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[ARTICLE] Randomized controlled trial of robot-assisted gait training with dorsiflexion assistance on chronic stroke patients wearing ankle-foot-orthosis – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Robot-assisted ankle-foot-orthosis (AFO) can provide immediate powered ankle assistance in post-stroke gait training. Our research team has developed a novel lightweight portable robot-assisted AFO which is capable of detecting walking intentions using sensor feedback of wearer’s gait pattern. This study aims to investigate the therapeutic effects of robot-assisted gait training with ankle dorsiflexion assistance.

Methods

This was a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Nineteen chronic stroke patients with motor impairment at ankle participated in 20-session robot-assisted gait training for about five weeks, with 30-min over-ground walking and stair ambulation practices. Robot-assisted AFO either provided active powered ankle assistance during swing phase in Robotic Group (n = 9), or torque impedance at ankle joint as passive AFO in Sham Group (n = 10). Functional assessments were performed before and after the 20-session gait training with 3-month Follow-up. Primary outcome measure was gait independency assessed by Functional Ambulatory Category (FAC). Secondary outcome measures were clinical scores including Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), Six-minute Walk Test (SMWT), supplemented by gait analysis. All outcome measures were performed in unassisted gait after patients had taken off the robot-assisted AFO. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance was conducted to test the group differences referenced to clinical scores before training.

Results

After 20-session robot-assisted gait training with ankle dorsiflexion assistance, the active ankle assistance in Robotic Group induced changes in gait pattern with improved gait independency (all patients FAC ≥ 5 post-training and 3-month follow-up), motor recovery, walking speed, and greater confidence in affected side loading response (vertical ground reaction force + 1.49 N/kg, peak braking force + 0.24 N/kg) with heel strike instead of flat foot touch-down at initial contact (foot tilting + 1.91°). Sham Group reported reduction in affected leg range of motion (ankle dorsiflexion − 2.36° and knee flexion − 8.48°) during swing.

Conclusions

Robot-assisted gait training with ankle dorsiflexion assistance could improve gait independency and help stroke patients developing confidence in weight acceptance, but future development of robot-assisted AFO should consider more lightweight and custom-fit design.

Background

Stroke is caused by intracranial haemorrhage or thrombosis, which cuts off arterial supply to brain tissue and usually damages the motor pathway of the central nervous system affecting one side of the body. About half of the stroke survivors cannot walk at stroke onset, but they have 60% chance to regain independent walking after rehabilitation [1]. Reduced descending neural drive to the paretic ankle joint causes muscle weakness and spasticity, often accompanied with drop foot which is characterized by the foot pointing downward and dragging on the ground during walking [23]. To maintain sufficient foot clearance in swing phase, people with dropped foot have to compensate either by hip hiking with exaggerated flexion in hip and knee joints, or circumduction gait with the body leaning on the unaffected side and the leg swinging outward through an arc away from the midline [456]. These inefficient asymmetric gait patterns hinder the walking ability and contribute to slower walking speed [78], increasing risk of falling [910], and greater energy expenditure [11]. Poor mobility results in sedentary lifestyle and limited physical exercise [12], which further deteriorates lower-limb functionality.

Foot drop can be managed using ankle-foot-orthosis (AFO), which is rigid or articulated ankle brace that controls ankle range of motion (ROM). Meta-analysis shows walking in conventional AFO has immediate or short-term beneficial effects on gait pattern and mobility of stroke patients, including an overall increase in ankle dorsiflexion throughout gait cycle, improvements in Functional Ambulatory Category (FAC), walking speed, and stairs-climbing speed [131415]. Recent development in robot-assisted AFO demonstrates power assistance at ankle joint can facilitate walking of patients presenting with foot drop, by actively assisting ankle dorsiflexion for foot clearance in swing phase and minimizing occurrence of foot slap at initial contact [161718]. Previous studies only evaluated the immediate effects of stroke patients walking in passive AFO [1415] or robot-assisted AFO [1920], but they were not sure whether any assistive effects could be carried over to unassisted gait after the patients had taken off the devices, i.e. the therapeutic effects.

Neuroscience studies suggest the brain is capable of altering its functions and structures for adapting to internal and external environment; an ability known as neuroplasticity [22122]. Researches show intensive repetitive skill training can enhance neuroplasticity and promote motor relearning of stroke patients [2324], which is achievable utilizing robot-assistance in clinical setting. The Anklebot that was developed in MIT can provide power assistance to stroke patients performing repetitive voluntary ankle sagittal movements in seated position, and a single-arm pilot study reports stroke patients (n = 8) had improved volitional ankle control and spatial-temporal gait parameters after 6-week 18-session training using the Anklebot [25]; 30-min seated skill training at ankle joint can induce plastic changes in cortical excitability in area controlling dorsiflexor [26]. Thus robot-assisted AFO with dorsiflexion assistance can potentially stimulate motor recovery of stroke patients with foot drop problem. Neuroscience studies further show the functional outcome of neuroplasticity is task-specific and dependent on the training nature [2212227]. It implies that in order to improve independent walking ability, stroke patients are expected to practise real over-ground walking instead of seated training. Incorporation of stair ambulation into gait training could facilitate generalization towards activity of daily-living, which requires stroke patients to perform skilled ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion when they are negotiating steps. Another characteristics of neuroplasticity is the importance of salient experiences for motor relearning from error correction [22122]. During gait training, powered ankle assistance from a robot-assisted AFO could serve as a source of salient proprioceptive feedback synchronized to gait pattern [28]. The robot can strengthen the experience-driven neuroplasticity by producing this proprioceptive feedback at each successfully triggered ankle power assistance [28]. In summary, researches on experience-driven neuroplasticity suggest stroke patients presenting with foot drop problem can potentially restore some level of independent walking ability through robot-assisted gait training with ankle dorsiflexion assistance on over-ground walking and stair ambulation.

To our knowledge, up to now no randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been carried out to validate the rehabilitation approach of robot-assisted AFO [2930]. The current study aims to evaluate whether gait training with robot-assisted AFO with dorsiflexion assistance can bring greater improvement in independent walking ability than training with passive AFO. In each session, stroke patients were trained in 20-min over-ground walking and 10-min stair ambulation. Assessments on the participating stroke patients focused on functional changes in unassisted gait after they had discontinued to wear the devices, i.e. the therapeutic effects. A meta-analysis study recommends FAC to be the primary outcome measure for clinical trials involving electromechanical gait training [30]. FAC is a reliable measurement of independent walking ability on level ground walking and stair ambulation, which is a good prediction of independent community walking post-stroke [31]. The demonstration of safety and effectiveness of the robot-assisted gait training can have positive impact on post-stroke rehabilitation and can potentially establish a new treatment method for stroke patients presenting with foot drop.[…]

 

Continue —>  Randomized controlled trial of robot-assisted gait training with dorsiflexion assistance on chronic stroke patients wearing ankle-foot-orthosis | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Figure 1

Fig. 1a Robot-assisted AFO, and b Stroke patients walking on stairs wearing the robot-assisted AFO

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[WEB SITE] Myoelectric Arm Orthosis Designed for Adolescents

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MyProadolescent

 

Myomo Inc announces that its MyoPro myoelectric arm orthosis is now available to adolescents to help restore upper limb functionality in paralyzed or weakened arms.

In order to facilitate MyoPro fittings and delivery to adolescent patients, Myomo has partnered with Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley (Chicago area), and is exploring partnerships with additional youth institutions and children’s hospitals, according to a media release from Cambridge, Mass-based Myomo Inc.

Paul R. Gudonis, chairman and CEO of Myomo, says in the release that, “For adolescents who suffer from a neuromuscular condition like cerebral palsy or BPI, and whose options for treatment and care have been limited, MyoPro represents new hope. We can now provide these teens with a chance to help restore function in their arms and, as a result, improve their quality of life.”

Kathy Schrock, vice president of clinical services, Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley, Illinois, adds that, “Our partnership provides Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley with cutting-edge technology for our therapists and clients. MyoPro will help develop arm control for adolescent clients with neurological disorders, giving them greater independence.”

Based on patented technology developed at MIT, MyoPro is designed to sense a patient’s own EMG signals through noninvasive sensors and restore function to the paralyzed or weakened arm. This allows MyoPro users to perform activities of daily living including feeding themselves, carrying objects, and doing household tasks.

[Source(s): Myomo Inc, Business Wire]

 

via Myoelectric Arm Orthosis Designed for Adolescents – Rehab Managment

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Rehabilitation in Movement Disorders

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Rehabilitation Measures | Shirley Ryan AbilityLab – Formerly RIC

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Browse our database of instruments to find the right treatment for your patients or research projects. Questions? Please contact us at rehabmeasures@sralab.org

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For those visiting our site for the first time or even if you just need a refresher, we’re happy to provide some of the common terms & acronyms and their definitions.

For more visit —> Rehabilitation Measures | Shirley Ryan AbilityLab – Formerly RIC

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[Editorial] Investigating Brain Activity After Acquired and Traumatic Brain Injury: Applications of Functional MRI

  • 1Stroke, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ, United States
  • 2Neuropsychology and Neuroscience, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ, United States
  • 3Traumatic Brain Injury, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ, United States

Editorial on the Research Topic

Investigating Brain Activity After Acquired and Traumatic Brain Injury: Applications of Functional MRI

Every year, approximately 795,000 people in the United States are affected by stroke and 2.8 million lives are impacted by traumatic brain injury (TBI) (1). Stroke and TBI are also major causes of serious long-term disability, reducing mobility, and impacting thinking, memory, sensation, and emotional functioning. Neuroscience holds great promise in addressing the needs of persons with a history of stroke or TBI by improving the current understanding of brain injury and recovery mechanisms. This is the first step in working to inform and improve the available treatments.

While a great many functional neuroimaging methods exist for studying the healthy brain, such methods have not received widespread acceptance in characterizing patient groups. Several methodological barriers may explain why. First, patient populations can be diverse in terms of injury location and stages of recovery. Accurate measurement and interpretation of functional neuroimaging signal in the damaged brain can also pose a challenge, because stroke and TBI can dramatically alter cerebral blood flow, even in areas that are not affected by a structural lesion (23). Finally, correct interpretation of findings in light of impaired and/or changing behavioral function depends on careful experimental design and precise a priorioperational definitions of the anticipated effects.

Despite these challenges, or, perhaps, because of them, functional neuroimaging is a promising area of investigation in TBI and stroke. This Research Topic is a collection of original research and review articles focused on functional neuroimaging in persons with TBI and stroke. Below, we highlight a few of the most notable findings and ideas from this collection of articles. Readers are encouraged to access the full text articles for more details.

In one of the two review articles, Medaglia provides an overview of fMRI methodology, analyses, and the caveats of applying these analyses to the injured brain. This includes methods, such as seed-based and voxel-based functional connectivity, effective connectivity, including psychophysiological interactions, causal connectivity, and graph analyses. Medaglia discusses the concept of functional re-organization. The term is sometimes used to describe a change in the magnitude of activation or of functional connectivity. It is also used to refer to a re-allocation of function to new brain areas following injury. Medaglia suggests that to improve clarity a precise description of the effect should be provided. Formal tests of re-organization should include a search for areas with activity profile closely resembling that of a damaged area, and with corresponding evidence of recovered behavioral function. Distinguishing different innate recovery mechanisms is especially important in intervention studies, because failing to understand which process may be at work when introducing an intervention, may lead to inadvertent interference with endogenous repair mechanisms.

Nair et al. studied brain activation in acute stroke and healthy older controls participants during a covert verbal fluency task. They controlled for the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response variability across participants using resting state fluctuation amplitude (RSFA) (4). RSFA calibration is thought to eliminate any inter-subject variability due to vascular factors and retain any differences due to neuronal activation factors. They found that after scaling, the BOLD response differences between stroke patients and healthy controls were eliminated. This finding suggests that some of the group differences were due to vascular variables. Additionally, some fine-tuning may be required when scaling with RSFA, perhaps scaling by brain region, rather than across the whole brain.

Bernier et al. applied graph theory to a data set of healthy and TBI subjects with moderate/severe TBI. Their aim was to determine if loss of network differentiation accounts for changes in brain connectivity, specifically hyperconnectivity. This hypothesis was examined within the default mode (DMN) and the task positive network. Supporting other results in the field, they observed hyperconnectivity within the DMN and task positive networks. DMN hyperconnectivity was found to be associated with higher scores on the standardized working memory measure. Thus, the work of these authors demonstrates how fMRI and connectivity analyses can inform the cognitive profile observed following TBI.

The second review in the Research Topics explores a common deficit in TBI. Namely, cognitive control, an executive function that is generally necessary for switching between habitual and goal-directed behavior. In his review, Scheibel talks about functional neuroimaging studies of cognitive control in mild TBI (mTBI). The review draws attention to how the fMRI findings are mixed, with reports of decreased as well as increased brain activation in mTBI, and urges for future studies to aim at recruiting more homogenous samples, as the mixed findings might be explained by the presence of comorbidies in TBI samples.

The original research article by Saleh et al. explored how different approaches to rehabilitation of hand function after stroke can alter brain activity across the sensorimotor brain networks and demonstrates network re-organization discussed in the Medaglia review. Both treatment approaches tested in the study improved hand function. However, only the robot-assisted virtual reality group showed reduction of activity and re-lateralization of activation to ipsilesional cortex, a pattern associated with better arm function in this study and with positive recovery in other studies (5).

A contribution by Möller et al. used arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI to examine fatigue in mTBI during psychomotor vigilance task performance. The mTBI participants showed different patterns of brain activation compared to healthy controls, in addition to higher self-reported fatigue and reductions in performance as the task progressed (fatigability). Together with the self-reported fatigue ratings and task performance, the ASL results suggested the engagement of disparate functional networks compared in mTBI.

fMRI research in stroke and TBI poses a unique set of challenges to researchers. The articles assembled in this Research Topic address some of these challenges. Using methods designed to work in patients with brain lesions, using appropriate controls, and applying network neuroscience tools are a few of the promising solutions. This topic is an important frontier in neuroscience research today offering tangible benefits for public health and is a potential area of growth in the coming years

References

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). U. Centers for Disease con [WWW Document]. (2018). Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/ (Accessed: February 22, 2018).

Google Scholar

2. Brumm KP, Perthen JE, Liu TT, Haist F, Ayalon L, Love T. An arterial spin labeling investigation of cerebral blood flow deficits in chronic stroke survivors. Neuroimage (2010) 51:995–1005. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.03.008

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

3. Hillis AE. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the study of language. Brain Lang (2007) 102:165–75. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2006.04.016

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

4. Kannurpatti SS, Motes MA, Rypma B, Biswal BB. Increasing measurement accuracy of age-related BOLD signal change: minimizing vascular contributions by resting-state-fluctuation-of-amplitude scaling. Hum Brain Mapp (2011) 32:1125–40. doi:10.1002/hbm.21097

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

5. Cramer SC. Repairing the human brain after stroke: I. Mechanisms of spontaneous recovery. Ann Neurol (2008) 63:272–87. doi:10.1002/ana.21393

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

 

via Frontiers | Editorial: Investigating Brain Activity After Acquired and Traumatic Brain Injury: Applications of Functional MRI | Neurology

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[Abstract] Predicting Long-Term Global Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury: Development of a Practical Prognostic Tool Using the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database

For patients surviving serious traumatic brain injury (TBI), families and other stakeholders often desire information on long-term functional prognosis, but accurate and easy-to-use clinical tools are lacking. We aimed to build utilitarian decision trees from commonly collected clinical variables to predict Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) functional levels at 1, 2, and 5 years after moderate-to-severe closed TBI. Flexible classification tree statistical modeling was used on prospectively collected data from the TBI-Model Systems (TBIMS) inception cohort study. Enrollments occurred at 17 designated, or previously designated, TBIMS inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Analysis included all participants with nonpenetrating TBI injured between January 1997 and January 2017. Sample sizes were 10,125 (year-1), 8,821 (year-2), and 6,165 (year-5) after cross-sectional exclusions (death, vegetative state, insufficient post-injury time, and unavailable outcome). In our final models, post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) duration consistently dominated branching hierarchy and was the lone injury characteristic significantly contributing to GOS predictability. Lower-order variables that added predictability were age, pre-morbid education, productivity, and occupational category. Generally, patient outcomes improved with shorter PTA, younger age, greater pre-morbid productivity, and higher pre-morbid vocational or educational achievement. Across all prognostic groups, the best and worst good recovery rates were 65.7% and 10.9%, respectively, and the best and worst severe disability rates were 3.9% and 64.1%. Predictability in test data sets ranged from C-statistic of 0.691 (year-1; confidence interval [CI], 0.675, 0.711) to 0.731 (year-2; CI, 0.724, 0.738). In conclusion, we developed a clinically useful tool to provide prognostic information on long-term functional outcomes for adult survivors of moderate and severe closed TBI. Predictive accuracy for GOS level was demonstrated in an independent test sample. Length of PTA, a clinical marker of injury severity, was by far the most critical outcome determinant.

 

via Predicting Long-Term Global Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury: Development of a Practical Prognostic Tool Using the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database | Journal of Neurotrauma

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[WEB SITE] One Woman, 10 MRI Scans, 10 Different Diagnoses

Cultura RM Exclusive/Sigrid Gombert/Getty Images

An MRI scan is a lot more like a Rorschach test to your radiologist than you’d probably like to imagine.

That’s the summary of a study recently published in The Spine Journal. Researchers sent a 63-year-old woman with lower back pain and a specific set of other symptoms to MRI appointments with ten different radiologists. The radiologists collectively made 49 distinct findings. Zero, however, made it into all ten diagnoses, and only one was reported in nine out of the ten.

Even more alarming: The average report contained between nine and 16 errors, both false-positives and missed diagnoses (which were later found by experts in her specific spinal problem, the comparison points for the study’s researchers). Overall, the study found “poor overall agreement” in radiologists’ opinions of the woman’s condition.

The study differs from past ones in which radiologists viewed MRI results in a research setting and made diagnoses, says co-author Daniel Elgort, vice president of healthcare data analytics and research at the Spreemo Quality Research Institute. “[In those studies] they knew they were being studied, so they made a more careful diagnosis.” Radiologists seeing an average patient are apparently less thorough.

The point of the exercise was to disprove a common misconception among medical consumers. “There is this notion that there are no differences in quality in radiology services,” Elgort says, “that [one] should always decide by price and convenience.”

Radiologists, however, are not the oil change technicians or dry cleaners of the medical world— professions where there is not much difference in performance once one achieves professional-level competency. Instead, the results suggest that some radiology offices are in fact better than others.

While they do not have enough data to prove it, Elgort theorizes that the difference is in cost. Cheaper radiology offices probably employ less experienced staff, use older equipment, cram in appointments, and cut other corners.

“The takeaway should not be, ‘go get the most expensive MRI possible,'” Elgort says. “Healthcare in general isn’t a necessarily a correlation between price and quality. It should definitely be that not every healthcare provider is equally suited to give you the most accurate diagnosis.” He added that patients should seek out radiology labs with specialists in their specific issues.

As for where they found a middle-aged woman willing to get MRI after MRI for weeks, Elgort says they recruited the subject from contacts at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, adding, “She’s a former nurse, so she knows the value of this kind of science.

 

via One Woman, 10 MRI Scans, 10 Different Diagnoses – Tonic

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[ARTICLE] BCI-Based Strategies on Stroke Rehabilitation with Avatar and FES Feedback – Full Text PDF

Stroke is the leading cause of serious and long-term disability worldwide. Some studies have shown that motor imagery (MI) based BCI has a positive effect in poststroke rehabilitation. It could help patients promote the reorganization processes in the damaged brain regions. However, offline motor imagery and conventional online motor imagery with feedback (such as rewarding sounds and movements of an avatar) could not reflect the true intention of the patients. In this study, both virtual limbs and functional electrical stimulation (FES) were used as feedback to provide patients a closed-loop sensorimotor integration for motor rehabilitation. The FES system would activate if the user was imagining hand movement of instructed side. Ten stroke patients (7 male, aged 22-70 years, mean 49.5+-15.1) were involved in this study. All of them participated in BCI-FES rehabilitation training for 4 weeks.The average motor imagery accuracies of the ten patients in the last week were 71.3%, which has improved 3% than that in the first week. Five patients’ Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores have been raised. Patient 6, who has have suffered from stroke over two years, achieved the greatest improvement after rehabilitation training (pre FMA: 20, post FMA: 35). In the aspect of brain patterns, the active patterns of the five patients gradually became centralized and shifted to sensorimotor areas (channel C3 and C4) and premotor area (channel FC3 and FC4).In this study, motor imagery based BCI and FES system were combined to provided stoke patients with a closed-loop sensorimotor integration for motor rehabilitation. Result showed evidences that the BCI-FES system is effective in restoring upper extremities motor function in stroke. In future work, more cases are needed to demonstrate its superiority over conventional therapy and explore the potential role of MI in poststroke rehabilitation.

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via [1805.04986] BCI-Based Strategies on Stroke Rehabilitation with Avatar and FES Feedback

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[ARTICLE] Interactive Design and Development of Real Arm Movements for Application in Rehabilitation – Full Text PDF

Abstract

An interactive real arm movements for application in rehabilitation is designed and
developed. The aim is to encourage hand paralysis patients performing their physical therapy by introducing games application in replacing conventional hand therapy module and methods. In this project, the accelerometer is used for tracking the orientation of the arm. As the arm moves, the values from x, y and z axis from the accelerometer changes and are being read by the Analog Inputs of the Arduino Board. After being read by the Analog Inputs of the Arduino Board, the 3D model moves as well. Solidworks software was used to modeled the hand in which the data is then transferred to Matlab/Simulink using SimMechanicalLink from Mathworks. Lastly, the sensor glove was programmed to work as a controller of games application in hand rehabilitation thus makes it an enjoyable therapy process. […]

Full Text PDF

 

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[WEB SITE] Could robots be counselors? Early research shows positive user experience

 

Many participants in the University of Plymouth study praised the ‘non-judgmental’ nature of the humanoid NAO robot as it delivered its session — with one even saying they preferred it to a human.
Credit: University of Plymouth

New research has shown for the first time that a social robot can deliver a ‘helpful’ and ‘enjoyable’ motivational interview (MI) — a counselling technique designed to support behaviour change.

Many participants in the University of Plymouth study praised the ‘non-judgemental’ nature of the humanoid NAO robot as it delivered its session — with one even saying they preferred it to a human.

Led by the School of Psychology, the study also showed that the robot achieved a fundamental objective of MI as it encouraged participants, who wanted to increase their physical activity, to articulate their goals and dilemmas aloud.

MI is a technique that involves the counsellor supporting and encouraging someone to talk about their need for change, and their reasons for wanting to change.

The role of the interviewer in MI is mainly to evoke a conversation about change and commitment, and the robot was programmed with a set script designed to elicit ideas and conversation on how someone could increase their physical activity.

When finished answering each question, the participant taped the top of NAO’s head to continue, with some sessions lasting up to an hour.

Lead academic Professor Jackie Andrade explained that, because they are perceived as nonjudgmental, robots may have advantages over more humanoid avatars for delivering virtual support for behavioral change.

“We were pleasantly surprised by how easily the participants adapted to the unusual experience of discussing their lifestyle with a robot,” she said. “As we have shown for the first time that a motivational interview delivered by a social robot can elicit out-loud discussion from participants.

“In addition, the participants perceived the interaction as enjoyable, interesting and helpful. Participants found it especially useful to hear themselves talking about their behaviour aloud, and liked the fact that the robot didn’t interrupt, which suggests that this new intervention has a potential advantage over other technology-delivered adaptations of MI.

“Concern about being judged by a human interviewer came across strongly in praise for the non-judgemental nature of the robot, suggesting that robots may be particularly helpful for eliciting talk about sensitive issues.

“The next stage is to undertake a quantitative study, where we can measure whether participants felt that the intervention actually increased their activity levels.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of PlymouthNote: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joana Galvão Gomes da Silva, David J Kavanagh, Tony Belpaeme, Lloyd Taylor, Konna Beeson, Jackie Andrade. Experiences of a Motivational Interview Delivered by a Robot: Qualitative StudyJournal of Medical Internet Research, 2018; 20 (5): e116 DOI: 10.2196/jmir.7737

via Could robots be counselors? Early research shows positive user experience: New research has shown for the first time that a social robot can deliver a ‘helpful’ and ‘enjoyable’ motivational interview — ScienceDaily

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