Posts Tagged Activities of daily living

[Abstract] BIGHand – A bilateral, integrated, and gamified handgrip stroke rehabilitation system for independent at-home exercise – Demo Video

Effective home rehabilitation is important for recovery of hand grip ability in post-stroke individuals. This paper presents BIGHand, a bilateral, integrated, and gamified handgrip stroke rehabilitation system for independent at-home exercise. BIGHand consists of affordable sensor-integrated hardware (Vernier hand dynamometers, Arduino Uno, interface shield) used to obtain real-time grip force data, and a set of exergames designed as parts of an interactive structural rehabilitation program. This program pairs targeted difficulty progression with user-ability scaled controls to create an adaptive, challenging, and enticing rehabilitation environment. This training prepares users for the many activities of daily living (ADLs) by targeting strength, bilateral coordination, hand-eye coordination, speed, endurance, precision, and dynamic grip force adjustment. Multiple measures are taken to engage, motivate, and guide users through the at-home rehabilitation process, including “smart” post-game feedback and in-game goals.

Demo video 

via BIGHand – A bilateral, integrated, and gamified handgrip stroke rehabilitation system for independent at-home exercise

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Effects of Bihemispheric Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A randomized Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study

Abstract

Background and Purpose

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a treatment used in the rehabilitation of stroke patients aiming to improve functionality of the plegic upper extremity. Currently, tDCS is not routinely used in post stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of bihemspheric tDCS combined with physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) on upper extremity motor function.

Methods

Thirty-two stroke inpatients were randomised into 2 groups. All patients received 15 sessions of conventional upper extremity PT and OT over 3 weeks. The tDCS group (n = 16) also received 30 minutes of bihemispheric tDCS and the sham group (n = 16) 30 minutes of sham bihemispheric tDCS simultaneously to OT. Patients were evaluated before and after treatment using the Fugl Meyer upper extremity (FMUE), functional independence measure (FIM), and Brunnstrom stages of stroke recovery (BSSR) by a physiatrist blind to the treatment group

Results

The improvement in FIM was higher in the tDCS group compared to the sham group (P = .001). There was a significant within group improvement in FMUE, FIM and BSSR in those receiving tDCS (P = .001). There was a significant improvement in FIM in the chronic (> 6months) stroke sufferers who received tDCS when compared to those who received sham tDCS and when compared to subacute stroke (3-6 months) sufferers who received tDCS/sham.

Conclusions

Upper extremity motor function in hemiplegic stroke patients improves when bihemispheric tDCS is used alongside conventional PT and OT. The improvement in functionality is greater in chronic stroke patients.

via Effects of Bihemispheric Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A randomized Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study – ScienceDirect

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[VIDEO] RehaCom introduction – YouTube

RehaCom is a modular software used for cognitive therapy. It assists therapist in the rehabilitation of cognitive disorders that affect specific aspects of attention, concentration, memory, perception, activities of daily living and much more.

 

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] A systematic review of personal smart technologies used to improve outcomes in adults with acquired brain injuries

This review aimed to determine the effectiveness of personal smart technologies on outcomes in adults with acquired brain injury.

A systematic literature search was conducted on 30 May 2019. Twelve electronic databases, grey literature databases, PROSPERO, reference list and author citations were searched.

Randomised controlled trials were included if personal smart technology was used to improve independence, goal attainment/function, fatigue or quality of life in adults with acquired brain injury. Data were extracted using a bespoke form and the TIDieR checklist. Studies were graded using the PEDro scale to assess quality of reporting. Meta-analysis was conducted across four studies.

Six studies met the inclusion criteria, generating a total of 244 participants. All studies were of high quality (PEDro ⩾ 6). Interventions included personal digital assistant, smartphone app, mobile phone messaging, Neuropage and an iPad. Reporting of intervention tailoring for individual needs was inconsistent. All studies measured goal attainment/function but none measured independence or fatigue. One study (n = 42) reported a significant increase in memory-specific goal attainment (p = 0.0001) and retrospective memory function (p = 0.042) in favour of the intervention. Another study (n = 8) reported a significant increase in social participation in favour of the intervention (p = 0.01). However, our meta-analyses found no significant effect of personal smart technology on goal attainment, cognitive or psychological function.

At present, there is insufficient evidence to support the clinical benefit of personal smart technologies to improve outcomes in acquired brain injury. Researchers need to conduct more randomised studies to evaluate these interventions and measure their potential effects/harms.

 

via A systematic review of personal smart technologies used to improve outcomes in adults with acquired brain injuries – Jade Kettlewell, Roshan das Nair, Kate Radford,

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Effect of Mirror Therapy on Recovery of Stroke Survivors: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis.

Abstract

Mirror therapy (MT) as a relatively new rehabilitation technique has been widely applied in stroke patients. A number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the effects of MT for stroke survivors. The main purpose of this network meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of MT on motor function, activities of daily living (ADL), and pain perception in stroke survivors. Several databases were searched to identify RCTs evaluating the effects of MT in stroke patients to perform this network meta-analysis. Thirty-seven RCTs (42 analyses, 1685 subjects) were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Standard meta-analysis showed that MT significantly improved of motor function according to the increased Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and decreased Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) score. In addition, ADL was promoted by MT as the elevated Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and Motor Activity Log (MAL) score. Moreover, MT effectively relieved the pain of stroke patients as the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score was reduced. Subgroup analyses and meta-regressions identified that the sources of heterogeneity might be different intervention arms and duration of interventions. Network meta-analysis showed that MT combined with electrical stimulation (ES) for less than 4 weeks along with conventional rehabilitation therapy (CT), and MT accompanied with CT for less than 4 weeks might be the most suitable interventions for improvement of motor function and ADL, respectively. Overall, MT could effectively improve motor function and ADL, as well as relieve pain for stroke survivors. The study was registered at PROSPERO (CRD42017081742).

PMID: 29981364 DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2018.06.044

, , , ,

Leave a comment

[BLOG POST] Home After a Stroke: ADLs Are Where the Repetitions Are

ADLs Are Where the Repetitions Are

Brain plasticity is amazing, but rewiring the brain requires thousands of repetitions (reps).   Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) are a great way to get the reps needed to retrain the brain.
Four examples show why three sets of ten each day cannot compete with ADLs.

1) Twice a day I open my hemiplegic (paralyzed) hand to grasp a tube of toothpaste so my sound hand can remove the cap.  My hand opens again to hold the tube while I put the cap back on.  In nine years I have opened my hand over 5000 times before brushing my teeth.

2)  I have to turn 14 times to prepare cereal with a sliced banana.  I have made this same breakfast for nine years so I have made over 45,000 turns.  Add making a sandwich for lunch and preparing a hot meal for dinner and the number of turns I have made in the kitchen are in the hundreds of thousands.

3)  Shopping is therapy for my hand.  I open my hemiplegic hand to let go of the cart and reach for items with my sound hand.  My hemiplegic hand opens a 2nd time when I grab the cart to move on. My hemiplegic hand opens a 3rd time so I can let go of the cart so I can maneuver to empty the cart in the check-out lane and again to load food into my car.  Pick up 30 items + empty cart + load car means I open my hand 60 + 2 + 2 = 64 times.  64 x 2 visits a week x 9 years means I have opened my hemiplegic hand 59,904 times in the grocery store.

4)  The distance I have walked at the grocery store is huge.  I step away from the shopping cart and bend down or reach up to get items I want.  The S-shaped curves I make to detour around people and other carts require more steps than walking in a straight line.  According to my pedometer I walk 2,000+ steps each time I visit the grocery store.  2,000 x 2 visits a week x nine years = 1,872,000 steps!

via Home After a Stroke: ADLs Are Where the Repetitions Are

, , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] The wearable hand robot: supporting impaired hand function in activities of daily living and rehabilitation

Abstract

Our hands are very important in our daily life. They are used for non-verbal communication and sensory feedback, but are also important to perform both fine (e.g. picking up paperclips) and gross (e.g. lifting heavy boxes) motor tasks. Decline of hand function in older adults as a result of age-related loss of muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) and/or age-related diseases such as stroke, rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, is a common problem worldwide. The decline in hand function, in particular grip strength, often results in increased difficulties in performing activities of daily living (ADL), such as carrying heavy objects, doing housework, (un)dressing, preparing food and eating.
New developments, based on the concept of wearable soft-robotic devices, make it possible to support impaired hand function during the performance of daily activities and intensive task-specific training. The ironHand and HandinMind systems are examples of such novel wearable soft-robotic systems that have been developed in the ironHand and HandinMind projects. Both systems are developed to provide grip support during a wide range of daily activities. The ironHand system consists of a 3-finger wearable soft-robotic glove, tailored to older adults with a variety of physical age-related hand function limitations. The HandinMind system consists of a 5-finger wearable soft-robotic glove, dedicated towards application in stroke. In both cases, the wearable soft-robotic system could be connected to a computer with custom software to train specific aspects of hand function in a motivating game-like environment with multiple levels of difficulty. By adding the game environment, an assistive device is transformed into a dedicated training device.
The aim of the current thesis is to define user requirements, to investigate feasibility and to evaluate the direct and clinical effects of a wearable soft-robotic system that is developed to support impaired hand function of older adults and stroke patients in a wide range of daily activities and in exercise training at home.

via The wearable hand robot: supporting impaired hand function in activities of daily living and rehabilitation — University of Twente Research Information

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training for improving activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength after stroke

Abstract

Background

Electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training devices are used in rehabilitation, and may help to improve arm function after stroke.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training for improving activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength in people after stroke. We also assessed the acceptability and safety of the therapy.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group’s Trials Register (last searched January 2018), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2018, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to January 2018), Embase (1980 to January 2018), CINAHL (1982 to January 2018), AMED (1985 to January 2018), SPORTDiscus (1949 to January 2018), PEDro (searched February 2018), Compendex (1972 to January 2018), and Inspec (1969 to January 2018). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, searched trials and research registers, checked reference lists, and contacted trialists, experts, and researchers in our field, as well as manufacturers of commercial devices.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials comparing electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training for recovery of arm function with other rehabilitation or placebo interventions, or no treatment, for people after stroke.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality and risk of bias, used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of the body of evidence, and extracted data. We contacted trialists for additional information. We analysed the results as standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous variables and risk differences (RDs) for dichotomous variables.

Main results

We included 45 trials (involving 1619 participants) in this update of our review. Electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training improved activities of daily living scores (SMD 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09 to 0.52, P = 0.0005; I² = 59%; 24 studies, 957 participants, high‐quality evidence), arm function (SMD 0.32, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.46, P < 0.0001, I² = 36%, 41 studies, 1452 participants, high‐quality evidence), and arm muscle strength (SMD 0.46, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.77, P = 0.003, I² = 76%, 23 studies, 826 participants, high‐quality evidence). Electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training did not increase the risk of participant dropout (RD 0.00, 95% CI ‐0.02 to 0.02, P = 0.93, I² = 0%, 45 studies, 1619 participants, high‐quality evidence), and adverse events were rare.

Authors’ conclusions

People who receive electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training after stroke might improve their activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength. However, the results must be interpreted with caution although the quality of the evidence was high, because there were variations between the trials in: the intensity, duration, and amount of training; type of treatment; participant characteristics; and measurements used.

Plain language summary

Electromechanical‐assisted training for improving arm function and disability after stroke

Review question

To assess the effects of electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training for improving arm function in people who have had a stroke.

Background

More than two‐thirds of people who have had a stroke have difficulties with reduced arm function, which can restrict a person’s ability to perform everyday activities, reduce productivity, limit social activities, and lead to economic burden. Electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training uses specialised machines to assist rehabilitation in supporting shoulder, elbow, or hand movements. However, the role of electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training for improving arm function after stroke is unclear.

Study characteristics

We identified 45 trials (involving 1619 participants) up to January 2018 and included them in our review. Twenty‐four different electromechanical devices were described in the trials, which compared electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training with a variety of other interventions. Participants were between 21 to 80 years of age, the duration of the trials ranged from two to 12 weeks, the size of the trials was between eight and 127 participants, and the primary outcome (activities of daily living: the most important target variable measured) differed between the included trials.

Key results

Electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training improved activities of daily living in people after stroke, and function and muscle strength of the affected arm. As adverse events, such as injuries and pain, were seldom described, these devices can be applied as a rehabilitation tool, but we still do not know when or how often they should be used.

Quality of the evidence

The quality of the evidence was high.

 

via Electromechanical and robot‐assisted arm training for improving activities of daily living, arm function, and arm muscle strength after stroke – Mehrholz, J – 2018 | Cochrane Library

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract + References] A Wearable Hand Neuroprosthesis for Hand Rehabilitation After Stroke: Preliminary Results of the RETRAINER S2 Randomized Controlled Trial – Conference paper

Abstract

Stroke is the main cause of permanent and complex long-term disability in adults. RETRAINER S2 is a system able to recover and support person’s ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL) in early stage after stroke. The system is based on exercises for hand and wrist performed using Neuro Muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES). This work describes the preliminary results of a multi-center Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) aimed at evaluating effectiveness of the system. The preliminary results were calculated on 18 patients who completed the protocol. Data is promising, the RETRANER S2 system seems to be a good tool for stroke rehabilitation. Data confirms also a general good usability of the system.

via A Wearable Hand Neuroprosthesis for Hand Rehabilitation After Stroke: Preliminary Results of the RETRAINER S2 Randomized Controlled Trial | SpringerLink

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Eye Movements Interfere With Limb Motor Control in Stroke Survivors

Background. Humans use voluntary eye movements to actively gather visual information during many activities of daily living, such as driving, walking, and preparing meals. Most stroke survivors have difficulties performing these functional motor tasks, and we recently demonstrated that stroke survivors who require many saccades (rapid eye movements) to plan reaching movements exhibit poor motor performance. However, the nature of this relationship remains unclear.

Objective. Here we investigate if saccades interfere with speed and smoothness of reaching movements in stroke survivors, and if excessive saccades are associated with difficulties performing functional tasks.

Methods. We used a robotic device and eye tracking to examine reaching and saccades in stroke survivors and age-matched controls who performed the Trail Making Test, a visuomotor task that uses organized patterns of saccades to plan reaching movements. We also used the Stroke Impact Scale to examine difficulties performing functional tasks.

Results. Compared with controls, stroke survivors made many saccades during ongoing reaching movements, and most of these saccades closely preceded transient decreases in reaching speed. We also found that the number of saccades that stroke survivors made during ongoing reaching movements was strongly associated with slower reaching speed, decreased reaching smoothness, and greater difficulty performing functional tasks.

Conclusions. Our findings indicate that poststroke interference between eye and limb movements may contribute to difficulties performing functional tasks. This suggests that interventions aimed at treating impaired organization of eye movements may improve functional recovery after stroke.

  

via Eye Movements Interfere With Limb Motor Control in Stroke Survivors – Tarkeshwar Singh, Christopher M. Perry, Stacy L. Fritz, Julius Fridriksson, Troy M. Herter, 2018

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: