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[WEB SITE] Caregiving Issues and Strategies

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Whether you’re trying to work out a care plan for your aging parents with  your siblings, or searching online for the latest app to assist you with your ill spouse’s medication reminders, FCA’s resources on Caregiving Issues and Strategies offer a wealth of information. This section provides you with practical care strategies, stress relief, available community resources, how to handle family issues, as well as hands-on care.

Source: Family Caregiver Alliance

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[Cochrane Review] Activity monitors for increasing physical activity in adult stroke survivors – Full Text

Cochrane library logo

Abstract

This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows:

To summarise the available evidence regarding the effectiveness of commercially available wearable devices and smart phone applications for increasing physical activity levels for people with stroke.

Background

Description of the condition

Between 1990 and 2010 absolute numbers of people living with stroke increased by 84% worldwide, and stroke is now the third leading cause of disability globally (Feigin 2014). As such, the disease burden of stroke is substantial. It has been estimated that 91% of the burden of stroke is attributable to modifiable risk factors such as smoking, poor diet, and low levels of physical activity (Feigin 2016). A low level of physical activity (less than four hours per week) is the second highest population-attributable risk factor for stroke, second only to hypertension (O’Donnell 2016). The promotion of physical activity, which has been defined as body movement produced by skeletal muscles resulting in energy expenditure (Caspersen 1985), is therefore an important health intervention for people with stroke.

The association between health and physical activity is well established. Prolonged, unbroken bouts of sitting is a distinct health risk independent of time engaged in regular exercise (Healy 2008). There is evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that high sitting time and low levels of physical activity contribute to poor glycaemic control (Owen 2010). Three systematic reviews and meta-analyses of observational studies have confirmed that, after adjusting for other demographic and behavioural risk factors, physical activity is inversely associated with all-cause mortality in men and women (Nocon 2008; Löllgen 2009; Woodcock 2011). Yet despite this knowledge, populations worldwide are becoming more sedentary, and physical inactivity has been labelled a global pandemic (Kohl 2012).

In addition to overcoming the sedentary lifestyles and habits prevalent in many modern societies, people with stroke have additional barriers to physical activity such as weakness, sensory dysfunction, reduced balance, and fatigue (Billinger 2014). Directly after a stroke, people should be admitted to hospital for co-ordinated care and commencement of rehabilitation (SUTC 2013). Early rehabilitation after stroke is frequently focused on the recovery of physical independence (Pollock 2014). Recovery after stroke is enhanced by active practice of specific tasks, and greater improvements are seen when people with stroke spend more time in active practice (Veerbeek 2014). Yet findings from research conducted around the world indicate that people in the first few weeks and months after stroke are physically inactive in hospital settings with around 80% of the day spent inactive (sitting or lying) (West 2012). These high levels of inactivity are concerning because recovering the ability to walk independently is an important goal of people with stroke. The reported paucity of standing and walking practice in the early phase after stroke potentially limits the opportunities of people with stroke to optimise functional recovery, particularly for standing and walking goals. Further, physical inactivity may lead to an increased risk of hospital-acquired complications, such as pressure ulcers, pneumonia, and cardiac compromise (Lindgren 2004).

Physical activity levels of people with stroke remain lower than their age-matched counterparts even when they return to living in the community (English 2016). Community-dwelling stroke survivors spend the vast majority of their waking time sitting down (English 2014). Promisingly, early research suggests that increasing physical activity in people with stroke is feasible, and that an increase in physical activity levels after stroke may have a positive impact on fatigue, mood, community participation, and quality of life (QoL) (Graven 2011; Duncan 2015).

Continue —> Activity monitors for increasing physical activity in adult stroke survivors – Lynch – 2017 – The Cochrane Library – Wiley Online Library

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[WEB SITE] Exercise Prescription Software – Physical Therapy Web

Any tool that can help people be more active and involved in their own rehabilitation is worthwhile. An increase in patient compliance can be achieved by making exercise programs easier to adhere to. Clear descriptions of how to perform exercises correctly is also critical to the success of any exercise program. Here is a list of software applications that allow physical therapists to create specific exercise programs for their patients. The list is not complete. If you know of a product that should be included or if you’d like to have your exercise prescription software reviewed, please let us know.

exercise prescription software - diagram

By Udrekeli [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

Arena Health Systems: Creators of Phys-X software

“Phys-X Advanced includes over 900 of the most often prescribed range of motion, stabilization and strengthening exercises (categories listed below) and includes Full Color Photographs for most exercises! Each exercise includes an illustration and specific easy to follow instructions that allow on-the-fly modification. The exercises can even be printed with Spanish instructions.”

BPM Rx: Exercise prescription for health and fitness professionals

“Whether you’re a personal trainer or physical therapist, exercise prescription is your life. BPM Rx is the ultimate PT Software that allows you to craft stunning exercise handouts that will inspire like never before! Try it out-the first week is free!”

BioEx Systems Inc.: Easy to use home exercise database

“Exercise, Fitness Assessment, Nutrition and Management software for Physical Therapists, Personal Trainers, Dietitians, Nutritionists and other professionals. Windows based software.”

Exercise Prescriber: Provide home exercises and information advice

“…an essential clinical tool for health professionals who routinely provide home exercises and information advice for their clients.”

Exercise Pro Live : Personalized Video and Printed Exercise Programs for Rehabilitation and Fitness

“…designed by physical therapists and other fitness professionals to provide video exercise programs with clear exercise instructions, proper exercise form and improved compliance and communication between health professionals and their clients.”

HEP2go.com: HEP for rehab pro’s

“For rehabilitation professionals such as physical therapists, occupational therapists, athletic trainers, etc. to create home exercise programs for patients and or clients.”

i-HEP.com: iHomeExerciseProgram

“Innovative Video + Web-based Platform = Better HEP Management & Better Patient Education

Mavenlive: Intelligent exercise prescription, customizable images, and documentation (free-trial available)

“Using Mavenlive will benefit you not only from a clinical standpoint, but it will help you improve relationships with your patients and your referral sources. Mavenlive clients tell us that physicians love getting professional correspondence. “

myclinicspace: High quality image and video exercises for patient rehabilitation

“myclinicspace is an online exercise prescription package for health professionals.”

MyPhysioRehab: A global community of therapists helping to speed your recovery (free-demo available)

“MyPhysioRehab allows you as a health professional to provide your patients with an injury profile and a rehabilitation programme to aid rapid recovery.”

PacPacs+: Online Rehabilitation Exercise and Client Management

“Manage your patient aftercare. Prescribe rehabilitation routines with multi-angle videos. Track consultation history and make notes for future sessions.”

Patient Care HEP: MedBridge

“Patient Care HEP is the fast, easy, comprehensive, and engaging home exercise program for rehabilitation professionals.”

Physiotec: Exercise and patient education database software

“Physiotec offers a health and fitness software with exercise programs for physiotherapy, rehabilitation and therapeutic exercises and distributes it across Canada, United-States (USA) and United-Kingdoms.”

PTX – PhysioTherapy eXercises: Create custom programs or choose ready made programs

“A free tool to create exercise programs for people with injuries and disabilities”

PhysioTools Software: Comprehensive and easy to use exercise software

“Exercise software for health and fitness professionals to print and email over 15,000 exercises for rehabilitation, physiotherapy, sports and education”

Physioview: Features professionally produced photographs, audio, video and text

“Physioview redefines the home exercise program from the fundamental to highly customized creation of rehabilitation exercise protocols. “

Physitrack: A mobile phone exclusively for practitioners

“Provides Physical Therapists with the ability to prescribe exercises, send messages to their patients”

The Rehab Lab: Online Exercise Prescription Software

“The Rehab Lab is an online exercise prescription software application that enables physiotherapists to create customised rehabilitation programmes for clients and patients.”

Simple Therapy: video exercise therapy that matches your needs, when and where you want it

“SimpleTherapy® offers more than 20 video-based exercise therapy programs designed by doctors.”

SimpleSet Pro: Advanced Exercise Prescription Software

“SimpleSet Pro is the ultimate online tool for professional exercise program design. With SimpleSet Pro you can create comprehensive exercise programs for your clients, and email or print them in minutes!”

SHAPES: Spatially and Human Aware Performance Evaluation System.

“SHAPES is an interactive, assistive technology (using the Microsoft Xbox Kinect) that enhances exercise routines.”

TheraVid: Connect. Discover. Recover.

“Use our expanding database of HD exercise videos and unique online interface to build better client relationships today. Free while in beta.”

WebExercises: Exercise Prescription Made Easy™

“WebExercises® will promote more frequent and proper form of all prescribed rehabilitation and corrective exercises – resulting in improved recovery and stronger happier patients and clients.”

wellpepper: gives your health a kick

“Wellpepper for iPad and iPhone enables healthcare professionals to prescribe physical therapy exercises and encourages people to complete exercises at home to help speed recovery”

Source: Exercise Prescription Software – Physical Therapy Web

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[WEB SITE] Bioness Receives FDA Clearance for the L300 Go™ System.

VALENCIA, Calif., Feb. 07, 2017 /PRNewswire/

Bioness, Inc., the leading provider of cutting-edge, clinically supported rehabilitation therapies, today announced that it received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the L300 Go System. The L300 Go builds upon the global success of the company’s NESS L300® Foot Drop System and NESS L300 Plus® System with numerous advancements, including the introduction of 3D motion detection of gait events, multi-channel stimulation and a mobile iOS application to track user activity.

Gait movement disorders, such as foot drop and knee instability, are often associated with an upper motor neuron disease such as stroke and multiple sclerosis as well as injuries to the brain and spinal cord. Individuals with an impaired gait have less control over their lower extremity muscles and are at an increased risk for falls. The L300 Go is the first functional electrical stimulation (FES) system to offer 3D motion detection of gait events and muscle activation using data from a 3-axis gyroscope and accelerometer.  Patient movement is monitored in all three kinematic planes and stimulation is deployed precisely when needed during the gait cycle.  An adaptive, learning algorithm accommodates changes in gait dynamics, and a high speed processor that deploys stimulation within 10 milliseconds of detecting a valid gait event.  This rapid, reliable response is critical and supports user confidence.

The new myBioness™ mobile iOS application allows home users of the system to track activity, set personal goals and review their progress over time using dynamic reporting capabilities. The app has been designed to keep users engaged in the rehabilitation process and motivated to meet their recovery goals.

Multi-channel stimulation is an additional noteworthy L300 Go feature that allows clinicians to precisely control the amount of dorsiflexion and inversion/eversion the system provides. Using a new, proprietary electrode, medial and lateral stimulation can be adjusted independently. This more efficient fitting process saves valuable time and facilitates more productive therapy sessions.

“The healthcare system is being challenged to objectively document and improve functional capabilities. To help meet these demands, clinicians are turning to technologies that speed up rehabilitation timelines and provide a personalized recovery plan,” said Todd Cushman, President and CEO of Bioness. “Technological innovations including 3D motion detection and multi-channel stimulation work together to improve treatment efficiency and promote patient mobility. At Bioness, we are focused on improving the lives of patients through technology and are proud to add the L300 Go into our growing portfolio of products.”

The L300 Go System was cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on January 27, 2017.  The system is indicated to provide ankle dorsiflexion in adult and pediatric individuals with foot drop and/or assist knee flexion or extension in adult individuals with muscle weakness related to upper motor neuron disease/injury (e.g., stroke, damage to pathways to the spinal cord). The L300 Go System electrically stimulates muscles in the affected leg to provide ankle dorsiflexion of the foot and/or knee flexion or extension; thus, it also may improve the individual’s gait.

Bioness will begin commercial release of the L300 Go in the spring of 2017. Initially, the system will only be available to healthcare professionals for clinic use. Home user availability is targeted for the later part of 2017. Current users of the L300 Foot Drop System and L300 Plus System will be eligible for a Customer Loyalty Upgrade Program which is designed to make the new technology more accessible for users in the clinic and community.

About Bioness, Inc.
Bioness is the leading provider of innovative technologies helping people regain mobility and independence. Bioness solutions include implantable and external neuromodulation systems, robotic systems and software based therapy programs providing functional and therapeutic benefits for individuals affected by pain, central nervous system disorders and orthopedic injuries. Currently, Bioness offers six medical devices within its commercial portfolio which are distributed and sold on five continents and in over 25 countries worldwide. Our technologies have been implemented in the most prestigious and well-respected institutions around the globe with approximately 90% of the top rehabilitation hospitals in the United States currently using one or more Bioness solution.  Bioness has a singular focus on aiding large, undeserved customer groups with innovative, evidence-based solutions and we will continue to develop and make commercially available new products that address the growing and changing needs of our customers. Individual results vary. Consult with a qualified physician to determine if this product is right for you. Contraindications, adverse reactions and precautions are available online at www.bioness.com.

Source: Bioness Receives FDA Clearance for the L300 Go™ System

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[Project Report] “Active on Wheels” INF2260/4060 H2016 – Full Text PDF

1. Introduction

The “Active on Wheels” project is done in collaboration with Matthijs Wouda at Sunnaas Sykehus HF, and our project statement is simply put to design a useful, inspiring, and motivating interface for the “Active on Wheels” app. The app combines a smartphone, fitness-armband, and a heart rate monitor belt to provide accurate energy expenditure (how many calories you use) for wheelchair users. The app exists today with a functional, but bare bones design (See Fig 1), which our task is to change. The goal of the app is to enable exercise measuring and tracking for disabled people outside of hospital settings, in order to motivate and support them to exercise and work out.

Full Text PDF

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[WEB SITE] RAPAEL Smart Glove Receives CES 2017 Innovation Award – Rehab Managment

The RAPAEL Smart Glove, a wearable device from NEOFECT, Burlingame, Calif, offers at-home game-based hand therapy for stroke patients who cannot visit a clinic due to economic or geographic reasons.

Simply wear the glove, connect to the “RAPAEL” app, and play the rehabilitation games.

The Smart Glove—a CES 2017 Innovation Awards Honoree for the hospital edition—leads the patient through games that stimulate daily activities, in one or two 30-minute sessions per day.

Built-in sensors capture the patient’s movement and positioning data, and transfer it via Bluetooth to a tablet, where it is analyzed. This analysis enables the games’ difficulty levels to be adjusted and the patient’s exercise schedule to be customized.

Training movements include forearm supination/pronation, wrist flexion/extension, wrist radial/ulnar deviation, and finger flexion/extension, per the company’s website.

[Source: NEOFECT]

Source: RAPAEL Smart Glove Receives CES 2017 Innovation Award – Rehab Managment

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[WEB SITE] “Selfie Pay”: Making Online Payments Via Selfies – Assistive Technology Blog

Selfies are all the rage these days. Using this popular technique of taking photos, Mastercard is trialing a new method of payment that may be helpful to people with disabilities. The company’s new mobile app, called “Identity Check Mobile” (and popularly known as Selfie Pay) allows shoppers to pay for their purchases online by taking a selfie.

This is how it works: The app, when first downloaded, takes a photo of the user, and stores a digitized photo of their face on Mastercard’s servers. When that user is shopping online on their computer, and is ready to pay, they get a notification on their phone to verify the purchase amount. Once they verify it (by simply tapping on the amount), the next screen asks them to take a selfie. The selfie is then matched with the digitized photo of that person’s face, and if there is a match, the purchase is approved. The app also asks the person to blink to ensure that a human is actually taking the selfie, and someone is not just holding a photo of the person in front of the phone camera.

This can be beneficial for people with not very good motor skills, amputees, people with vision impairment or anyone who would want to speed up the checkout process by not typing on the keyboard.

This app is already available in several countries in Europe, and Mastercard says it should be available across the globe starting sometime next year.

Source: “Selfie Pay”: Making Online Payments Via Selfies – Assistive Technology Blog

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[ARTICLE] Democratizing Neurorehabilitation: How Accessible are Low-Cost Mobile-Gaming Technologies for Self-Rehabilitation of Arm Disability in Stroke? – Full Text HTML

Abstract

Motor-training software on tablets or smartphones (Apps) offer a low-cost, widely-available solution to supplement arm physiotherapy after stroke. We assessed the proportions of hemiplegic stroke patients who, with their plegic hand, could meaningfully engage with mobile-gaming devices using a range of standard control-methods, as well as by using a novel wireless grip-controller, adapted for neurodisability. We screened all newly-diagnosed hemiplegic stroke patients presenting to a stroke centre over 6 months. Subjects were compared on their ability to control a tablet or smartphone cursor using: finger-swipe, tap, joystick, screen-tilt, and an adapted handgrip. Cursor control was graded as: no movement (0); less than full-range movement (1); full-range movement (2); directed movement (3). In total, we screened 345 patients, of which 87 satisfied recruitment criteria and completed testing. The commonest reason for exclusion was cognitive impairment. Using conventional controls, the proportion of patients able to direct cursor movement was 38–48%; and to move it full-range was 55–67% (controller comparison: p>0.1). By comparison, handgrip enabled directed control in 75%, and full-range movement in 93% (controller comparison: p<0.001). This difference between controllers was most apparent amongst severely-disabled subjects, with 0% achieving directed or full-range control with conventional controls, compared to 58% and 83% achieving these two levels of movement, respectively, with handgrip. In conclusion, hand, or arm, training Apps played on conventional mobile devices are likely to be accessible only to mildly-disabled stroke patients. Technological adaptations such as grip-control can enable more severely affected subjects to engage with self-training software.

Introduction

The most important intervention shown to improve physical function after stroke is repetitive, task-directed exercises, supervised by a physiotherapist, with higher intensity leading to faster and greater recovery. In practice, access to physiotherapy is significantly limited by resource availability . For example, 55% of UK stroke in-patients receive less than half the recommended physiotherapy time of 45 minutes per day.

One solution to inadequate physiotherapy is robotic technology, that enables patients to self-practice, with mechanical assistance, via interaction with adapted computer games. While a range of rehabilitation robotics have been marketed over the last decade, and shown to be efficacious, they are not widely used due to factors such as high-cost (typically, $10,000–100,000), cumbersome size, and restriction to patients with high baseline performance, and who have access to specialist rehabilitation centres.

An alternative approach to self-rehabilitation, are medical applications (Apps), or gaming software, run on mobile media devices e.g. tablets or smartphones. Because such devices are low-cost ($200–500), and ubiquitous, they have the potential to democratize computerized-physiotherapy, especially in under-resourced settings, e.g. chronically-disabled in the community. Furthermore, their portability enables home use, while their employment of motivational gaming strategies can potentiate high-intensity motor practice. Accordingly, increasing numbers of motor-training Apps for mobile devices have been commercialised in recent years, and clinical trials are under way. However, since these devices are designed for able-person use, it is questionable as to how well disabled people can access them, and engage meaningfully and repeatedly with rehabilitation software.

This study assesses the degree of motor interaction that can be achieved by hemiplegic stroke patients using four types of conventional hand-control methods (finger swipe, tap, joystick and tilt) for mobile devices. An adapted controller of the same mobile devices, whose materials cost ~$100, was evaluated alongside. Since the latter interface exploits the fact that handgrip is relatively spared in stroke hemiplegia, and is sensitive to subtle forces, we expected that this would increase the range of arm-disability severities able to achieve meaningful computer-game control. In order to assess motor control, with minimal cognitive confounding (given that many softwares also have cognitive demands), we used a simple 1-dimensional motor assessment for all controller types.

Continue —> PLOS ONE: Democratizing Neurorehabilitation: How Accessible are Low-Cost Mobile-Gaming Technologies for Self-Rehabilitation of Arm Disability in Stroke?

Fig 1. Control methods and devices trialled. Conventional control mechanisms were trialled using standard tablet and smartphone (A, B). Subjects were required only to move a cursor along a single vertical path, full-range, and then to an indicated vertical level (they were not tested on playing the underlying game). B shows software used for assessing swipe, with varying cursor size. There was no improvement in accessibility using a larger cursor. The novel control mechanism (C) is a wireless grip-force sensor that detects both finger-flexion and extension movements, the latter assisted by a fingerstrap holding the device within a partially-extended hand. Control software for C entailed moving a circle in a vertical plane towards a target star. Cursor and target stimuli dimensions and contrast are similar between all methods.

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[WEB SITE] Neuroplasticity: 10 Things Stroke Survivors Need to Know

Neuroplasticity is a big word getting a lot of buzz. It means the brain (“neuro”) can change (“plastic”). We hear a lot about it in stroke and brain injury rehab because it gives hope to survivors that their brains can heal, adapt, and rewire after they have been damaged. We also hear the word in advertisements for new treatments or programs. What exactly is neuroplasticity, and how does it work?

Intuitively, we know that we get better at the things we practice, and we are shaped by our experiences. Therapy for a damaged brain is essentially no different. The best therapies exploit how neuroplasticity works by using repetitive positive experiences to forge and strengthen pathways in the brain. To better understand how this works, we look to the research published by Kleim & Jones that outlines the 10 principles of experience-dependent neuroplasticity.

Neuroplasticity - What it Means for Stroke Survivors

1) Use it or lose it

The skills we don’t practice often get weaker.

2) Use it and improve it

The skills we practice get better.

3) Specificity

We must skillfully practice the exact tasks we want to improve.

4) Repetition matters

We must do a task over and over again once we’ve got it right to actually change the brain.

5) Intensity matters

More repetitions in a shorter time are necessary for creating new connections.

6) Time matters

Neuroplasticity is a process rather than a single event, with windows of opportunity opening for different skills at different times. In rehabilitation, starting earlier is usually better than starting later.

Recent research shows that even 5+ years post-stroke, people with aphasia made significant progress in language skills using Language Therapy daily.

7) Salience matters

To change the brain, the skill we’re practicing must have some meaning, relevance, or importance to us.

8) Age matters

Younger brains tend to change faster than older brains, but improvement is possible at any age.

9) Transference

Practicing one skill can result in improvement of a related skill.

10) Interference

Learning an “easier way” of doing something (i.e. a bad habit or compensation) may make it harder to learn the proper way.

 

Whether you’re learning a new skill or re-learning a lost one, it’s clear we must practice the thing we want to get better at. Unfortunately, many stroke survivors, recovering but not yet ready to return to work, sit at home alone between therapy sessions. They turn to TV to pass the time, despite being willing to do the exercises they need to improve their skills. Fortunately, there are new technologies (such as an app that helps you practice talking or a video game that guides you through meaningful movements) that can help provide intense, meaningful, and skilled stimulation that will change their brains for the better. Understanding how neuroplasticity works can help you evaluate which methods can truly help you reach your goal.

Regrettably, there are some people who are exploiting the term neuroplasticity to give brain injury survivors false hope that they can get better with unproven treatments that require little to no effort. If the therapy does not have you directly practicing the skill it claims to improve, please be cautious. There are no quick-fixes (remember: intensity and repetition matter), and there is no one-size-fits-all solution (remember: specificity and relevance matter). Anyone who tells you otherwise, using brain-brandingneuro-marketing, or brain-training terminology while charging you for a service or product, is banking on you not knowing the difference. But now you do.

 

Further Reading on Neuroplasticity:

 


Tactus Therapy apps are an affordable and accessible way to get some of the mental stimulation needed for recovery. You can personalize Language Therapy, Answering Therapy, and Conversation Therapy with your own questions or photos, helping you use repetition & personal relevance to your advantage.

Source: Neuroplasticity: 10 Things Stroke Survivors Need to Know

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[Blog post] 10 DISASTER APPS THAT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE

SEPTEMBER 5, 2016
In 2016, there is a great need to explore faster and more effective methods of activating relief efforts. These apps can help keep you and your family safe in the event of an emergency. If you, or someone you know, has a disability which will make escaping a disaster situation not easy, it is imperative to plan ahead and give yourself enough time.

text description of infographic is below

 

Text description:

  1. Disaster Alert
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Disaster Alert by the Pacific Disaster Centre provides mobile access to multi-hazard monitoring of and early warning for “active hazards” aroudn the globe.

  1. First Aid by American Red Cross
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Features simple step-by-step instructions that guide you through everyday first aid scenarios.

  1. Global Emergency Overview
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

The app allows you to quickly browse through the different countries included in the overview while providing easy access to more in-depth sectoral analysis and baseline information.

  1. Humanitarian Kiosk
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

The Humanitarian Kiosk created by the United Nations provides a range of up-to-the-minute humanitarian related information from emergencies around the world.

  1. Real Time Warning
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Real Time Warning offers alerts about disasters around the world. Users select an event to see its location, damage, severity, and rumble radius on a world map.

  1. Earthquake Alert!
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Earthquake Alert offers information about earthquakes with a magnitude of 1.0 and up in the US and magnitude of 4.0 and up from anywhere else in the world.

  1. SirenGPS
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

With SIrenGPS you can contact the emergency services with the tap of the button and it instantly gives them your exact location and personal details.

  1. Red Panic Button
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

By simply pushing the red panic buton, this app will send your GPS coordinates and a link to Google Maps by SMS or email to previously specified contact list.

  1. Life360
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Life 360 allows you and your family to set up a private network, then with a click of a button, you can let yourr family where you are and if you’re safe.

  1. Guardly
    Available on: iOS, Android
    Price: Free

Guardly enables you to receive emergency and operational alerts from your company or company’s security team in the event of an emergency at work.

Emergency Checklist

In the event of an emergency:

  1. Assess your personal safety before taking action.
  2. Call emergency services and tell them:
    a. The location of the emergency including nearby landmarks.
    b. The telephone number from where the call is being made.
    c. What happened.
    d. How many people require assistance.
    e. Condition of the people.
    f. What assistance is being given.
    g. Stay on the line until the operator says it’s okay to hang up.
  3. Try to stay calm until the emergency services arrive.

References:

News.abs-cbn.com/ Lifestyle/ 07/ 17/ 15/ 7-mobile-apps-can-help-during-natural-disasters
Heavy.com/tech/2015/09/top-5-best-free-disaster-emergency-red-cross-apps-for-iphone-android thenextweb.com/Insider/2015/11/17/7—essential-personal-safety-apps-for-emergency-situations/#gref
iphonelife.com/content/top-iphone-features-and-apps-can-save-your-life
Au.reachout.com/what-to-do-in-an-emergency

Source: Nature’s Water Ltd.

Source: 10-disaster-apps-that-could-save-your-life-infographic – Assistive Technology Blog

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