc., Stryker Corporation, Wright Medical Group N.V., Ottobock, Narang Medical Limited, PONTiS Orthopaedics, LLC, and Shanghai MicroPort Orthopedics.

The report offers a comprehensive evaluation of the market. It does so via in-depth qualitative insights, historical data, and verifiable projections about market size.

The projections featured in the report have been derived using proven research methodologies and assumptions. By doing so, the research report serves as a repository of analysis and information for every facet of the market, including but not limited to: Regional markets, technology, types, and applications.

Report:
www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=B&rep_id=22913

Source: Research report explores the foot drop implants market – WhaTech

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[WEB SITE] The WalkAide System for Treatment of Foot Drop

Discover how The WalkAide System can change lives by helping patients with Foot Drop gain greater mobility and freedom by managing this challenging condition. If your Foot Drop is caused by Multiple Sclerosis, Stroke, Cerebral Palsy, Spinal Cord Injury, or even Traumatic Brain Injury, you may be a candidate for The WalkAide System. The WalkAide System is a sophisticated FDA cleared medical device that uses advanced tilt-sensor technology to analyze the movement of your leg. The WalkAide System uses gentle stimulation to activate leg muscles and prompt your foot to lift with every step, resulting in a more natural walking pattern with less fatigue.

  • • Multiple Sclerosis
  • • Stroke
  • • Cerebral Palsy
  • • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • • Spinal Cord Injury

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[WEB SITE] FDA Approves WP-FES for Restorative Therapies’ RT300 FES Cycling System

Published on July 19, 2017

The US Food and Drug Administration has granted marketing clearance to Wide Pulse Functional Electrical Stimulation (WP-FES) for the RT300 cycling system from Restorative Therapies Inc.

This clearance allows Restorative Therapies Inc to begin marketing RT300 systems incorporating the new WP-FES functionality in the United States. It also allows the RT300 cycling system to be marketed for neuromuscular re-education in addition to its existing indications, according to a media release from Restorative Therapies Inc.

According to the Baltimore-based company, WP-FES provides wider stimulation pulses (up to 3,000 microseconds) to help recruit muscles in many patients who are normally less or not responsive to standard FES.

“This development will help to make FES cycling effective in a wider range of patients and help to facilitate clinical use of the latest therapy techniques improving outcomes for patients,” says Andrew Barriskill, CEO of Restorative Therapies, in the release.

“RT300 is the only FES cycling system that offers WP-FES and neuromuscular re-education,” adds Judy Kline, marketing manager at Restorative Therapies.

[Source(s): Restorative Therapies Inc, PRWeb]

Source: FDA Approves WP-FES for Restorative Therapies’ RT300 FES Cycling System – Rehab Managment

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[WEB SITE] Integration of FES Into G-EO System Gait Trainer Receives FDA Nod

Reha Technology USA Inc announces it now offers FDA-approved integrated Functional Electronic Stimulation (FES) for its G-EO System Evolution robotic gait trainer.

“The FES in conjunction with the G-EO System will allow clinicians to generate contractions in paralyzed or weakened muscles in lower extremities at the appropriate time in the walking cycle to maximize patient outcomes,” says Matthew Brooks, clinical director of Reha Technology USA Inc, in a media release.

The G-EO System robotic gait trainer provides passive and active, assistive and resistive training and the simulation of stairs walking up and down.

“We look forward to add this integrated FES feature to all of our current and future customers and we are confident that this extended offering will create added value for their therapy environment,” adds executive VP Paul Abrams, in the release.

[Source(s): Reha Technology USA Inc, PR Newswire]

Source: Integration of FES Into G-EO System Gait Trainer Receives FDA Nod – Rehab Managment

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[Abstract] Effects of mirror therapy combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation on motor recovery of lower limbs and walking ability of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled study 

To investigate the effectiveness of mirror therapy combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation in promoting motor recovery of the lower limbs and walking ability in patients suffering from foot drop after stroke.

Randomized controlled study.

Inpatient rehabilitation center of a teaching hospital.

Sixty-nine patients with foot drop.

Patients were randomly divided into three groups: control, mirror therapy, and mirror therapy + neuromuscular electrical stimulation. All groups received interventions for 0.5 hours/day and five days/week for four weeks.

10-Meter walk test, Brunnstrom stage of motor recovery of the lower limbs, Modified Ashworth Scale score of plantar flexor spasticity, and passive ankle joint dorsiflexion range of motion were assessed before and after the four-week period.

After four weeks of intervention, Brunnstrom stage (P = 0.04), 10-meter walk test (P < 0.05), and passive range of motion (P < 0.05) showed obvious improvements between patients in the mirror therapy and control groups. Patients in the mirror therapy + neuromuscular electrical stimulation group showed better results than those in the mirror therapy group in the 10-meter walk test (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in spasticity between patients in the two intervention groups. However, compared with patients in the control group, patients in the mirror therapy + neuromuscular electrical stimulation group showed a significant decrease in spasticity (P < 0.001).

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24. Bakhtiary AH, Fatemy E. Does electrical stimulation reduce spasticity after stroke? A randomized controlled study. Clin Rehabil 2008; 22: 418425. Google Scholar Link
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28. Gondin J, Brocca L, Bellinzona E, Neuromuscular electrical stimulation training induces atypical adaptations of the human skeletal muscle phenotype: a functional and proteomic analysis. J Appl Physiol 2011; 110: 433450. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
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Source: Effects of mirror therapy combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation on motor recovery of lower limbs and walking ability of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled studyClinical Rehabilitation – Qun Xu, Feng Guo, Hassan M Abo Salem, Hong Chen, Xiaolin Huang, 2017

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[WEB SITE] NeuroRecovery Network clinical rehabilitation centers adopt Restorative Therapies’ Xcite System for Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES)

 

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation’s NeuroRecovery Network® (NRN) nine rehabilitation centers will receive 30 Restorative Therapies’ Xcite electrical stimulation systems.

Xcite multichannel electrical stimulation for neuro re-education

BALTIMORE, MD (PRWEB) JUNE 28, 2017

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation’s NeuroRecovery Network® (NRN) supports cutting-edge Clinical Rehabilitation Centers and Community Fitness and Wellness Facilities (CFWs) that make up two branches of care for people living with spinal cord injury and other physical disabilities.

The nine NRN rehabilitation centers and CFWs will receive 30 Restorative Therapies’ Xcite systems which will be used to implement NRN’s cutting edge NMES rehabilitation program for patients across the US. The acquisition was funded by the Reeve NRN Network and the University of Louisville in conjunction with the rehabilitation centers and CFWs.

NMES is a physical therapy rehabilitation modality used to evoke sensory feedback, functional movements and exercise not otherwise possible for individuals with a neurological impairment such as a spinal cord injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy.

The Xcite system delivers up to 12 channels of electrical stimulation to nerves which activate core, leg and arm muscles. Easy to use sequenced stimulation evokes functional movement enabling a patient’s paralyzed or weak muscles to move through dynamic task specific movement patterns.

“Xcite is the first truly practical electrical stimulation rehabilitation system of this kind that I have seen. In addition to combining several valuable neuro-rehabilitation interventions, task-specific electrical stimulation, mass practice and neuromuscular re-education, Xcite is portable and easy enough to use that it could be used in the patient’s home,” said Prof. Susan Harkema of the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville. “In the context of rehabilitation influencing neural plasticity as a means for neural restoration, training in the home is an essential component of progress and I see Xcite as a great tool in achieving this,” concludes Harkema.

“The NRN clinical rehabilitation centers and CFWs played a key role during the development of the Xcite system.” says Andrew Barriskill, CEO of Restorative Therapies. “Xcite is designed to be integrated into the cutting edge therapy programs being developed and utilized by the Reeve Foundation’s NRN while at the same time being easy to use within any physical therapy or occupational therapy.”

About Restorative Therapies
Restorative Therapies is the designer of medical devices providing clinic and in-home restoration therapy. Xcite is the next in the series of FES powered physical therapy systems that started with the company’s hugely successful RT300 FES cycle.

Restorative Therapies mission is to help people with a neurological impairment or in critical care achieve their full recovery potential. Restorative Therapies combines activity-based physical therapy and Functional Electrical Stimulation as a rehabilitation therapy for immobility associated with paralysis such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury or for patients in critical care.

Restorative Therapies is a privately held company headquartered in Baltimore. To learn more about Restorative Therapies please visit us at http://www.restorative-therapies.com

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[BLOG POST] Foot Drop Implants Market Analysis and Forecasts 2025

Foot drop can be defined as an abnormality in the gait where the forefoot drops due to factors such as weakness of the ankle and toe dorsiflexion. The abnormality is also caused by paralysis of the muscles in the anterior portion of the lower leg or damage to the fibular nerve. Foot drop can be associated with various conditions, including peripheral nerve injuries, neuropathies, drug toxicities, dorsiflexor injuries, and diabetes. Anatomic, muscular, and neurologic are the three categories of foot drop.

Functional electrical stimulation technology is employed in the foot drop implant to improve the gait of patients and avoid foot drop or tripping while walking. Functional electric stimulators (FES) can either be implanted within the patient’s body or employed externally. External FES is tested on the patient prior to its implantation. Implant FES involves a surgery in which the electrodes are directly placed on the nerves of the patient, which are controlled by the implant placed under the skin. The FES device activates the implant through a wireless antenna that is worn outside the body. Sensors are also associated with FES which trigger events in the walking pattern such as lifting of the heel, thereby stimulating the nerves.

The advantages of implant FES include reduction in sensation that is associated with external stimulation. In addition, it eliminates the need to adjust the electrodes on the skin on a daily basis. Rise in number of foot drop disorders due to nerve injuries, growth in knee and hip replacement therapies that lead to foot drop disorders, and increase in the number of sports related injuries contribute to the growth of the foot drop implants market. Foot drop disorders are commonly observed in diabetic retinopathy patients and this prevalence is growing due to increase in incidence of diabetes, which is propelling the growth of the market. Furthermore, the market players are focus on research and development to increase the number of foot drop implant products available in the market, driving the market growth. However, lack of reimbursement, high cost of the implants, and low awareness among the people are likely to hinder the growth of the foot drop implants market in the near future.

Get Sample Copy of this Report @ http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=B&rep_id=22913

The global foot drop implants market can be segmented on the basis of product, end-user, and region. On the basis of product, the market is categorized into functional electrical stimulators and internal fixation devices. The internal fixation devices segment is anticipated to record a significant growth during the forecast period owing to increasing demand for the devices and advantages offered by these devices such as elimination of the need to stimulate the electrodes daily. Based on end-user, the market can be segmented into hospitals, orthopedic centers, and palliative care centers, among others. The orthopedic centers segment is anticipated to record a high growth during the forecast period due to the increasing number of foot drop cases due to injuries.

Geographically, the foot drop implants market is distributed over North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Middle East & Africa. North America dominated the market in 2016 and is anticipated to continue its dominance during the forecast period. The significant growth of the market in the region can be attributed to the strong focus on research and development, increase in health care spending, and growth in awareness about the abnormality. The sluggish economy might have a negative impact on the market growth of Europe. Asia Pacific is anticipated to record a high CAGR during the forecast period, primarily driven by India and China. The rising disposable income is anticipated to contribute to the growth of the Asia Pacific market. In addition, a factor contributing to the market growth is rise in prevalence of diabetes that leads to diabetic retinopathy, which is one of the primary causes of foot drop.

View Report @ http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/foot-drop-implants-market.html

Key players operating in the foot drop implants market include Finetech Medical, Arthrex, Inc., Zimmer Biomet, Bioness Inc., Stryker Corporation, Wright Medical Group N.V., Ottobock, Narang Medical Limited, PONTiS Orthopaedics, LLC, and Shanghai MicroPort Orthopedics.

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Source: Foot Drop Implants Market Analysis and Forecasts 2025 | Medgadget

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