Archive for category Spasticity

[BLOG POST] Botox for Spasticity


What exactly is spasticity, and how does Botox help? If you have undergone damage to your brain or spinal cord, two parts of the body that control voluntary movement, you could potentially have a spasticity condition.

Spasticity is where certain muscles continuously contract, causing stiffness and tightness, which then disrupts speech, gait, and movements.

Symptoms of spasticity include involuntary muscle spasms, exaggeration of reflexes, unusual posture, muscle and joint stiffness, and more.

Some people experience spasticity more often during nighttime, and for some, it can be quite painful. The encounter will vary from person to person, but typically, you will feel stiff with jerky movements.

As someone with Spasticity, it is crucial to know your options for treatment, including Botox for spasticity.

What Does Botox Do For Spasticity?

Now that you understand what spasticity is, you should understand how Botox affects it. However, first, what is Botox?

Botox, otherwise known as “Botulinum toxin,” is a neurotoxic protein. In fact, it is the exact same toxin that causes “botulism” –  a life-threatening type of food poisoning. Before you get too concerned, though, you need to understand the way it is used that makes it relatively safe.

Doctors typically use Botox in small doses to treat various health problems, such as facial wrinkles and otherwise improving your looks. Because it is a toxin, your body cannot have too much at any one time, so it is used gradually in small amounts.

It paralyzes the underlying muscles to prevent conditions such as migraines, muscular disorders, and more. There are many who use it to treat their chronic migraines and headaches after a traumatic brain injury. Botox is inserted into your scalp in an effort to reduce headaches.

How does Botox for spasticity work, though?

It works by blocking the chemical signal between your nerves and muscles, which causes muscle contractions or tightening. As a result, your muscles can relax.

Botox has been found to be highly effective at providing relief from spasticity, most notably the pain and muscle stiffness that accompanies the condition.

Thousands of patients have seen safe results from using it to treat their spasticity, over the span of 25 years.

How Does It Work?

If you have a spasticity condition and are considering using Botox as a form of treatment, you should know the process behind it.

Botox for spasticity is administered directly to the affected area through an injection. The procedure usually involves multiple injections, and doctors will help minimize your discomfort as much as possible through the use of freezing sprays and oral versed. They also often encourage you to bring items from home that may bring comfort, including music.

The injections themselves are quite quick, usually only taking a few minutes, with follow-up care instructions provided afterward.

The length of time before relief occurs can vary based on several factors. However, generally, relief occurs in approximately a week and can last for about 3 months before symptoms may return.

After about three months have passed, you might begin noticing how the relieving effects of the Botox treatment gradually fade over several weeks, which is normal.

Botox might be among one of the first treatments recommended by your doctor before surgery is necessary. It’s important to remember that Botox may not be successful, though, depending on your circumstances.

In my case, I received Botox in my legs for my foot contractions. Prior to using these Botox treatments, my physical therapist attempted to cast my feet in a neutral position. However, they would not stay in place.

One week following the Botox injections, I was able to stand flat-footed for about one month before my feet retracted back into clonus. I was eventually referred to undergo tendon lengthening surgery to solve my issue.

While Botox for spasticity wasn’t successful in my case, I can understand how it relaxes the muscles to correct foot positioning, and it could be a potential solution for you.

Botox for spasticity is a recurring procedure that is often undertaken for a considerable amount of time to achieve the desired result, and it might be worthwhile considering for your spasticity condition.

The Benefits + Side Effects Of Botox For Spasticity

The benefits of using Botox for spasticity vary, again, depending on your circumstances and personal health issues. The most common benefits include:Improved gaitDecreased pain and stiffnessGreater ease when stretchingImproved range of motionDelays in the need for surgery

There are more benefits involved based on your personal experiences and goals.

Moreover, you should also know the potential side effects of using Botox for spasticity. This will help you know what to expect.Temporary general weaknessFalling (if Botox is given in lower body)Injection site painInjection site infection

These side effects will also vary from person to person.

Since spasticity is such a disruptive condition, in which it interferes with many motor activities, it’s not something you can simply ignore.

If it’s going to hinder your recovery, it needs to be addressed as soon as possible, and you should be consulting with your trusted doctor and/or physical therapist to discuss possible solutions – including Botox for spasticity.

Furthermore, if you have recently been a victim of traumatic brain injury, spasticity is one of the first health conditions you should be aware of and take action immediately before it progressively gets worse.

As always, consult a trusted physician and know all of your available options before proceeding with the desired treatment.

Source: BOTOX FOR SPASTICITY

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[Abstract] Movement kinematics and proprioception in post-stroke spasticity: assessment using the Kinarm robotic exoskeleton – Full Text PDF

Headline

Background

Motor impairment after stroke interferes with performance of everyday activities. Upper limb spasticity may further disrupt the movement patterns that enable optimal function; however, the specific features of these altered movement patterns, which differentiate individuals with and without spasticity, have not been fully identified. This study aimed to characterize the kinematic and proprioceptive deficits of individuals with upper limb spasticity after stroke using the Kinarm robotic exoskeleton.

Methods

Upper limb function was characterized using two tasks: Visually Guided Reaching, in which participants moved the limb from a central target to 1 of 4 or 1 of 8 outer targets when cued (measuring reaching function) and Arm Position Matching, in which participants moved the less-affected arm to mirror match the position of the affected arm (measuring proprioception), which was passively moved to 1 of 4 or 1 of 9 different positions. Comparisons were made between individuals with (n = 35) and without (n = 35) upper limb post-stroke spasticity.

Results

Statistically significant differences in affected limb performance between groups were observed in reaching-specific measures characterizing movement time and movement speed, as well as an overall metric for the Visually Guided Reaching task. While both groups demonstrated deficits in proprioception compared to normative values, no differences were observed between groups. Modified Ashworth Scale score was significantly correlated with these same measures.

Conclusions

The findings indicate that individuals with spasticity experience greater deficits in temporal features of movement while reaching, but not in proprioception in comparison to individuals with post-stroke motor impairment without spasticity. Temporal features of movement can be potential targets for rehabilitation in individuals with upper limb spasticity after stroke.

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via Movement kinematics and proprioception in post-stroke spasticity: assessment using the Kinarm robotic exoskeleton – Researcher | An App For Academics

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[Abstract] Exploratory Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Botulinum Therapy on Grasp Release After Stroke (PrOMBiS)

Background. OnabotulinumtoxinA injections improve upper-limb spasticity after stroke, but their effect on arm function remains uncertain.

Objective. To determine whether a single treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA injections combined with upper-limb physiotherapy improves grasp release compared with physiotherapy alone after stroke.

Methods. A total of 28 patients, at least 1 month poststroke, were randomized to receive either onabotulinumtoxinA or placebo injections to the affected upper limb followed by standardized upper-limb physiotherapy (10 sessions over 4 weeks). The primary outcome was time to release grasp during a functionally relevant standardized task. Secondary outcomes included measures of wrist and finger spasticity and strength using a customized servomotor, clinical assessments of stiffness (modified Ashworth Scale), arm function (Action Research Arm Test [ARAT], Nine Hole Peg Test), arm use (Arm Measure of Activity), Goal Attainment Scale, and quality of life (EQ5D).

Results. There was no significant difference between treatment groups in grasp release time 5 weeks post injection (placebo median = 3.0 s, treatment median = 2.0 s; t(24) = 1.20; P = .24; treatment effect = −0.44, 95% CI = −1.19 to 0.31). None of the secondary measures passed significance after correcting for multiple comparisons. Both groups achieved their treatment goals (placebo = 65%; treatment = 71%), and made improvements on the ARAT (placebo +3, treatment +5) and in active wrist extension (placebo +9°, treatment +11°).

Conclusions. In this group of stroke patients with mild to moderate spastic hemiparesis, a single treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA did not augment the improvements seen in grasp release time after a standardized upper-limb physiotherapy program.

 

via Exploratory Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Botulinum Therapy on Grasp Release After Stroke (PrOMBiS) 

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[Abstract] Effects of a 3D-printed orthosis compared to a low-temperature thermoplastic plate orthosis on wrist flexor spasticity in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two kinds of wrist-hand orthosis on wrist flexor spasticity in chronic stroke patients.

This is a randomized controlled trial.

The study was conducted in a rehabilitation center.

A total of 40 chronic hemiparetic stroke patients with wrist flexor spasticity were involved in the study.

Patients were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (conventional rehabilitation therapy + 3D-printed orthosis, 20 patients) or a control group (conventional rehabilitation therapy + low-temperature thermoplastic plate orthosis, 20 patients). The time of wearing orthosis was about 4–8 hours per day for six weeks.

Primary outcome measure: Modified Ashworth Scale was assessed three times (at baseline, three weeks, and six weeks). Secondary outcome measures: passive range of motion, Fugl-Meyer Assessment score, visual analogue scale score, and the swelling score were assessed twice (at baseline and six weeks). The subjective feeling score was assessed at six weeks.

No significant difference was found between the two groups in the change of Modified Ashworth Scale scores at three weeks (15% versus 25%, P = 0.496). At six weeks, the Modified Ashworth Scale scores (65% versus 30%, P = 0.02), passive range of wrist extension (P < 0.001), ulnar deviation (P = 0.028), Fugl-Meyer Assessment scores (P < 0.001), and swelling scores (P < 0.001) showed significant changes between the experimental group and the control group. No significant difference was found between the two groups in the change of visual analogue scale scores (P = 0.637) and the subjective feeling scores (P = 0.243).

3D-printed orthosis showed greater changes than low-temperature thermoplastic plate orthosis in reducing spasticity and swelling, improving motor function of the wrist and passive range of wrist extension for stroke patients.

via Effects of a 3D-printed orthosis compared to a low-temperature thermoplastic plate orthosis on wrist flexor spasticity in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial – Yanan Zheng, Gongliang Liu, Long Yu, Yanmin Wang, Yuan Fang, Yikang Shen, Xiuling Huang, Lei Qiao, Jianzhong Yang, Ying Zhang, Zikai Hua,

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[Abstract] Design of Powered Wearable Elbow Brace for Rehabilitation Applications at Clinic and Home – IEEE Conference Publication

Abstract

Spasticity and contractures are secondary to most neurological and orthopaedic pathologies. The most conservative method of management of spasticity and contractures is passive stretching exercises. Robotic rehabilitation aims to provide a solution to this problem. We describe in details the design of a powered wearable orthosis especially designed for managing spasticity and contractures. The device is fully portable, allowing the patient to undergo repeated-passive-dynamic exercises outside the hospital environment. The design of the device is modular to make it adaptable to different anatomies and pathologies. The device is also fitted with electrogoniometers and torque sensors to record kinematics and dynamics of the patient, improving the insight of the clinicians to the rehabilitation of the patient, as well as providing data for further clinical and scientific investigations. The mechanical integrity of the device elements is simulated and verified.

via Design of Powered Wearable Elbow Brace for Rehabilitation Applications at Clinic and Home – IEEE Conference Publication

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[NEWS] Botox is Now Approved for Lower-Limb Spasticity in Children

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The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan) to ease lower-limb spasticity in children and adolescents aged 2 years to 17 years, excluding spasticity caused by cerebral palsy (CP), Allergan announces.

“Lower limb spasticity can impact many aspects of a child’s life and have a drastic influence on their overall development and quality of life,” David Nicholson, Allergan’s chief research and development officer, says in a news release.

The FDA approved Botox for lower-limb spasticity on the basis of safety and efficacy data from a phase 3 study involving more than 300 children aged 2 years or older with lower-limb spasticity.

Participants in the trial had CP, but the approved indication excludes lower-limb spasticity caused by CP, owing to marketing exclusivity by another company, according to Allergan.

The approved recommended dose per treatment session is 4 to 8 units/kg divided among affected muscles of the lower limb. The total dose for pediatric patients should not exceed 8 units/kg body weight, or 300 units, whichever is lower.

When treating both lower limbs or upper and lower limbs in combination, the total dose for pediatric patients should not exceed 10 units/kg, or 340 units, whichever is lower, in a 3-month interval, the company states.

“Pediatric lower limb spasticity inhibits normal muscular movement and function and can result in delayed or impaired motor development, as well as difficulty with posture and positioning,” Mark Gormley, Jr, MD, of Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare–St. Paul, comments, in the release.

“Botox has a well-established safety and efficacy profile, and supports children and adolescents successfully manage both their upper and lower limb spasticity,” said Gormley.

Botox was approved for pediatric upper-limb spasticity in June.

[Source: Medscape]

 

via Botox is Now Approved for Lower-Limb Spasticity in Children – Rehab Managment

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[BLOG POST] Home After a Stroke: What I Learned About Splints as a Stroke Survivor

What I Learned About Splints as a Stroke Survivor

When spasticity from a stroke holds muscles in one position, muscle fibers become short which restricts motion.  Lannin (1) concluded “splinting has little or no effect on the loss of range of motion” (p. 113).  Unfortunately, Lannin told therapists to stop all passive stretching and restrict active hand exercises to 10 minutes a day.  So the data does not tell us if a resting night splint is a useful addition to standard therapy.

I wondered what would happen if I continued to do passive stretching and active hand exercises, but stopped wearing my resting splint at night.  After a month of not wearing this splint I could feel my thumb getting tighter.  I resumed wearing my splint and the next morning I woke up with a wicked ache in my thumb.  My thumb is tight by bedtime so my splint has not eliminated spasticity.  Placing the hand in one static position does not retrain the brain to produce active range of motion (AROM).  Yet I believe my splint has prevented a painful permanent contracture.

I love my new SaeboStretch resting splint I wear at night.  The new soft straps do not cut into my skin the way the old plastic straps did.  This version also uses a new kind of “Velcro” that does not have spiky hooks that scratch my bare thigh.  Notice that there are now two finger straps and two thumb straps.  The cover zips off so it can be washed.

1.  Lannin N, Cusick A, McCluskey A, Herbert R. Effects of splinting on wrist contracture after stroke. Stroke. 2009;38:111-116.

 

via Home After a Stroke: What I Learned About Splints as a Stroke Survivor

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[WEB PAGE] Dysport is Now Approved for Upper Limb Spasticity as Well

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The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the use of Dysport (abobotulinumtoxinA) for injection to include the treatment of upper limb spasticity in children two years of age and older, excluding spasticity caused by cerebral palsy (CP), Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals, an affiliate of Ipsen, announces in a news release.

This approval makes Dysport the first botulinum toxin approved by the FDA for both pediatric spasticity indications, following the previous approval to treat children with lower limb spasticity aged two and older received in July 2016.

“For physicians, it is reassuring to have a botulinum toxin treatment in Dysport which demonstrated sustained symptom relief for spasticity, which can be physically challenging for children,” says Ann Tilton, MD, study investigator and Professor of Clinical Neurology at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans, in the release.

“This FDA decision for Dysport means we now have an approved therapy to offer children and adolescents seeking improvements in mobility in both upper and lower limbs.”

The approval is based on a Phase 3 study with children aged two to 17 years old being treated for upper limb spasticity. Due to Orphan Drug Exclusivity, this approval excludes use in children with upper limb spasticity caused by CP. Dysport demonstrated statistically significant improvements from baseline at Week 6 with doses of 8 Units/kg and 16 Units/kg vs. 2 Units/kg, as measured by the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) in the elbow or wrist flexors.

Dysport demonstrated a reduction in spasticity symptoms through 12 weeks for most children for both upper and lower limbs. In the upper limb study, a majority of patients were retreated between 16-28 weeks; however, some patients had a longer duration of response (ie, 34 weeks or more). The most frequent adverse reactions observed were upper respiratory tract infection and pharyngitis, the release explains.

“This approval is a testament to Ipsen’s legacy in neurotoxin research and continued commitment to advancing patient care,” states Kimberly Baldwin, Vice President, Franchise Head, Neuroscience Business Unit, Ipsen. “We believe the data for both pediatric upper and lower limb spasticity underscore the role of Dysport as an important treatment option for patients seeking long-lasting spasticity symptom relief.”

For more information, visit Ipsen.

[Source(s): Ipsen, Business Wire]

 

via Dysport is Now Approved for Upper Limb Spasticity as Well – Rehab Managment

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[Abstract] Effects of kinesio taping on hemiplegic hand in patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity: a randomized controlled pilot study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Post-stroke spasticity is a common complication in patients with stroke and a key contributor to impaired hand function after stroke.
AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of kinesio taping on managing spasticity of upper extremity and motor performance in patients with subacute stroke.
DESIGN: A randomized controlled pilot study.
SETTING: A hospital center.
POPULATION: Participants with stroke within six months.
METHODS: Thirty-one participants were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated into kinesio taping (KT) group or control group. In KT group, Kinesio Tape was applied as an add-on treatment over the dorsal side of the affected hand during the intervention. Both groups received regular rehabilitation 5 days a week for 3 weeks. The primary outcome was muscle spasticity measured by modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Secondary outcomes were functional performances of affected limb measured by using Fugl-Meyer assessment for upper extremity (FMA-UE), Brunnstrom stage, and the Simple Test for Evaluating Hand Function (STEF). Measures were taken before intervention, right after intervention (the third week) and two weeks later (the fifth week).
RESULTS: Within-group comparisons yielded significant differences in FMA-UE and Brunnstrom stages at the third and fifth week in the control group (P=0.003-0.019). In the KT group, significant differences were noted in FMA-UE, Brunnstrom stage, and MAS at the third and fifth week (P=0.001-0.035), and in the proximal part of FMA-UE between the third and fifth week (P=0.005). Between-group comparisons showed a significant difference in the distal part of FMA-UE at the fifth week (P=0.037).
CONCLUSIONS: Kinesio taping could provide some benefits in reducing spasticity and in improving motor performance on the affected hand in patients with subacute stroke.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Kinesio taping could be a choice for clinical practitioners to use for effectively managing post-stroke spasticity.

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via Effects of kinesio taping on hemiplegic hand in patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity: a randomized controlled pilot study – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2019 October;55(5):551-7 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[BLOG POST] PathMaker Neurosystems – Publication of First Clinical Trial Results for MyoRegulator® Device for Non-Invasive Treatment of Spasticity

PathMaker Neurosystems Inc. (“PathMaker”), a clinical-stage bioelectronic medicine company developing breakthrough non-invasive systems for the treatment of patients with spasticity and paralysis has announced the first publication of clinical trial results for its MyoRegulator® device for the non-invasive treatment of spasticity. Published in Bioelectronic Medicine, the results provide the first clinical evidence using MyoRegulator to treat upper extremity spasticity in subjects with chronic stroke. MyoRegulator is an investigational medical device and is limited by US Federal law to investigational use only.

Spasticity is a chronic condition characterised by painful muscle contractions and is common in patients suffering from stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury and other neurological disorders. Management of spasticity is a difficult challenge and is currently managed primarily by pharmacological agents and injected botulinum neurotoxins, and there is tremendous unmet medical need.  MyoRegulator is a first-in-class non-invasive device based on PathMaker’s proprietary DoubleStim™ technology (combining anodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) and peripheral nerve direct current stimulation (pDCS)), which provides simultaneous non-invasive stimulation intended to suppress hyperexcitable spinal neurons involved with spasticity.

“Current pharmacological approaches to managing spasticity have, at best, short-term efficacy, are confounded by adverse effects, and are often unpleasant for the patient,” said co-author Zaghloul Ahmed, Ph.D., Professor and Chairman, Department of Physical Therapy and Professor, Center for Developmental Neuroscience, CUNY and Scientific Founder of PathMaker Neurosystems. “The initial study results demonstrate the potential of a novel, non-invasive treatment to reduce spasticity and improve functional recovery in patients with upper motor neuron syndrome after stroke.”

The publication, Non-Invasive Treatment of Patients with Upper Extremity Spasticity Following Stroke Using Paired Trans-spinal and Peripheral Direct Current Stimulation, was authored by researchers at Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health (Manhasset, NY) led by Bruce Volpe, M.D. The study included patients with upper limb hemiparesis and wrist spasticity at least 6 months after their initial stroke in a single-blind, sham-controlled, crossover design study to test whether MyoRegulator treatment reduces chronic upper-extremity spasticity.

Twenty subjects received five consecutive 20-minute daily treatments with sham stimulation followed by a 1-week washout period, then five consecutive 20-minute daily treatments with active stimulation. Subjects were told that the order of active or sham stimulation would be randomized. Clinical and objective measures of spasticity and motor function were collected before the first session of each condition (baseline), immediately following the last session of each condition, and weekly for 5 weeks after the completion of active treatments. The results demonstrated significant group mean reductions from baseline in both Modified Tardieu Scale scores (summed across the upper limb, P<0.05), and in objectively measured muscle resistance at the wrist flexor (P<0.05) following active treatment as compared to following sham treatment. Motor function also improved significantly (measured by the Fugl-Meyer and Wolf Motor Function Test; P<0.05 for both tests) after active treatment, even without additional prescribed activity or training. The effect of the active MyoRegulator treatment was durable for the 5-week follow-up period.

We are highly encouraged by these clinical results which demonstrate the potential of MyoRegulator to improve outcomes for patients suffering from spasticity, without the need for surgery or drugs. Building on these results and our ongoing clinical trial in Europe, we expect to initiate a US multi-center, pivotal, double-blind clinical trial supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in early 2020.

Nader Yaghoubi, M.D., Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of PathMaker

 

About PathMaker Neurosystems Inc.

PathMaker Neurosystems is a clinical stage bioelectronic medicine company developing breakthrough non-invasive systems for the treatment of patients with chronic neuromotor conditions. With offices in Boston (US) and Paris (France), we are collaborating with world-class institutions to rapidly bring to market disruptive products for treating spasticity, paralysis and muscle weakness. In January 2019, we announced a collaboration and distribution agreement with WeHealth Digital Medicine to commercialise the MyoRegulator® device worldwide, excluding US and Japan territories retained by PathMaker.  More than 48 million patients in the US, Europe and China suffer disabilities due to stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson’s disease and other neurological disorders. At PathMaker, we are opening up a new era of non-invasive neurotherapy for patients suffering from chronic neuromotor conditions. For more information, please visit the company website at www.pmneuro.com.

Source: PathMaker Neurosystems Inc.

via PathMaker Neurosystems – Publication of First Clinical Trial Results for MyoRegulator® Device for Non-Invasive Treatment of Spasticity | ACNR | Online Neurology Journal

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