Archive for category TBI

[VIDEO] A Song About Traumatic Brain Injury – YouTube

Listen at: http://laetolimusic.com/release/post-… 5.3 million Americans are living with a TBI-related (Traumatic Brain Injury). This is one woman’s experience… Download the song now.

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[WEB SITE] Traumatic Brain Injury Resource Guide – Brain Injury News Feb 1, 2018 to April 5, 2019

Brain Injury News

Date Title
04/05/2019 Mental health issues often progress after brain injury
04/04/2019 Head injuries in soccer
04/03/2019 Researchers discover gene suppressing stroke and brain injury recovery
04/02/2019 8 Warning Signs That a Stroke Is Coming On – Look for Little Things
04/01/2019 Near-infrared energy used as therapy during recovery of traumatic brain injury
03/29/2019 Behavioral markers of recovery of consciousness after severe brain injury
03/28/2019 These concussion-preventing bike helmets mimic the brain’s protective fluid
03/27/2019 Scientists discover unique tau filament structures in head-injury associated dementia
03/26/2019 New study reshapes understanding of how the brain recovers from injury
03/25/2019 Fewer boys are suffering head injuries, but rate rises for girls
03/22/2019 Risk of attempted suicide among adolescents and young adults with traumatic brain injury
03/21/2019 Mild traumatic brain injury and psychopathology in adolescence
03/20/2019 New traumatic brain injury blood test approved by FDA
03/19/2019 Football, soccer lead to the most brain injuries in kids
03/18/2019 New approach to stroke treatment could minimize brain damage
03/15/2019 Researchers outline the role of a deep brain structure in concussion
03/14/2019 Scientists teach machines to predict recovery time from sports-related concussions
03/13/2019 The contribution of social support, professional support, and financial hardship to family caregiver life satisfaction after traumatic brain injury
03/12/2019 Decreased risk of dementia among patients with traumatic brain injury receiving acupuncture treatment
03/11/2019 Cognitive reserve protects against memory decrements associated with neuropathology
03/08/2019 Brain injury rampant among domestic violence survivors
03/07/2019 Estimated life-time savings in the cost of ongoing care following specialist rehabilitation for severe traumatic brain injury
03/06/2019 Should we assess pituitary function in children after a mild traumatic brain injury?
03/05/2019 Global outcome trajectories up to 10 years after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury
03/04/2019 Sex differences in traumatic brain injury
03/01/2019 Factors contributing to parent-child interaction quality following mild traumatic brain injury in early childhood
02/28/2019 March is brain injury awareness month
02/27/2019 Brain injuries in women prisoners are linked to mental illness and reoffending
02/26/2019 Nixing neuron receptor improves recovery from brain injury
02/25/2019 Blood test being developed to better diagnose traumatic brain injuries
02/22/2019 Alcohol has a dose-dependent effect on the outcomes of traumatic brain injury patients
02/21/2019 ‘I hit my head.’ Let’s talk about traumatic brain injury
02/20/2019 Amantadine may be effective treatment for headaches after traumatic brain injury
02/19/2019 Traumatic brain injuries linked to epilepsy development
02/18/2019 Amantadine may be effective treatment for headaches after traumatic brain injury
02/15/2019 New study shows chronic head injuries lead to mental health issues
02/14/2019 Pill that reverses brain damage could be on the horizon
02/13/2019 Association of concussion with the risk of suicide
02/12/2019 Drug combo makes neurons to replace damaged ones
02/11/2019 Nearly 65% of prisoners at women’s jail ‘show signs of brain injury’
02/08/2019 Concussed adolescent athletes ‘prescribed’ aerobic exercise recovered faster
02/07/2019 New monitoring software suggests sub-concussive blows cause brain function changes
02/06/2019 Cancer drug shows promise in mitigating concussive brain injuries
02/05/2019 Mild traumatic brain injury linked to higher risk of PTSD, depression
02/04/2019 Wrestling with uncertainty after mild traumatic brain injury
02/01/2019 The frequency and the diagnosis of pituitary dysfunction after traumatic brain injury
01/31/2019 Self-awareness following a traumatic brain injury in childhood
01/30/2019 Concussion and its consequences
01/29/2019 Pharmacotherapy effectiveness in treating depression after traumatic brain injury
01/28/2019 Pituitary dysfunction due to sports-related traumatic brain injury
01/25/2019 How concussions may lead to epilepsy
01/24/2019 Quality of life in adolescents recovering from sports-related concussion
01/23/2019 Smartphone app that can rapidly monitor the brain for signs of concussion
01/22/2019 Brain vital signs capture undetected impairments in ice hockey players with concussions
01/21/2019 Life after my traumatic brain injury will never be the same again, but I’m taking it one step at a time
01/18/2019 Traumatic brain injury and psychiatric co-morbidity
01/17/2019 Employment probability trajectories up to 10 years after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury
01/16/2019 Sleep-wake disturbances in childhood traumatic brain injury
01/15/2019 Predictors of community integration following traumatic brain injury
01/14/2019 Moderate to severe gambling problems and traumatic brain injury
01/11/2019 Behavioral therapies may treat headache and post-concussive symptoms
01/10/2019 Childhood socioeconomic status predicts cognitive outcomes across adulthood following traumatic brain injury
01/09/2019 Prevalence of medical and psychiatric comorbidities following traumatic brain injury
01/08/2019 Forget baseline tests, eye-tracking brings greater clarity to concussion diagnosis
01/07/2019 Effect of low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on depression and cognition of patients with traumatic brain injury
01/04/2019 I suffered from 2 traumatic brain injuries, but it took 13 years to get a diagnosis
01/03/2019 Traumatic brain injury bill set to become federal law
01/02/2019 Are traumatic brain injuries associated with criminality after taking account of childhood family Social Status and Disruptive Behaviors?
12/31/2018 Tackle football poses a grave risk to young athletes
12/28/2018 Intimate partner violence and traumatic brain injury: An “invisible” public health epidemic
12/27/2018 Effects of cerebrolysin on functional outcome of patients with traumatic brain injury
12/26/2018 Understanding repetitive head impacts in sports
12/21/2018 Researchers find lasting impact of concussions on young adults
12/20/2018 Computers determine states of consciousness
12/19/2018 Study makes significant findings related to traumatic brain injury
12/18/2018 There may be a surprising link between depression and concussions in kids who play football
12/17/2018 A new strategy for brain regeneration after stroke
12/14/2018 Dialysis patients at risk of progressive brain injury
12/13/2018 Experts address sleep disorders following traumatic brain injury
12/12/2018 ‘Before, I was quite a shy person’: life after brain damage
12/11/2018 Rethinking treatment of traumatic brain injuries among children with disabilities
12/10/2018 Rural youth with mild head injuries face higher medical costs but get less care
12/07/2018 Kids with concussions can phase in exercise, screen time sooner than before
12/06/2018 Youth football changes nerve fibers in brain
12/05/2018 Commonly used concussion test useful in confirming—but not making—diagnosis for pro athletes
12/04/2018 Brain changes seen in MRIs of young football players
12/03/2018 How I got my life back on track after a brain injury
11/30/2018 EEG response to speech identifies severe brain injury patients with preserved cognition
11/29/2018 The search for a pill that treats concussions
11/28/2018 New way to ID cognitively aware yet unresponsive people with severe brain injury
11/27/2018 Head injuries lead to serious brain diseases- Here’s all you need to know
11/26/2018 Reprogrammed cells could tackle brain damage
11/21/2018 Suicide after concussion rare, but risk is higher
11/20/2018 New concussion recommendations for kids
11/19/2018 Researchers find further link between a-fib, brain injury, and possible neurodegeneration
11/16/2018 Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage
11/15/2018 Blood test may one day help track concussion recovery
11/14/2018 One type of brain cell might hold key to inflammation after head injury
11/13/2018 Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers mark 30 years of research
11/12/2018 New research shows symptom improvement after concussion in children varies
11/09/2018 Good sleep quality encourages better recovery after sport-related concussion
11/08/2018 Traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-term neurological and psychiatric disorders
11/07/2018 Evidence of brain injuries present in football players at young ages
11/06/2018 Socioeconomic status affects outcomes after traumatic brain injury
11/05/2018 Transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of depression in a patient with traumatic brain injury
11/02/2018 Changes in growth factor levels over a 7-day period predict the functional outcomes of traumatic brain injury
11/01/2018 pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury
10/31/2018 Gender differences in employment and economic quality of life following traumatic brain injury
10/30/2018 Concussion and college football: how many hits to the head is too much?
10/29/2018 Cerebral atrophy following traumatic brain injury
10/26/2018 Globally recognised treatment to cool the brain after a head injury does not reduce the risk of permanent damage
10/25/2018 Feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms underlie the relationship between traumatic brain injury and gut microbiota
10/24/2018 With dangers of everyday concussions revealed, scientists race to find solutions
10/23/2018 Sleep disruption following mild traumatic brain injury
10/22/2018 Quality of life and symptom burden 1 month after concussion in children and adolescents
10/19/2018 A systematic review and meta-analysis of return to work after mild Traumatic brain injury
10/18/2018 Kids’ concussion symptoms may persist for a year
10/17/2018 Sugar, a “sweet” tool to understand brain injuries
10/16/2018 Neck device shows promise in protecting the brain of female soccer players
10/15/2018 Patterns of pituitary dysfunction three months or more after traumatic brain injury
10/12/2018 Are eyes a window to diagnosing acute concussion in youth?
10/11/2018 Scientists design new methodology of motor assessment for patients with acquired brain injury
10/10/2018 Every cell has a story to tell in brain injury
10/09/2018 Concussion history and cognitive function
10/08/2018 Traumatic brain injury as an independent risk factor for problem gambling
10/05/2018 Prevalence of TBI 2.5 percent among U.S. children
10/04/2018 What happens to the brain after a traumatic injury?
10/03/2018 Researchers discover possible cause for Alzheimer’s and traumatic brain injury
10/02/2018 Neurobehavioral symptoms predictive of employment outcome after traumatic brain injury
10/01/2018 White matter repair and traumatic brain injury
09/28/2018 1 in 6 Americans over 40 has been knocked unconscious
09/27/2018 Traumatic brain injury as an independent risk factor for problem gambling
09/26/2018 New attention being paid to emotional toll of traumatic brain injuries
09/25/2018 Brain recovery: Activity, not rest, may speed recovery after brain injury
09/24/2018 Researchers find children experience concussion symptoms three times longer than adults
09/21/2018 Life after concussion
09/20/2018 For kids with concussions, less time alone in a dark room
09/19/2018 An improvement in outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury
09/18/2018 Clinical characteristics of patients with bipolar disorder and premorbid traumatic brain injury
09/17/2018 What happens inside an injured brain?
09/14/2018 Outcomes of subjective sleep-wake disturbances 20 years after traumatic brain injury in childhood
09/13/2018 Indicators of long-term return to work after severe traumatic brain injury
09/12/2018 The CDC just released new concussion guidelines for kids
09/11/2018 New guidelines for traumatic brain injury — Built with input from rehabilitation professionals
09/10/2018 Benefits of methylphenidate for long-term attention problems after traumatic brain injury in childhood
09/07/2018 Concussions loosen insulation around brain cells
09/06/2018 The effect of antidepressants on depression after traumatic brain injury
09/05/2018 Helmets may not protect skiers from traumatic brain injury
09/04/2018 Device aims to detect concussion symptoms in the blink of an eye
08/31/2018 Different, but still whole: A young scientist reflects on his journey back from a brain injury
08/30/2018 Traumatic brain injury recovery via electrically stimulating neuron cells
08/29/2018 Head and neck positioning affects concussion risk
08/28/2018 Protecting against brain injuries
08/27/2018 Diagnosed: Under-reported brain injuries and their lasting effects
08/24/2018 Traumatic brain injury and incarceration: Ending a vicious cycle
08/23/2018 Association between traumatic brain injury and risk of suicide
08/22/2018 Genetic risk for ADHD not linked to ADHD symptoms after TBI
08/21/2018 How concussion stresses the heart, to protect the brain
08/20/2018 Immune Tolerance Therapy: A new method for treatment of traumatic brain injury
08/17/2018 Marriage breakdown after brain injury
08/16/2018 Suicide risk higher in people with brain injury
08/15/2018 ognitive training can reduce depressive symptoms in individuals with traumatic brain injury
08/14/2018 Researchers link residential characteristics with productivity one year after brain injury
08/13/2018 Serum magnesium as a marker of neurological outcome in traumatic brain injury patients
08/10/2018 Employment stability in the first 5 years after traumatic brain injury
08/09/2018 Concussion symptoms: take them seriously
08/08/2018 How severe brain injury might trigger dementia
08/07/2018 Head injury risk higher for female soccer players
08/06/2018 Scientists develop blood-drop test for concussion
08/03/2018 Finding lost emotions after brain injury
08/02/2018 Poor sleep is linked to impeded recovery from traumatic brain injury
08/01/2018 Sleep disturbance in children with traumatic brain injury compared with children with orthopedic injury
07/31/2018 The relationship between mental health and quality of life in children with traumatic brain injury three months after the injury
07/30/2018 Traumatic brain injury: Discovery of two molecules could lead to new drug treatments
07/27/2018 Study supports blood test to help diagnose brain injury
07/26/2018 ADHD tied to increased concussion risk for kids
07/25/2018 Developmental outcomes after traumatic brain injury in young children: Are infants more vulnerable than toddlers?
07/24/2018 Acupuncture for treatment of persistent disturbed sleep: A randomized clinical trial in veterans with mild traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder
07/23/2018 8-year outcome after severe traumatic brain injury
07/20/2018 Scientists hunt for a test to diagnose chronic brain injury in living people
07/19/2018 TBI biomarker shows promise to support rapid damage evaluation & predict outcomes
07/18/2018 Exosomes in blood indicate mild TBI
07/17/2018 Concussion may bring greater risks for athletes with ADHD
07/16/2018 Emotional reserve and prolonged post-concussive symptoms and disability
07/13/2018 Concussion pill shows promise in pre-clinical pilot study
07/12/2018 Do mild concussions increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease?
07/11/2018 Obesity and overweight linked to long-term health problems after traumatic brain injury
07/10/2018 People with traumatic brain injury are at increased risk of dementia
07/09/2018 Sex-based differences in affective and cognitive empathy following severe traumatic brain injury
07/06/2018 Time-based prospective memory in children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury
07/05/2018 Psychological resilience is associated with participation outcomes following traumatic brain injury
07/03/2018 Starting physical therapy earlier may benefit adolescents with concussion
07/02/2018 Scientists identify immune cells that remove degenerating neurons after brain injury
06/29/2018 The influence of yoga on individuals with traumatic brain injury related to sleep and mood
06/28/2018 Clinical validation of S100B in the management of a mild traumatic brain injury
06/27/2018 Barriers and enablers to aligning rehabilitation goals to patient life roles following acquired brain injury
06/26/2018 Deficits in saccades and smooth-pursuit eye movements in adults with traumatic brain injury
06/25/2018 ‘Antifreeze’ molecules may stop and reverse damage from brain injuries
06/22/2018 Simple cognitive task after brain injury improves memory function
06/21/2018 Melatonin as a treatment after traumatic brain injury
06/20/2018 Disability and quality of life 20 years after traumatic brain injury
06/19/2018 One-year outcome following brain injury: a comparison of younger versus elderly major trauma patients
06/19/2018 Concussion symptoms vary depending on your sex, & here’s why it matters
06/18/2018 Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in moderate to severe head injured patients: Pure DAI vs. non-pure DAI
06/18/2018 Targeting inflammation may protect and restore the brain after stroke
06/15/2018 The incidence of anosmia after traumatic brain injury
06/14/2018 Characterization of balance control after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury
06/13/2018 Sedentary behavior predicts headache pain following mild traumatic brain injury
06/12/2018 The relationship between agitation and impairments of orientation and memory during the PTA period after traumatic brain injury
06/11/2018 Relationship between hispanic nativity, residential environment, and productive activity among individuals with traumatic brain injury
06/08/2018 Traumatic brain injury and the risk for subsequent crime perpetration
06/07/2018 Predictors of neuropsychological outcome after pediatric concussion
06/07/2018 Scientists work to dissolve the NETs that worsen TBI damage
06/06/2018 Risk of depression following traumatic brain injury in a large national sample
06/05/2018 Traumatic brain injury history and progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease
06/04/2018 Efficacy of the resilience and adjustment intervention after traumatic brain injury
06/01/2018 Obsessive-compulsive disorder due to traumatic brain injury
05/31/2018 Melatonin as a therapy for traumatic brain injury
05/31/2018 After a concussion, waiting for the sense of smell to return
05/30/2018 Positive psychology perspective on traumatic brain injury recovery and rehabilitation
05/30/2018 Traumatic brain injury without loss of consciousness associated with increased dementia risk
05/29/2018 Role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy for prognosis of patients with traumatic brain injury
05/24/2018 Assessing the longer-term effects of mild traumatic brain injury on self-reported driving ability
05/24/2018 Strategic training may cut symptoms of depression post-brain injury
05/23/2018 Onset, time course and prediction of spasticity after stroke or traumatic brain injury
05/23/2018 Unmet therapy needs common in children with traumatic brain injury
05/22/2018 The effectiveness of physical exercise as an intervention to reduce depressive symptoms following traumatic brain injury
05/22/2018 How can we help children with brain injuries transition back to school?
05/21/2018 The experience of return to work in individuals with traumatic brain injury
05/18/2018 Amantadine did not positively impact cognition in chronic traumatic brain injury
05/17/2018 Frequency and prognostic factors of olfactory dysfunction after traumatic brain injury
05/17/2018 Even mild concussion tied to greater dementia risk later
05/16/2018 Methylphenidate-mediated motor control enhancement in patients with traumatic brain injury
05/16/2018 A life shattered by brain injury
05/15/2018 Outcomes in nursing home patients with traumatic brain injury
05/15/2018 Changes to tiny blood vessels may help diagnose traumatic brain injuries
05/14/2018 Brain plasticity and modern neurorehabilitation technologies
05/14/2018 Acute and chronic changes in myelin following mild traumatic brain injury
05/11/2018 Extra practice outside therapy sessions to maximize training opportunity during inpatient rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury
05/11/2018 Playing football young may mean earlier cognitive, emotional problems
05/10/2018 A case report of guardian-consent forced paliperidone palmitate for behavioral disturbance due to traumatic brain injury
05/10/2018 How injuries change our brain and how we can help it recover
05/09/2018 Psychological well-being in individuals living in the community with traumatic brain injury
05/09/2018 One concussion could increase risk of Parkinson’s disease
05/08/2018 Fatigue and associated factors in traumatic brain injury and its correlation with insomnia and depression
05/08/2018 Soccer heading — not collisions — cognitively impairs players
05/07/2018 Prediction of persistent post-concussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury
05/07/2018 The scientific reason a brain injury can change your personality
05/04/2018 The experience of a recreational camp for families with a child or young person with acquired brain injury
05/04/2018 Blood biomarkers may allow easier detection, confirmation of concussions
05/03/2018 Traumatic brain injury-related symptoms reported by parents: clinical, imaging, and host predictors in children with impairments in consciousness <24 hours
05/03/2018 Many U.S. kids with brain injuries not getting needed rehab
05/02/2018 Plasma metabolomic biomarkers accurately classify acute mild traumatic brain injury from controls
05/02/2018 Blood test reveals progress of concussion recovery in athletes
05/01/2018 Is electroconvulsive therapy a treatment for depression following traumatic brain injury?
05/01/2018 Starting aerobic exercise soon after concussion improves recovery time
04/30/2018 Behavioral interventions for inappropriate sexual behavior in individuals with acquired brain injury
04/30/2018 Does concussion recovery and symptom severity differ between men and women?
04/27/2018 Fear avoidance and clinical outcomes from mild traumatic brain injury
04/27/2018 Research suggests that kids with brain injuries have a higher risk of ADHD
04/26/2018 Unmet rehabilitation needs after hospitalization for traumatic brain injury
04/26/2018 Traumatic brain injury—the unseen impact of domestic violence
04/25/2018 Effects of electrical stimulation in people with post-concussion syndromes
04/25/2018 Researchers chart a new way to look at concussion
04/24/2018 Acute prediction of outcome and cognitive-communication impairments following traumatic brain injury: the influence of age, education and site of lesion
04/24/2018 Scientists watch in real time as the lining of the brain heals itself after traumatic injury
04/23/2018 Behavioral and neurophysiological abnormalities during cued continuous performance tasks in patients with mild traumatic brain injury
04/23/2018 Reversing brain injury in newborns and adults
04/19/2018 Understanding divergent trajectories in pediatric patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury
04/19/2018 Receptor that feels the heat of a red chili pepper may be target for TBI recovery
04/18/2018 Behavioral and brain imaging changes in patients receiving bright light therapy following a mild traumatic brain injury
04/18/2018 Brain injuries increase dementia risk, study finds
04/17/2018 Distinct 6-Month functional outcome trajectories and predictors after traumatic brain injury
04/17/2018 Scientists have discovered a new stem cell that could heal brain damage
04/16/2018 Neuroendocrine abnormalities following traumatic brain injury: An important contributor to neuropsychiatric sequelae
04/16/2018 Concussion increases the risk of prolonged headache woes
04/13/2018 MLC901 (NeuroAiD II™ ) for cognition after traumatic brain injury
04/13/2018 Multiple, smaller head blows can be worse than concussions
04/12/2018 The impact of cultural background on outcome following traumatic brain injury
04/12/2018 Waking up “sleeping” stem cells in the brain could improve its ability to repair injury
04/11/2018 Perceived stigma and its association with participation following traumatic brain injury
04/11/2018 Could this drug help the brain recover after a stroke?
04/10/2018 Trajectories in health recovery in the 12 months following a mild traumatic brain injury in children
04/09/2018 Interpersonal stressors and resources as predictors of adolescent adjustment following traumatic brain injury
04/06/2018 Effects of web-based parent training on caregiver functioning following pediatric traumatic brain injury
04/05/2018 The association of rehospitalization with participation 5 years after traumatic brain injury
04/05/2018 Gene therapy may help brain heal from stroke
04/04/2018 Exercise rehabilitation attenuates cognitive deficits with traumatic brain injury
04/04/2018 Prosthetic memories help brain injury patients with short-term recall
04/03/2018 Altruistic decisions following penetrating traumatic brain injury
04/02/2018 Imagining the future in children with severe traumatic brain injury
03/30/2018 Depression in the first year after traumatic brain injury
03/29/2018 Fatigue following pediatric acquired brain injury and its impact on functional outcomes
03/28/2018 Secondary Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents 5 to 10 years after traumatic brain injury
03/27/2018 Predictors of post-discharge seizures in children with traumatic brain injury
03/27/2018 Kids with severe brain injuries may develop ADHD
03/26/2018 Longitudinal recovery of executive control functions after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury
03/23/2018 Use of an errorless learning approach in a person with concomitant traumatic spinal cord injury and brain injury
03/22/2018 Long-term effects of mild traumatic brain injuries to oculomotor tracking performances and reaction times to simple environmental stimuli
03/21/2018 Relax while you rehabilitate: A pilot study integrating a novel, yoga-based mindfulness group intervention into a residential military brain injury rehabilitation program
03/20/2018 Association of post-traumatic stress symptom severity with health-related quality of life and self-reported functioning across 12-months after severe traumatic brain injury
03/19/2018 Persistent symptoms and activity changes three months after mild traumatic brain injury
03/16/2018 Interventions to enhance coping after traumatic brain injury
03/15/2018 Is there a correlation between family functioning and functional recovery in patients with acquired brain injury?
03/14/2018 Efficacy of a micro-prompting technology in reducing support needed by people with severe acquired brain injury in activities of daily living
03/13/2018 Assessment of recovery following pediatric traumatic brain injury
03/12/2018 Magnesium administration after experimental traumatic brain injury improves decision-making skills
03/09/2018 Hearing loss after traumatic brain injury
03/08/2018 Persistent symptoms and activity changes three months after mild traumatic brain injury
03/07/2018 Aerobic exercise for adolescents with prolonged symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury
03/07/2018 Girls’ concussion symptoms last twice as long as those in boys
03/06/2018 Visual problems associated with traumatic brain injury
03/05/2018 Lifelong behavioral and neuropathological consequences of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury
03/02/2018 Cognitive function and participation in children and youth with mild traumatic brain injury two years after injury
03/01/2018 Trajectory of functional independent measurements during first 5-years following traumatic brain injury
02/28/2018 Safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of dextromethorphan for pseudobulbar affect following traumatic brain injury
02/27/2018 Blood biomarkers in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury
02/26/2018 Cerebral blood vessel damage in traumatic brain injury
02/23/2018 Long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury in bone metabolism
02/23/2018 All children do not follow the same path to concussion recovery
02/22/2018 Traumatic brain injury, sleep disorders, and psychiatric disorders: An underrecognized relationship
02/22/2018 Positive psychology helps brain injury survivors recover with a better outlook on life
02/21/2018 Virtual reality for pediatric traumatic brain injury rehabilitation
02/21/2018 Genetic risk score could help predict patient’s quality of life after traumatic brain injury
02/20/2018 A review of sleep disturbances following traumatic brain injury
02/20/2018 FDA approves first blood test to help diagnose brain injuries
02/16/2018 Recovery following pediatric traumatic brain injury
02/15/2018 The effects of timing and intensity of neurorehabilitation on functional outcome after traumatic brain injury
02/14/2018 Effectiveness of occupation and activity-based interventions for people with traumatic brain injury
02/13/2018 Traumatic brain injury history is associated with an earlier age of dementia onset
02/13/2018 Women more likely to suffer sports-related concussions
02/12/2018 Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on chronic central pain after mild traumatic brain injury
02/09/2018 Predicting the trajectory of participation after traumatic brain injury
02/09/2018 A tiny pulse of electricity can help the brain form lasting memories
02/08/2018 A systematic review and meta-analysis of sleep architecture and chronic traumatic brain injury
02/07/2018 Changes in oculomotor function in young adults with mild traumatic brain injury
02/06/2018 Transcranial ultrasound stimulation improves long-term functional outcomes and protects against brain damage in traumatic brain injury
02/06/2018 Could a vaccine protect football players from concussion?
02/02/2018 Impaired theory of mind in adults with traumatic brain injury
02/01/2018 Headache following head injury: a population-based longitudinal cohort study
02/01/2018 Concussions tied to rise in dementia risk decades later
01/31/2018 Effects of fatigue, driving status, cognition, and depression on participation in adults with traumatic brain injury
01/30/2018 Impact & blast traumatic brain injury: Implications for therapy
01/29/2018 The potential of stem cells in treatment of traumatic brain injury
01/26/2018 Efficacy of melatonin for sleep disturbance following traumatic brain injury
01/25/2018 A case of traumatic brain injury presenting with musical hallucinations
01/24/2018 Depression: The often overlooked sequela of head trauma
01/23/2018 The association between premorbid conditions in school-aged children with prolonged concussion recovery
01/22/2018 Risk of erectile dysfunction after traumatic brain injury
01/22/2018 Repeated head hits, not just concussions, may lead to a type of chronic brain damage
01/19/2018 Association between bipolar disorder and subsequent traumatic brain injury
01/19/2018 Brain protein changes could explain how concussions affect patients
01/18/2018 Traumatic Brain Injury: A potential cause of violent crime?
01/17/2018 Effect of age and sex on hospital readmission in traumatic brain injury
01/17/2018 Research uncovers new link between head trauma, CTE, and ALS
01/16/2018 Cognitive behavioral intervention compared to telephone counseling early after mild traumatic brain injury
01/15/2018 Effects of neurofeedback on the short-term memory and continuous attention of patients with moderate traumatic brain injury
01/12/2018 Growing literature but limited evidence: A systematic review regarding prebiotic and probiotic interventions for those with traumatic brain injury
01/12/2018 Team finds that brain implants can rely on more than neurons to function
01/11/2018 A retrospective analysis of the relationship between facial injury and mild traumatic brain injury
01/10/2018 Psychosocial and executive function recovery trajectories one year after pediatric traumatic brain injury: The influence of age and injury severity
01/09/2018 Concussion in adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis
01/08/2018 Dizziness-related disability following mild-moderate traumatic brain injury
01/05/2018 Predicting fatigue 12 months after child traumatic brain injury
01/04/2018 The prevalence of traumatic brain injury, comorbid anxiety and other psychiatric disorders in an outpatient child and adolescent mental health service
01/03/2018 Does the fear avoidance model explain persistent symptoms after traumatic brain injury?
01/02/2018 Self-awareness four years after severe traumatic brain injury

via Traumatic Brain Injury Resource Guide – Brain Injury News

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[WEB SITE] Intimate partner violence and traumatic brain injury: An “invisible” public health epidemic

While studying brain injuries in the mid-1990s, I began volunteering in a domestic violence shelter. I noticed that the abuse and problems many women reported were consistent with possibly experiencing concussions. Women reported many acts of violence that could cause trauma to the brain, as well as many post-concussive symptoms. Shockingly, my search for literature on this topic yielded zero results.

When I decided to focus my graduate work on this topic, I was even more shocked by what I learned from women who had experienced intimate partner violence (IPV). Of the 99 women I interviewed, 75% reported at least one traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained from their partners and about half reported more than one — oftentimes many more than one. Also, as I predicted, the more brain injuries a woman reported, the more poorly she tended to perform on cognitive tasks such as learning and remembering a list of words. Additionally, having more brain injuries was associated with higher levels of psychological distress such as worry, depression, and anxiety.

When I published these results, I was excited about the possibility of bringing much needed awareness and research attention to this topic. Unfortunately, over 20 years later — despite the plethora of concussion-related research in athletics and the military — concussion-related research in the context of intimate partner violence remains scant, representing a barely recognized and highly understudied public health epidemic.

What do we know about intimate partner violence-related traumatic brain injuries?

First, we need to understand that an estimated one in three women experience some type of physical or sexual partner violence in their lifetimes. IPV is not a rare event, and it traverses all socioeconomic boundaries. It is the number one cause of homicide for women and the number one cause of violence to women. For many reasons, including the stigma of being abused, many women hide their IPV — so the chances that we all know personally at least a few people who have sustained IPV are quite high.

Though we lack good epidemiological data on the number of women sustaining brain injuries from their partners, the limited data that we do have suggest that the numbers are in the millions in the US alone. Most of these TBIs are mild and are unacknowledged, untreated, and repetitive. Consequently, many women are at risk for persistent post-concussive syndrome with completely unknown longer-term health risks.

What are the signs and symptoms of IPV-related TBI?

A concussion, by definition, is a traumatic brain injury (TBI). All that is required for someone to sustain a TBI or concussion is an alteration in consciousness after some type of external trauma or force to the brain. For example, either being hit in the head with a hard object (such as a fist), or having a head hit against a hard object (such as a wall or floor), can cause a TBI. If this force results in confusion, memory loss around the event, or loss of consciousness, this is a TBI. Dizziness or seeing stars or spots following such a force can also indicate a TBI. A loss of consciousness is not required, and in fact does not occur in the majority of mild TBIs.

There are often no physical signs that a TBI has occurred. Recognizing that an IPV-related TBI has occurred will typically involve asking the woman about her experience following a blow to the head or violent force to the brain, and then listening for signs of an alteration of consciousness (such as confusion, memory loss, loss of consciousness). Within the next days or week, a range of physical, emotional, behavioral, or cognitive issues may indicate post-concussive symptoms that could include

  • headaches
  • dizziness
  • feeling depressed or tearful
  • being irritable or easily angered
  • frustration
  • restlessness
  • having poor concentration
  • sleep disturbances
  • forgetfulness
  • taking longer to think.

If a TBI is suspected, a woman should see a doctor if possible. Sustaining additional TBIs while still symptomatic will likely increase the time to recovery, and possibly increase the likelihood of more long-term difficulties.

What can we do?

An important component of addressing IPV-related TBI is to raise awareness and destigmatize intimate partner violence. IPV is unfortunately quite common, and some estimates suggest that millions of women may be sustaining unacknowledged, unaddressed, and often repetitive mild TBIs or concussions from their partners. Talking openly and honestly about this problem, especially in cases were abuse may be suspected, is critical. As we open up this conversation about the commonality of IPV with nonjudgmental acceptance of a woman’s experience, we will be in a better place to hear, understand, and support women who may be unknowing members of this invisible public health epidemic.

Resources

If you or someone you know is experiencing intimate partner violence, The Hotline is a 24/7 support service that has a wealth of resources, including access to service providers and shelters across the US.

Follow me on Twitter @EveValera2

 

via Intimate partner violence and traumatic brain injury: An “invisible” public health epidemic – Harvard Health Blog – Harvard Health Publishing

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[WEB SITE] 14 People Living With Traumatic Brain Injury Explain What It’s Like

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability in the United States, contributing to about 30 percent of all injury deaths, according to The Center for Disease Control and Prevention. People who survive a TBI can face a wide range of side effects, ranging from ones that may last a few days to lifelong disabilities.

The Mighty worked with the Traumatic Brain Injury Support Facebook page to ask people affected by TBI what they wish others understood about their conditions.

This is what they had to say:

1. “People need to learn to not judge you because of it. It makes it more difficult for us to keep moving on in the right direction.” — Erin Fox

2. “I am still capable of doing lots of things. I have worked really, really hard to overcome my injury and although I now suffer from epilepsy and use a seizure alert dog, I am still the smart, capable, funny uncommonly kind person I’ve always been. Stop telling me I can’t and start helping me reach my next goal.” — Kat Mac Kenzie

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3. “Remembering things is difficult. I’m not being lazy by only working a few hours a day or needing days off during a busy time — I just need more rest to function than you do… Changes take time for me to adjust to. What works for one person doesn’t always work for me.” — Sara Hill

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4. “I want nothing more than to be ‘better’ and not be judged like I’m a deadbeat for not being what I once was.” — Elizabeth Keene Alton

5. “The ‘new’ version of myself has very different needs than the old me. I need more rest. I need more time to form thoughts into words. I need more time to complete seemingly simple tasks. And I need my loved ones to realize and be patient with the fact that my emotions are so much harder to manage than they used to be. I still love my partner and my kids, maybe even more than ever, but I also need more solitude than I’ve ever needed before. I need compassion and cooperation. I need love and comfort. I miss the old me so so much… Raising awareness about this issue will be the first thing on my plate, once I can manage to claw my way back to some normalcy… For now, I need my sense of humor more than ever. Because it’s laugh and learn or cry and die, baby. And crying hurts the head.” — Kendra Partida

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6. “My injury may be invisible, but my life has been turned upside down. I will never be the same again.” — Christina Chalgren

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7. “Never assume a person who has difficulty communicating has nothing to say. They may have plenty to say. They just say things a little differently. Never assume their brain doesn’t work, because it does. It just may work a little differently than ours.” — Stacy Sekinger

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8. “Be patient with us as we learn to be patient with ourselves.” — Cindy Williams

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9. “I need help. To plan a day. A doctors appointment. I need someone to go with me. I need help to shop, cook and clean. I need help to find my limits and rest enough, but I also need gentle support to take small walks and do gentle 2-minute yoga so my body doesn’t stop working altogether. I need friends who come by and say ‘Hi.’ I need hugs. I need to vent and help to look for any sort of silver linings so I don’t go mad. I need new hobbies that are gentle to get my mind off my problems ,and I need help to get started. I need help to help myself.” — Catriona Thomsen

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10. “My brain takes different paths to understanding and explaining. It’s not a straight road, but one with detours.” — Keli Hanks

11. “You have no idea how much effort I have to put into all I do. Things I just did automatically prior to TBI require so much work. Everyone goes through moments in their lives which are difficult. For most there is an end in sight, a goal to work towards or for. I have no idea when my difficulties are going to lessen or even if they will. Some days having no ‘finish line’ sucks.” — Amiee Liz

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12. “No we’re not the same person we used to be. We’re alive. But we can create a new journey, learn old stuff and new stuff. The strength and determination it takes to learn, try, try, try again, fall down and get back up is painstaking, but worth it.” — Julia Hewitt

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13. “I live by my systems. I have to have a schedule or I am lost. Don’t freak on me if I get clingy in a new environment. Things that are easy for you are challenging for me. Also, just because I look OK doesn’t mean anything. I have worked for years to get where I am now.” — Nancy Davis

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14. “As much as I wish things would go back to normal for her, this is our new normal and I’m OK with that.” — Emily Reigle

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via 14 People Living With Traumatic Brain Injury Explain What It’s Like | The Mighty

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[BLOG POST] Tracy Morgan’s SNL Return Draws Attention to TBI Myths

Tracy Morgan Brain Injury

Last month, superstar comedian Tracy Morgan returned to the stage of NBC Studio 8H to appear on Saturday Night Live. His initial entrance, marked by clumsy movements, garbled speech and a blank-eyed stare, cut short the audience’s instinctive laughter into a fringe of nervous chuckles. From the sound of it, everyone was asking themselves: “Is this real? Is he okay? Is he…really not okay? Why did they let him on the show if he’s not okay?”Morgan quickly let them in on the joke. The jerky motions and catatonic stare were an act. Morgan is recovering nicely from his traumatic brain injury in June 2014, able to move and speak in much the same way he always did.

“People were wondering, ‘Can he speak? Does he have 100% mental capacity?’ But the truth is I never did! I might actually be a few points higher now.” –Tracy Morgan on his recent TBI recovery.

For those who love Tracy Morgan, it was all in good fun. But for any viewers who live with TBI or care for someone who does, the episode may have sparked conflicting feelings. While we rejoice at a TBI victim’s recovery, it can easily spawn comparisons between their situation and our own. And while members of the TBI community have often emphasized the importance of humor to temper the challenges of daily life, it isn’t always comfortable to see it offered to people who have no idea what the experience of TBI is really like.In the past, we published responses to various myths about TBI. This seemed like a good occasion to revisit those myths, along with a few more that have cropped up in recent years.


Myth: Brain injury comes from hitting your head.Fact: Causes of traumatic brain injury center around the impact of the brain against the skull—but it doesn’t take a blow to the head to cause this. For example, being rear-ended in a car accident might not cause your head to hit anything, but could still result in a TBI.


Myth: TBI is immediately recognizable by a change in the victim’s behavior or consciousness.Fact: TBI is not necessarily accompanied by a loss of consciousness. In fact, TBI victims will oftentimes walk away from the accident, be able to talk about what happened, and seem to be unharmed. The onset of symptoms such as headache and confusion can occur hours or even days after the incident, and issues may only become clear while the victim is involved in certain tasks or environments.


Myth: All people with TBI have the same symptoms.Fact: Since TBI can affect different areas throughout the brain, there is no standard set of symptoms for patients. Symptoms are affected by the type and location of injury. Characteristics, such as physical condition, age and gender of the patient, also have bearing on the severity of symptoms and time necessary for recovery.


Myth: “Mild” traumatic brain injury is no big deal.Fact: While TBIs are commonly classified as mild, moderate or severe, mild brain injuriesare no less traumatic. They can have serious implications, especially if they are sustained repeatedly (as is often the case with atletes). TBI impacts the victim’s memory, learning, adaptation and personality.


Myth: If the MRI, CT Scan or EEG study comes back clean, there is no real brain injury.Fact: According to the Brain Injury Association of America, scans from routine tests are often fail to detect mild brain injury. This is because the damage done is often to the neural connections in the brain, which means it may not involve any swelling or bleeding.For example, the disease made infamous by so many NFL players—chronic traumatic encephalopathy—cannot be traced by routine tests. It can only be diagnosed by staining the brain tissue post-mortem.


Myth: TBI results in loss of the victim’s IQ.Fact: In the past, psychologists would declare patients recovered from TBI because they showed normal results on IQ tests. Now it is widely known that IQ testing covers a narrow range of cognitive abilities. To accurately determine cognitive issues after TBI, it’s necessary for victims to undergo multiple neuropsychological tests.


This objective process covers a much wider range of cognitive abilities than traditional IQ testing. It can reveal deficits that aren’t as easily noticed. In addition, this testing is useful for measuring how cognitive issues change over time.As recently as 2004, the misconceptions about TBI were prevalent even among many in the medical field. The result was detrimental to the recovery of patients, who reentered community, settings still dealing with incomplete recoveries, yet expected to perform at the same level as before their injury took place.The Archives of Clinical Psychology put it with no uncertainty:

“Given the complexity of this injury and the myriad of deficits it may produce, sufficient knowledge about head trauma and its effects are essential to provide proper care.”

With the greater visibility of TBI through outspoken victims like Tracy Morgan, the issue is finally getting the attention it deserves. Long-needed conclusive research and establishment of best practices continues to help patients get their lives back. That is something we can all applaud.

via Tracy Morgan’s SNL Return Draws Attention to TBI Myths

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[BOOK] Converging Clinical and Engineering Research on Neurorehabilitation III – Proceedings – SpringerLink

Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2018), October 16-20, 2018, Pisa, Italy

 Introduction

The book reports on advanced topics in the areas of neurorehabilitation research and practice. It focuses on new methods for interfacing the human nervous system with electronic and mechatronic systems to restore or compensate impaired neural functions. Importantly, the book merges different perspectives, such as the clinical, neurophysiological, and bioengineering ones, to promote, feed and encourage collaborations between clinicians, neuroscientists and engineers.  Based on the 2018 International Conference on Neurorehabilitation (ICNR 2018) held on October 16-20, 2018, in Pisa, Italy,, this book covers various aspects of neurorehabilitation research and practice, including new insights into biomechanics, brain physiology, neuroplasticity, and brain damages and diseases, as well as innovative methods and technologies for studying and/or recovering brain function, from data mining to interface technologies and neuroprosthetics. In this way, it offers a concise, yet comprehensive reference guide to neurosurgeons, rehabilitation physicians, neurologists, and bioengineers. Moreover, by highlighting current challenges in understanding brain diseases as well as in the available technologies and their implementation, the book is also expected to foster new collaborations between the different groups, thus stimulating new ideas and research directions.

Table of contents (233 papers)

Visit Site —> Converging Clinical and Engineering Research on Neurorehabilitation III | SpringerLink

 

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[Factsheet] Understanding TBI: Part 2 – Brain injury impact on individuals functioning – Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC)

Father teaching child with blocks

Written by Thomas Novack, PhD and Tamara Bushnik, PhD in collaboration with the MSKTC

 

A traumatic brain injury interferes with the way the brain normally works. When nerve cells in the brain are damaged, they can no longer send information to each other in the normal way. This causes changes in the person’s behavior and abilities. The injury may cause different problems, depending upon which parts of the brain were damaged most.

There are three general types of problems that can happen after TBI: physical, cognitive and emotional/ behavioral problems. It is impossible to tell early on which specific problems a person will have after a TBI. Problems typically improve as the person recovers, but this may take weeks or months. With some severe injuries changes can take many years.

Structure and function of the brain

The brain is the control center for all human activity, including vital processes (breathing and moving) as well as thinking, judgment, and emotional reactions. Understanding how different parts of the brain work helps us understand how injury affects a person’s abilities and behaviors.

Left vs. Right Brain

  • The brain is divided into two halves (hemispheres). The left half controls movement and sensation in the right side of the body, and the right half controls movement and sensation in the left side. Thus, damage to the right side of the brain may cause movement problems or weakness on the body’s left side.
  • For most people, the left half of the brain is responsible for verbal and logical functions including language (listening, reading, speaking, and writing), thought and memory involving words.
  • The right half is responsible for nonverbal and intuitive functions such as putting bits of information together to make up an entire picture, recognizing oral and visual patterns and designs (music and art), and expressing and understanding emotions.

Brain Areas & Associated Functions

The brain is made up of six parts that can be injured in a head injury. The effect of a brain injury is partially determined by the location of the injury. Sometimes only a single area is affected, but in most cases of TBI multiple areas have been injured. When all areas of the brain are affected, the injury can be very severe.

Image of Brain with Lobe Information

Six parts Functions
Brain Stem
  • Breathing
  • Heart Rate
  • Swallowing
  • Reflexes for seeing and hearing
  • Controls sweating, blood pressure, digestion, temperature
  • Affects level of alertness
  • Ability to sleep
  • Sense of balance
Cerebellum
  • Coordination of voluntary movement
  • Balance and equilibrium
  • Some memory for reflex motor acts
Frontal Lobe
  • How we know what we are doing within our environment
  • How we initiate activity in response to our environment
  • Judgments we make about what occurs in our daily activities
  • Controls our emotional response
  • Controls our expressive language
  • Assigns meaning to the words we choose
  • Involves word associations
  • Memory for habits and motor activities
  • Flexibility of thought, planning and organizing
  • Understanding abstract concepts
  • Reasoning and problem solving
Parietal Lobe
  • Visual attention
  • Touch perception
  • Goal directed voluntary movements
  • Manipulation of objects
  • Integration of different senses
Occipital Lobes
  • Vision
Temporal Lobes
  • Hearing ability
  • Memory aquisition
  • Some visual perceptions such as face recognition and object identification
  • Categorization of objects
  • Understanding or processing verbal information
  • Emotion

Physical Problems

Most people with TBI are able to walk and use their hands within 6-12 months after injury. In most cases, the physical difficulties do not prevent a return to independent living, including work and driving.

In the long term the TBI may reduce coordination or produce weakness and problems with balance. For example, a person with TBI may have difficulty playing sports as well as they did before the injury. They also may not be able to maintain activity for very long due to fatigue.

Cognitive (Thinking) Problems

  • Individuals with a moderate-to-severe brain injury often have problems in basic cognitive (thinking) skills such as paying attention, concentrating, and remembering new information and events.
  • They may think slowly, speak slowly and solve problems slowly.
  • They may become confused easily when normal routines are changed or when things become too noisy or hectic around them.
  • They may stick to a task too long, being unable to switch to different task when having difficulties.
  • On the other hand, they may jump at the first solution they see without thinking it through.
  • They may have speech and language problems, such as trouble finding the right word or understanding others.
  • After brain injury, a person may have trouble with all the complex cognitive activities necessary to be independent and competent in our complex world. The brain processes large amounts of complex information all the time that allows us to function independently in our daily lives. This activity is called executive function because it means being the executive or being in charge of one’s own life.

Emotional/Behavioral Problems

Behavioral and emotional difficulties are common and can be the result of several causes:

  • First, the changes can come directly from damage to brain tissue. This is especially true for injuries to the frontal lobe, which controls emotion and behavior.
  • Second, cognitive problems may lead to emotional changes or make them worse. For example, a person who cannot pay attention well enough to follow a conversation may become very frustrated and upset in those situations.
  • Third, it is understandable for people with TBI to have strong emotional reactions to the major life changes that are caused by the injury. For example, loss of job and income, changes in family roles, and needing supervision for the first time in one’s adult life can cause frustration and depression.

Brain injury can bring on disturbing new behaviors or change a person’s personality. This is very distressing to both the person with the TBI and the family. These behaviors may include:

  • Restlessness
  • Acting more dependent on others
  • Emotional or mood swings
  • Lack of motivation
  • Irritability
  • Aggression
  • Lethargy
  • Acting inappropriately in different situations
  • Lack of self-awareness. Injured individuals may be unaware that they have changed or have problems. This can be due to the brain damage itself or to a denial of what’s really going on in order to avoid fully facing the seriousness of their condition.

Fortunately, with rehabilitation training, therapy and other supports, the person can learn to manage these emotional and behavioral problems.

Disclaimer

This information is not meant to replace the advice from a medical professional. You should consult your health care provider regarding specific medical concerns or treatment.

Source

Our health information content is based on research evidence whenever available and represents the consensus of expert opinion of the TBI Model Systems directors.

Our health information content is based on research evidence and/or professional consensus and has been reviewed and approved by an editorial team of experts from the TBI Model Systems.

Authorship

Understanding TBI was developed by Thomas Novack, PhD and Tamara Bushnik, PhD in collaboration with the Model System Knowledge Translation Center. Portions of this document were adapted from materials developed by the University of Alabama TBIMS, Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation, New York TBIMS, Mayo Clinic TBIMS, Moss TBIMS, and from Picking up the pieces after TBI: A guide for Family Members, by Angelle M. Sander, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine (2002).

via Understanding TBI: Part 2 – Brain injury impact on individuals functioning | Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC)

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[Infographic] TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY – Brain Injury Symptoms

traumatic-brain-injury-infographic

 

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[BLOG POST] Why do people act differently towards a person after their TBI?

Why do people act differently towards a person after their TBI?

Why do people act differently towards a person after a TBI? Many times, it’s because they can’t handle the truth!

By Bill Herrin

After a traumatic brain injury, acceptance is one of the first steps toward recovery…even if recovery is a long way off. When you evaluate your own personal situation and work to be content within your life’s new parameters – that is basically acceptance. Although TBI can make a huge change in a survivor’s behavior, patience, temper, attitudes, etc. – it also can cause a huge change in the people around us – and in how they act toward us. The fact is that people may not be able to handle the truth because the truth they’re facing is that you’ve changed. You’re still the same person that they know and love, but it’s the adapting part that is awkward for them (which, in turn, makes it awkward for you, too). Brain injury not only affects the TBI survivor, but it affects everyone in their life. This is one of the parts of TBI that can bring misunderstandings, judgment, and often, isolation…the truth is hard to handle for family and friends. Why? Because they don’t want to upset you, or possibly just don’t know what to say. Often, it’s no more complicated than that.

Workarounds, ideas, and other solutions

The following excerpts are from Lash & Associates tip card titled “Coping with Survival After Brain Injury.”

Brain injury has an odd way of attacking your self-esteem and self-confidence. Maybe you used to consider yourself brilliant, attractive,
handsome, beautiful and just wonderful. Brain injury has a way of landing right on your self-confidence center. Your worth as a person – both before and after your brain injury – is about more than how well you can do this or that. Don’t think of yourself as less of a person since your brain injury because of all the things you can’t do. Look at the love and warmth that you can share. Others may value you for the contents of your soul.*

With that said, how you think about your situation and approach to life could improve – despite how others may acttoward you? Here are a few more great bits of advice from the tip card titled “Coping with Survival After Brain Injury.” You’ll find that acceptance takes the focus off complaining, of fault-finding of others, and will make you see things in a more meaningful and positive light.*

For example, You can moan, groan, complain, be angry, and spend your time asking WHY did this happen to me? You can be angry at whoever and however, it happened. Be angry on a daily basis. Drink and do drugs to escape…OR you can acknowledge and accept that it happened. You certainly don’t have to like it or be happy about it, but acknowledge that it happened and move forward. Do the best you can with whatever you can. Work on getting to your “New Normal” which isn’t going to be the same as your “Old Normal.”*

If you ask yourself, whether you are religious or not, “Why did God do this to me?” – maybe instead, take the approach of asking yourself, “I was saved for some reason, what is it?”*

You may figure that you have enough of your own problems to deal with and avoid helping others – OR you could work to prevent brain injuries. Tell people your story in the hopes that they won’t have to walk down this road.*

If you let your anger and sadness spill throughout your life, and you take it out on those around you-you could (instead) be sad, but acknowledge that you aren’t the same as you used to be. Meet new people who may understand some of your challenges.*

 

Do you see the sharp contrast in thinking and the approach here? One approach is wallowing in self-pity, and the other changes the focus to living life to the utmost, loving people despite how they may act, and hopefully inspiring others that are also survivors. When you feel angry or sad that your “terrible family or friends” are not loyal, or may not come to visit you enough – look at the other side of the coin – maybe your partner / husband / wife / parents / kids / siblings / other friends stand by you, thank them sincerely and deeply for their loyalty, love and commitment. They didn’t ask for this any more than you did!*

*(Reference: From the Lash & Associates tip card titled “Coping with Survival After Brain Injury,” by John W. Richards, MBA, MSW, Survivor.)

 

Coping becomes Hoping

When it comes to family and friends’ emotional reactions to your TBI, there are some things to keep in mind. When an individual has a brain injury, most families go through the entire range of emotions. There is fear, anger, hope, despair, and even joy at times. These emotions are often seen as negative (fear, despair, anger) or positive (joy and hope). Each emotion affects how a family member acts and responds to others. Try to use your emotions effectively rather than allowing them to control or overwhelm you.**

You may have felt like you were on a roller coaster of emotions soon after the brain injury occurred. Every day there were unfamiliar terms, complicated medical information and difficult questions that often could not be answered. Your emotions may change over time but they continue to be powerful feelings. Every member of your family may feel a wide range of emotions. Some may be similar to yours; others may be different. All emotions need to be respected. It’s important to let everyone in your family know that it’s okay to feel angry, afraid, sad, helpless, and overwhelmed. It’s what you do with these emotions that matter.**

One of the hardest things to realize when you’ve been through huge life changes after TBI is that negative emotions, anger, sadness, and fear can be negative and destructive. But without them, you would lose valuable energy and perspective. They can help you not only survive, but thrive in the aftermath of a brain injury to you, or a member of your family. Imagine that! The takeaway from negative fear, sadness, anger, etc., is that it motivates you to improve your attitudes – and the result will be an overall improvement of your outlook on life, despite any setbacks.**

 

Handling Emotions When People Act Differently After a TBI

In closing, here is a small, but important checklist that could offer some “life hacks” to get on the right track, and away from feeling bad 
about your situation…this is only a small list, and there could certainly be more added – but in the interest of time, these are good to start off with.

Tips for handling your emotions…

✓ Stay in the moment.

Rather than wishing for the moment to pass, ask yourself what exactly this moment is about.**

✓ Allow emotions to subside or quiet.

Instead of trying to hold onto an emotion, be aware when it lessens. Notice the emotion that replaces it. Why this emotion now? What triggered it? How can it help you?**

✓ Review and reflect.

Keep a journal of your different emotions and experiences. It is often easier to understand your feelings after some time has passed. Reading your journal days, weeks, months or even years later gives you a different outlook. This can help you understand what you were feeling and why. Review and reflection can help you use your emotions effectively or change them.**

✓ Find someone you trust.

If you are feeling overwhelmed by an emotion, share it with someone you trust. Ask for the person’s views and ideas. By sharing the emotion, you will find it more manageable and less overwhelming.**

✓ Consider the opposite emotion.

Sometimes an emotion can block you from taking action or it may prevent you from getting action from someone else. When this happens, try choosing the opposite emotion and ask yourself what you’d do if you felt that way instead. For example, if you are feeling angry but need to make a request, ask yourself, “How would I say this if I were feeling warmly towards this person?”**

**Excerpted from “Emotions – Hope after brain injury”, by Ann V. Deaton, Ph.D.

 

Final Thoughts

The takeaway (hopefully) is that working on acceptance of your new life, and then working through your feelings (about yourself and others’ actions toward you) will bring positive change to everyone involved. Life is precious, and sometimes people just need time to sort things out – either as a TBI survivor or as the friend or loved one of a TBI survivor. Make the most of each day. Progress comes in different forms, different levels, and sometimes it’s elusive – but hope springs eternal. Choose hope.

Lash & Associates offers lots of books and products for the TBI Community, click here to see our monthly specials!
Or, click here to see our entire store

via https://www.lapublishing.com/blog/2018/people-act-differently-tbi/

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[ARTICLE] Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury: clinical perspectives – Full Text

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well recognized public health problem worldwide. TBI has previously been considered as a rare cause of hypopituitarism, but an increased prevalence of neuroendocrine dysfunction in patients with TBI has been reported during the last 15 years in most of the retrospective and prospective studies. Based on data in the current literature, approximately 15%–20% of TBI patients develop chronic hypopituitarism, which clearly suggests that TBI-induced hypopituitarism is frequent in contrast with previous assumptions. This review summarizes the current data on TBI-induced hypopituitarism and briefly discusses some clinical perspectives on post-traumatic anterior pituitary hormone deficiency.

Introduction

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) could be defined as a change in brain function or other evidence of brain pathology caused by external forces,1 and is a well recognized public health problem worldwide. A substantial number of people with TBI are seen in emergency departments; the great majority, approximately 235,000 each year, are hospitalized because of non-fatal TBI and nearly 50,000 die according to reports from the USA. Further, the overall annual incidence of TBI in the USA has been reported to be 506 per 100,000 population.2 The severity ratio of hospitalized TBI patients was reported to be approximately 22:1.5:1 for mild to moderate to severe cases, respectively.3 Thus, there is no doubt that TBI is one of the most common causes of mortality and long-term disability among young adults. The main causes of TBI are road traffic accidents (the leading cause, accounting for 50% of all cases), falls, violence-related incidents, sports-related head trauma (hockey, soccer, football), combative sports (boxing and kickboxing) characterized by chronic repetitive head trauma, and war-related accidents, including blast injuries.47

Although TBI has previously been considered as a rare cause of hypopituitarism, an increased prevalence of neuroendocrine dysfunction in patients with TBI has been reported during the last 15 years in most of the retrospective and prospective studies.818 This review summarizes the current data on TBI-induced hypopituitarism and briefly discusses some clinical perspectives on post-traumatic anterior pituitary hormone deficiency.[…]

 

Continue —> Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury: clinical perspectives

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