Posts Tagged Adherence

[Abstract] Adherence to a Long-Term Physical Activity and Exercise Program After Stroke Applied in a Randomized Controlled Trial

Abstract

Background: Persistent physical activity is important to maintain motor function across all stages after stroke.
Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate adherence to an 18-month physical activity and exercise program.
Design: The design was a prospective, longitudinal study including participants who had had a stroke randomly allocated to the intervention arm of a randomized controlled trial.
Methods: The intervention consisted of individualized monthly coaching by a physical therapist who motivated participants to adhere to 30 minutes of daily physical activity and 45 minutes of weekly exercise over an 18-month period. The primary outcome was the combination of participants’ self-reported training diaries and adherence, as reported by the physical therapists. Mixed-effect models were used to analyze change in adherence over time. Intensity levels, measured by the Borg scale, were a secondary outcome.
Results: In total, 186 informed, consenting participants who had had mild-to-moderate stroke were included 3 months after stroke onset. Mean age was 71.7 years (SD = 11.9). Thirty-four (18.3%) participants withdrew and 9 (4.8%) died during follow-up. Adherence to physical activity and exercise each month ranged from 51.2% to 73.1%, and from 63.5% to 79.7%, respectively. Adherence to physical activity increased by 2.6% per month (odds ratio = 1.026, 95% CI = 1.014–1.037). Most of the exercise was performed at moderate-to-high intensity levels, ranging from scores of 12 to 16 on the Borg scale, with an increase of 0.018 points each month (95% CI = 0.011–0.024).
Limitations: Limitations included missing information about adherence for participants with missing data and reasons for dropout.
Conclusions: Participants with mild and moderate impairments after stroke who received individualized regular coaching established and maintained moderate-to-good adherence to daily physical activity and weekly exercise over time.

 

via Adherence to a Long-Term Physical Activity and Exercise Program After Stroke Applied in a Randomized Controlled Trial | Physical Therapy | Oxford Academic

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[ARTICLE] Adherence to Guidelines in Adult Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Living Systematic Review – Full Text

Abstract

Guidelines aim to improve the quality of medical care and reduce treatment variation. The extent to which guidelines are adhered to in the field of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is unknown. The objectives of this systematic review were to (1) quantify adherence to guidelines in adult patients with TBI, (2) examine factors influencing adherence, and (3) study associations of adherence to clinical guidelines and outcome. We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central, PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and grey literature in October 2014. We included studies of evidence-based (inter)national guidelines that examined the acute treatment of adult patients with TBI. Methodological quality was assessed using the Research Triangle Institute item bank and Quality in Prognostic Studies Risk of Bias Assessment Instrument. Twenty-two retrospective and prospective observational cohort studies, reported in 25 publications, were included, describing adherence to 13 guideline recommendations. Guideline adherence varied considerably between studies (range 18–100%) and was higher in guideline recommendations based on strong evidence compared with those based on lower evidence, and lower in recommendations of relatively more invasive procedures such as craniotomy. A number of patient-related factors, including age, Glasgow Coma Scale, and intracranial pathology, were associated with greater guideline adherence. Guideline adherence to Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines seemed to be associated with lower mortality. Guideline adherence in TBI is suboptimal, and wide variation exists between studies. Guideline adherence may be improved through the development of strong evidence for guidelines. Further research specifying hospital and management characteristics that explain variation in guideline adherence is warranted.

Introduction

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health concern affecting approximately 150–300 per 100,000 persons annually in Europe.1 The World Health Organization has predicted that TBI will be one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide by the year 2020.2

The care for patients with TBI is often complex and multidisciplinary. Guidelines, protocols, and care pathways have been developed to improve quality of care, to reduce variation in practice, and to ensure that evidence-based care is optimally implemented.3

A 2013 systematic review4 found that the use of protocols in the management of severe TBI in the intensive care unit (ICU) led to improved patient outcomes. The findings, however, were based on observational studies that did not report on adherence rates. Without an understanding of adherence rates, the improved outcomes stated in the review cannot be directly attributed to the use of protocols.

Guideline adherence can be defined as the proportion of patients treated according to a guideline recommendation, which often represents evidence-based or best practice care. Previous studies have found that guideline adherence in medicine is generally low5–7 and varies widely across centers,7,8 medical condition,9 types of guideline,10,11 and time period.8,10 As a result, many patients do not receive evidence-based care, while others receive unnecessary care that may even be harmful.5To date, no systematic review of the literature about guideline adherence in TBI has been conducted.

The aim of this systematic review was to provide a comprehensive overview of professionals’ adherence to guidelines in adult patients with TBI. The objectives were threefold:

  • 1. To quantify adherence to guidelines in adult patients with TBI.

  • 2. To explore factors influencing adherence to TBI guidelines in those studies reporting on adherence.

  • 3. To examine the association between adherence to guidelines and outcome in patients with TBI in those studies reporting on adherence.

Continue —> Adherence to Guidelines in Adult Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Living Systematic Review | Journal of Neurotrauma

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[WEB SITE] Medication Adherence Key to Epilepsy Treatment

Medication Adherence Key to Epilepsy Treatment

In assessing the effectiveness of prescribed medication there is a strong emphasis on the ability of the patient to adhere to the regime recommended by the clinician. For individuals with epilepsy, adherence to medication is crucial in preventing or minimizing seizures and their cumulative impact on everyday life. Non-adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can result in breakthrough seizures many months or years after a previous episode and can have serious repercussions on an individual’s perceived quality of life. Reasons for non-adherence are complex and multilayered. Patients can accidentally fail to adhere through forgetfulness, misunderstanding, or uncertainty about clinician’s recommendations, or intentionally due to their own expectations of treatment, side-effects, and lifestyle choice.

Adherence in epilepsy

Adherence is acting in accordance with advice, recommendations or instruction. Ways that adherence can be optimized;
1.  Educating individuals and their families and caregivers in understanding of their condition and the rationale of treatment, reducing the stigma associated with the conditions.

2.  Using simple medication regimes.

3.  Positive relationships between healthcare professionals, the individual with epilepsy and their family and /or caregivers.

4.  Other measures are; manual telephones follow up, home visits, special reminders, regular appointments/ refill reminders.

While failing to adhere to treatment plans can adversely affect individuals with any general medical condition, Non- adherence to anti-epileptic drugs results to increased risk of status epilepticus (prolonged seizures) resulting into brain damage, SUDEP, risk of injuries, increase rates of admission to hospital due prolonged seizures. The consequences of not taking medication can be more immediate with epilepsy.

Epilepsy as a chronic condition relies heavily on adherence to medical advice in order to maximize an individual’s quality of life by controlling seizures more effectively while avoiding unwanted side-effects. Treatment of those diagnosed with epilepsy the vast majorities are treated with AEDs and approximately 70% can become seizure-free once the most effective regime is followed.
Monotherapy is viewed as the initial and preferential option for treating epilepsy, the choice of drug depending on seizure type and effectiveness of the drug balanced against possible side-effects. It is difficult to find estimates of how many people are on monotherapy or polytherapy at any one point in time.
However, in one of the cases I encountered that of Sarafina Muthoni from Banana, Kiambu County, she was diagnosed with Epilepsy at a very young age in her primary school days. With no history of such a condition in her family, it got everybody thinking what could have gone wrong with their lovely daughter. After days of trying to figure out, the family had to adapt to reality of their daughter living with Epilepsy. She was lucky to have very supportive parents ready to see her through the long journey of treating the condition. The motivation and support from her loved ones to access medication improved her status by far as she continued to adhere to the prescribed treatment. Unfortunately, the support didn’t last long and the burden of continuing with treatment squarely relied on her. This adversely contributed to the beginning of non-adherence to medication for lack of funds to buy drugs. Not only were finances a challenge but also finding a good hospital to comply was a problem.
Muthoni had to live with the sad reality of pain every time she experienced a seizure. Pain which she clearly knew with access to medication the situation could by far be controlled. At the very worse of her situation she found help. Cheshire Disability Services Kenya (CDSK) a Non-Governmental Organization in Kenya whose objective is to empower an inclusive society of persons with disability and develop their full potential to lead a quality life, in partnership with Kenya Association of People with Epilepsy (KAWE) came for Muthonis’ rescue.
Under CDSK’s program to help Epilepsy patients’ access medication and ensure compliance, Muthoni benefited and today she leads a life full of potential and energy as she explores her skills as a beauty and hair stylist.
As we celebrate International Epilepsy Day on Feb 12th 2018, themed on “Life is beautiful”, Muthoni’s story is a highlight of what beauty is all about. Hers’ is just but one of the many inspiring stories to celebrate during this season of Epilepsy Awareness.

Managing Adherence

Adherence to medication regardless of medical condition remains an important problem in treatment. Factors that have been discussed here – side-effects, drug regime, family support, impact on everyday life, relationship with the clinician – are unlikely to be the only predictors of adherence. While adherence to treatment within the context of epilepsy has been the focus of this review, these factors can equally be applied to various chronic conditions.
Assessment of adherence should be a routine part of management of epilepsy. Further recognition and support should be given to patients who have poor seizure control since they are more likely to be more anxious and have unhelpful illness and treatment beliefs.
Finally, patients may be fully aware of the importance of taking AED medication and the benefits gained by altering their lifestyle choices in order to prevent seizures, but will make a decision about the degree to which they follow advice. Patients only have a small amount of time in contact with the clinician in their “patient role”, after which they return to the practicalities of their everyday routine where their adherence fluctuates based on how they feel their medication affects their quality of life.
Strategies to manage adherence originate from different perspectives. While the medical model may advocate less complex drug regimes, the use of measured pill containers, and minimization of side-effects, the psychosocial model analyzes non-adherence in terms of patient attitudes to medication, stigma, family and peer influences, and ability to manage self care. Neither model can adequately improve adherence independently. Perhaps the best approach is to offer a “menu” of adherence-enhancing strategies. However, what is increasingly clear from both models is that total adherence is an unrealistic goal. The emphasis has shifted away from total adherence towards a compromise with both patient and clinician involved in a joint process of treatment negotiation and decision-making in order to achieve the best outcome for the individual.

Source: Evewoman

via Medication Adherence Key to Epilepsy Treatment – EpilepsyU

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[ARTICLE] Adherence to Guidelines in Adult Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Living Systematic Review – Full Text HTML/PDF

ABSTRACT

Guidelines aim to improve the quality of medical care and reduce treatment variation. The extent to which guidelines are adhered to in the field of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is unknown. The objectives of this systematic review were to (1) quantify adherence to guidelines in adult patients with TBI, (2) examine factors influencing adherence, and (3) study associations of adherence to clinical guidelines and outcome. We searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central, PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and grey literature in October 2014. We included studies of evidence-based (inter)national guidelines that examined the acute treatment of adult patients with TBI. Methodological quality was assessed using the Research Triangle Institute item bank and Quality in Prognostic Studies Risk of Bias Assessment Instrument. Twenty-two retrospective and prospective observational cohort studies, reported in 25 publications, were included, describing adherence to 13 guideline recommendations. Guideline adherence varied considerably between studies (range 18–100%) and was higher in guideline recommendations based on strong evidence compared with those based on lower evidence, and lower in recommendations of relatively more invasive procedures such as craniotomy. A number of patient-related factors, including age, Glasgow Coma Scale, and intracranial pathology, were associated with greater guideline adherence. Guideline adherence to Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines seemed to be associated with lower mortality. Guideline adherence in TBI is suboptimal, and wide variation exists between studies. Guideline adherence may be improved through the development of strong evidence for guidelines. Further research specifying hospital and management characteristics that explain variation in guideline adherence is warranted.

 

Introduction

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health concern affecting approximately 150–300 per 100,000 persons annually in Europe.1 The World Health Organization has predicted that TBI will be one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide by the year 2020.2

The care for patients with TBI is often complex and multidisciplinary. Guidelines, protocols, and care pathways have been developed to improve quality of care, to reduce variation in practice, and to ensure that evidence-based care is optimally implemented.3

A 2013 systematic review4 found that the use of protocols in the management of severe TBI in the intensive care unit (ICU) led to improved patient outcomes. The findings, however, were based on observational studies that did not report on adherence rates. Without an understanding of adherence rates, the improved outcomes stated in the review cannot be directly attributed to the use of protocols.

Guideline adherence can be defined as the proportion of patients treated according to a guideline recommendation, which often represents evidence-based or best practice care. Previous studies have found that guideline adherence in medicine is generally low5–7 and varies widely across centers,7,8 medical condition,9 types of guideline,10,11 and time period.8,10 As a result, many patients do not receive evidence-based care, while others receive unnecessary care that may even be harmful.5 To date, no systematic review of the literature about guideline adherence in TBI has been conducted.

The aim of this systematic review was to provide a comprehensive overview of professionals’ adherence to guidelines in adult patients with TBI. The objectives were threefold:

  • 1. To quantify adherence to guidelines in adult patients with TBI.

  • 2. To explore factors influencing adherence to TBI guidelines in those studies reporting on adherence.

  • 3. To examine the association between adherence to guidelines and outcome in patients with TBI in those studies reporting on adherence.

[…]

Continue —>  Adherence to Guidelines in Adult Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Living Systematic Review

FIG. 1. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses flowchart of the selection process. Reasons for exclusion full text: Study design: the study was no prospective or retrospective cohort study, randomized controlled trial, clinical trial, cross-sectional study, or time series; Guideline: the study did not describe a guideline, the guideline was local or not evidence-based, the guideline was not implemented or disseminated before the study period; Adherence: the study did not measure adherence per patient, adherence was self-reported; traumatic brain injury (TBI): the study was not about patients with TBI; Setting: the study was not conducted during the hospital and pre-hospital setting; Language: the study was not published in English; Solely about children: the study did not include adults. Adapted from: Moher D, Liberati A, Tetzlaff J, Altman DG, The PRISMA Group (2009). Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: The PRISMA Statement. PLoS Med 6: e1000097.

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[Abstract] Effectiveness of interventions to improve therapy adherence in people with upper limb conditions: A systematic review

Abstract

Study Design

Systematic review.

Introduction

Patient adherence to orthosis wear and/or prescribed exercises improves functional outcome after acute injury and can prevent deformities, contractures, and reinjury of tissues. This is the first systematic review to review the evidence of the effectiveness of interventions to improve treatment adherence in children and adults with acute or chronic upper limb injuries or conditions.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose of this study is to establish the effectiveness of interventions to improve hand therapy adherence in people with upper limb conditions and to report on outcome measures used when reporting adherence.

Methods

A literature search of MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), CENTRAL (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO), and EmCare (OVID) (from inception to March 2017) was undertaken. Studies were selected if they met the following inclusion criteria: clinical trials; in adults or children with any injury or condition affecting the upper limb including acute trauma and injury; chronic and acquired musculoskeletal conditions; and neurological conditions. Two independent assessors rated the study quality and risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for assessing the risk of bias.

Results

Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Study quality ranged from 3 to 6 out of 7 points on the Cochrane risk of bias tool. There were 4 categories of intervention for improving adherence: orthosis/cast material/design; orthosis wear schedule; patient education mode for home exercise programs; and behavioral approaches. Due to heterogeneity of condition acuity, interventions, and outcomes reported, it was not possible to pool the results from all studies. Therefore, a narrative best evidence synthesis was undertaken. There is weak evidence from a very small number of trials that orthosis/cast material has no influence on treatment adherence in acute or chronic conditions and mode of patient education (audio-visual vs written) has no effect in acute conditions. There is low-to-moderate quality of evidence in support of behavioral interventions for achieving treatment adherence in chronic rheumatoid arthritis.

Conclusion

Behavioral approaches that encourage self-efficacy are likely to be useful in achieving treatment adherence in populations with chronic upper limb conditions. There is insufficient evidence for other interventions aimed at improving adherence in acute upper limb injuries and conditions.

via Effectiveness of interventions to improve therapy adherence in people with upper limb conditions: A systematic review – Journal of Hand Therapy

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