Posts Tagged App

[WEB PAGE] Stay Mobile with the New myRehabMedical App

Stay Mobile with the New myRehabMedical App

 

Rehab Medical, Indianapolis, launches myRehabMedical. Available on both Android and Apple devices, the app provides customers with instant access to order updates, service requests, contact information, live chats, and product tutorials.

“Rehab Medical has a mission to improve lives, and one way we intend to accomplish this is through innovation and the use of technology,” President Kevin Gearheart says, in a media release. “This app provides our patients with a number of tools and options that will make the patient experience second to none.”

Additional app features such as live chats, virtual service support, and mobility-focused content designed to connect those within the complex rehab community will be introduced in the coming months. The app is also HIPPA compliant, requiring multi-factor identification to protect customer information.

“This organization has made a strong commitment to be our industry leader in technology, and this app is proof of that commitment,” Chief Technology Officer Kenny Hicks comments. “We’ve implemented a robust road map for improving our technology. Soon we will be launching additional features to this app, as well as adding new technology to help both our patients and partners.”

Related Content:
Rehab Medical Acquires Mobility Specialists
Rehab Medical Rises to No 12 Among Indiana’s Top 25
Rehab Medical Named One of Indiana’s Best Places to Work

From the initial launch, customers will have a complete listing of all their orders along with a brief overview of the order once they complete registration. A comprehensive library of training videos will also provide tips and tricks on how to get the most out of their equipment.

The myRehabMedical app is now available for download in both the Google Play Store and the Apple Store, as well as online via the web.

For more information, visit Rehab Medical.

[Source: Rehab Medical]

via Stay Mobile with the New myRehabMedical App – Rehab Managment

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[WEB PAGE] Get ‘Connect’-ed to Rehab the Hands and Arms Post-Stroke

Get ‘Connect’-ed to Rehab the Hands and Arms Post-Stroke

Neofect announces the launch of its new app, Neofect Connect, developed to deliver customized exercises, educational tools, and motivation to guide patients at home as they work to regain the use of their hands and arms after experiencing a stroke.

The app provides reminders, daily exercises, and educational resources to help patients recovering from stroke stay engaged with their rehabilitation. For current users of Neofect’s Smart Rehabilitation Solutions — including the Neofect Smart Glove, the Neofect Smart Board, and the Neofect Smart Kids — the app also serves as a library to store and access activity summaries and progress reports, according to Neofect in a media release.

“Neofect Connect is designed to support, inspire, and empower stroke survivors through rehabilitation at home. Rehabilitation is a time-consuming and tedious process, and it can be hard for patients to stay motivated, especially without the benefit of in-person therapy. Connect is meant to help patients establish regular rehabilitation practices and reinforce lifelong behavioral changes that are essential to their health and wellness.”

— Scott Kim, co-founder and CEO of Neofect USA

The app first walks users through a detailed stroke evaluation to determine the affected side and user mobility, then encourages them to set goals that serve as the foundation for recommended exercises and educational resources.

With a user’s needs and ability level in mind, Connect then suggests daily activities — such as using a toothbrush with the affected hand, writing a name five times, or trying to operate scissors without assistance — best suited for their recovery. Most importantly, Connect sends users daily reminders and push notifications so that patients never miss an exercise and maintain an active rehabilitation schedule, the release continues.

“Consistency is critical to recovery,” Kim adds. “Connect keeps daily exercises and rehabilitation top of mind, so stroke survivors don’t miss a session and derail their progress.”

Connect also delivers educational materials and videos developed by Neofect’s licensed therapists to prepare patients for what to expect during rehabilitation. It offers advice, inspirational messages, and tips to establish better lifestyle habits, boost mental health, and improve a user’s overall well-being. Additionally, a diary function enables users to log personal notes about their activities and achievements.

Connect is now available on the Apple App Store and on Google Play.

[Source(s): Neofect, Business Wire]

via Get ‘Connect’-ed to Rehab the Hands and Arms Post-Stroke – Rehab Managment

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[WEB PAGE] Physiopedia App Update – Physiospot


Posted on by Scott Buxton

The awesome Physiopedia App has been update to include some exciting new features.

New and exciting features have been added to the Physiopedia App making it even easier to access CPD on the go. New additions will transform your commute by using the narrate feature which makes the app read the content to you! Additionally sharing pages is easier with the additon of a share button  and QR codes.

The Physiopedia app is free and brings all of Physiopedia’s articles, which have been beautifully optimised for mobile, to your fingertips.  The app is free however there is an optional, but worthwhile, low cost monthly subscription which allows you to add unlimited articles to your own personal list of favorites within the app. These bookmarked articles are then just one tap away and are also downloaded for offline viewing. Ideal for the busy clinical environment where time is short and internet access cannot be guaranteed.

Some of the great free features include ‘Article of the Day’ where there is a new exciting high quality page for you to read daily. Perfect for a small dose of CPD or great for that inspirational spark when on the go or when waiting for patients to arrive.

The Premium Update

The new updates are for premium members and include some seriously useful additions such as:

  • Play icon – narrates article text – great for using your commute as an opportunity to get some quick CPD in
  • Share icon – reveals iOS share panel to share article URL by social media, email etc
  • QR code icon – reveals a QR code that shares the article URL that can be scanned by other device cameras
  • Settings page accessed by the app menu – Allows the selection of the narration voice used and narration speed.

Don’t just take our word for how good the app is! Below are some reviews of the app written by the physiotherapy community which explain why it is a must have for physiotherapists working in any setting.

Reviews

What an amazing app. All the information you could ever want at your fingertips and more. Each topic has links so if you want to you can investigate further. This is the best source of physio information I have come across in my quest for knowledge and answers!

I recognise this as an incredibly powerful resource. This changes how in a Low-and-Middle-Income-Countries (LAMIC) we can access current, best-practice knowledge. This allows the development of the profession globally in a consistent and reliable way… I can see this will become a regular go-to resource. Great job Physiopedia!

Clinically useful and based in science! I have been waiting for an App like this for a long time. I work both in a clinic and as a researcher and Physiopedia meets my needs in both worlds. Easy to use, cutting-edge scientific information and connects me to other health care providers around the world. Great App, highly recommend it!

OMG this is amazing, everything I need. Thanks for the app very very helpful….

The app is really easy to download from both the App Store and Google Play in fact just follow the links to the relevant store below. Once you’ve downloaded the app and had a look around don’t forget to like and leave a review.

Get it on Google Play
Download on the App Store

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[COVID-19] NEW APP ATTEMPTS TO DETECT SIGNS OF COVID-19 USING VOICE ANALYSIS

YOU CAN TRY IT OUT RIGHT HERE.
BY JON CHRISTIAN

A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and other institutions have released an early version of an app that they claim can determine whether you might have COVID-19, just by analyzing your voice.

“I’ve seen a lot of competition for the cheapest, fastest diagnosis you can have,” said Benjamin Striner, a Carnegie Mellon graduate student who worked on the project, in an interview with Futurism. “And there are some pretty good ones that are actually really cheap and pretty accurate, but nothing’s ever going to be as cheap and as easy as speaking into a phone.”

That’s a provocative claim in the face of the global coronavirus outbreak, and particularly the widespread shortages of testing kits. But Striner believes that the team’s algorithm, even though it’s still highly experimental, could be a valuable tool in tracking the spread of the virus, especially as the team continues to refine its accuracy by collecting more data.

You can use the COVID Voice Detector now to analyze your own voice for signs of infection, though it comes with a hefty disclaimer that it’s “not a diagnostic system,” not approved by the FDA or CDC, and shouldn’t be used as a substitute for a medical test or examination.

The researchers behind the project emphasize that the app is a work in progress.

“What we are attempting to do is to develop a voice-based solution, which, based on preliminary experiments and prior expertise, we believe is possible. The app’s results are preliminary and untested,” said Bhiksha Raj, a professor at Carnegie Mellon who also worked on the project. “The score the app currently shows is an indicator of how much the signatures in your voice match those of other COVID patients whose voices we have tested. This is not medical advice. The primary objective of our effort/website at this point of time is to collect large numbers of voice recordings that we could use to refine the algorithm into something we — and the medical community — are confident about.”

“If the app is to be put out as a public service, it, and our results, will have to be verified by medical professionals, and attested by an agency such as the CDC,” Raj added. “Until that happens, its still very much an experimental and untrustworthy system. I urge people not to make healthcare decisions based on the scores we give you. You could be endangering yourself and those around you.”

And at the end of the day, it’s unlikely the app will ever be as accurate as a laboratory test.

“In terms of diagnostics, of course, it’s never going to be as as accurate as taking a swab and putting it on some agar and waiting for it to grow,” said Striner, who has been working around the clock to prepare the app for release. “But in terms of very easily monitoring a ton of people daily, weekly, whatever, monitoring on a very large scale, it gives you a way to handle and track health outbreaks.”

If you have a smartphone or a computer with a microphone, using the app is simple. Users are prompted to cough several times and record a number of vowel sounds, as well as reciting the alphabet. Then it provides a score, expressed as a download-style progress bar, representing how likely the algorithm believes it is that the user has COVID-19.

Also working on the project is Rita Singh, a professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon who for years has been creating algorithms that identify micro-signatures in the human voice that she believes reveal psychological, physiological, and even medical data about an individual subject.

“The cough of a COVID patient is very distinctive,” Singh said. “It affects the lungs so badly that breathing patterns and several other vital parameters are affected, and those are likely to have very strong signatures in voice.”

A challenge for Singh and Striner’s team of ten Carnegie Mellon researchers — who have all been working on the app from home, the campus is shut down due to the pandemic — has been gathering enough audio from confirmed COVID-19 patients, in order to train the algorithm.

To gather that data, the team reached out to colleagues around the world. Those colleagues didn’t just help them gather audio from COVID-19 patients, but also patients with other viruses, so that they could teach the algorithm to spot the differences. They even pored over news videos to find interviews with patients, and add those to the dataset as well.

“You have samples of people that are healthy, you have samples of people that might just have the flu,” Striner said. “And you have all those different recordings of all the different types of coughs, like what are all the coughs that are out there? And then that allows you to kind of spot the differences.”

It’s difficult to quantify the current version of the app’s accuracy, and both Striner and Singh reiterated that its output shouldn’t be treated as medical advice.

“Its accuracy cannot be tested currently because we don’t have the verified test instances we need,” Singh said, adding that the more people who use the app — healthy or otherwise — the more data they will have to better train the algorithm. “If it comes from a healthy person, we then have examples of what ‘healthy’ sounds like. If it comes from a person who has some known respiratory condition, we then know what that condition sounds like. The system will use all that data as counterexamples, and for disambiguating COVID signatures from those of other confusing conditions.”

Ashwin Vasan, a professor at Columbia University Medical Center who was not involved in the Carnegie Mellon research, expressed reservations about releasing the app during a moment of global health crisis.

“Despite what could be a well-intentioned attempt by a bunch of engineers to help during this crisis, this is not exactly the messaging we want to be out there,” he cautioned. “That somehow there is a nifty new tool we can use to diagnose coronavirus, in absence of the things we really need much more of, actual test kits, serologic testing, PPE for frontline healthcare workers, and ventilators for critically ill patients.”

“Let’s keep the focus on that, especially when our leaders in Washington seem unable to meet those most basic needs,” he added. “Anything else is just a distraction.”

For their part, the Carnegie Mellon team says they’re grappling with the public health implications of the app. Striner said that they’ve consulted with colleagues in the medical research community, and that they carefully considered how to fine-tune the app’s sensitivity.

“We would probably side more towards having some false positives then false negatives, if that make sense,” Striner said. “If you give someone a false negative on COVID, then they walk around and get a bunch of people sick, versus a couple extra false positives, maybe some people get tests they don’t need.”

Editor’s note March 31: This story has been updated with additional remarks from Dr. Bhiksha Raj.

Source: https://futurism.com/neoscope/new-app-detects-covid19-voice

 

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[WEB SITE] Keep an Eye on Your Loved Ones at Home with ROSIE

By  | Jan 15, 2020

Keep an Eye on Your Loved Ones at Home with ROSIE

 

Forma SafeHome LLC announces the launch of its senior home monitoring service that aims to facilitate more prolonged in-home independence for aging-in-place seniors or the disabled.

The fall detection and health monitoring customization bundle features advanced technologies integrated into ROSIE SafeHome, an all-in-one, patent-pending app designed to provide alerts, notifications, and messages that show the user if there is any unusual activity.

The app, available for download on iTunes and Google Play, is accessible on smartphones and tablets to allow family members 24/7 access into the safety of their loved ones through the coordination of these technologies, according to the Sunrise, Fla-based company:

  • Non-intrusive fall and motion detectors
  • Kitchen and stove monitoring
  • Outdoor doorbell camera systems
  • Coming soon: medication protocol monitors and more smart home technology

“Our Rosie Home Fall detector, Rosie Home Stove/Oven monitor, and Rosie Home Doorbell Cam will give peace of mind knowing your independent family members are in a safe environment,” says Scott Daub, President, Forma SafeHome LLC, in a media release.

Rich Cohen, Forma SafeHome Advisory Board Member adds, “Through the blend of innovative and non-intrusive technology, the patent-pending app gives you real-time information about falls, safety, and life patterns via your iPhone or Android device. It is affordable and gives you peace of mind about your independent-living family members in ways never previously available.”

[Source(s): Forma SafeHome, PRWeb]

 

via Keep an Eye on Your Loved Ones at Home with ROSIE – Rehab Managment

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[WEB SITE] Neofect Debuts Smart Balance, Designed to Rehab the Lower Body by Playing Games – Rehab Managment

Neofect Debuts Smart Balance, Designed to Rehab the Lower Body by Playing Games

Neofect unveils Neofect Smart Balance, a lower-body rehabilitation device designed to help patients recovering from stroke, ambulatory injuries, and other lower body disabilities regain function in their legs via augmented reality.

Recognized as a 2020 CES Innovation Award honoree, Neofect Smart Balance features 16 rehabilitation games that emphasize core strength, restabilization, and balance, all with the goal of helping patients walk unassisted.

The rehab device features a 2.5-foot by 2.5-foot “Dance Dance Revolution”-esque board designed to evaluate a patient’s posture and gait, then track and analyze motions, providing feedback when it senses an imbalance. Optional handlebars provide additional stability as needed. As patients advance, Neofect Smart Balance games increase speed of movement and coordination as patients step on and off the pad, according to the company, US-based in San Francisco, in a media release.

“For the past decade we’ve focused on hand and upper arm rehabilitation, but we’ve always wanted to create more engaging and measurable therapy for patients who need to recover leg function — whether that’s relearning how to walk or regaining range of motion and confidence,” Scott Kim, co-founder and CEO of Neofect USA, says in the release.

“With Neofect Smart Balance, games like ‘Rock Band’ prompt users to move their feet, in this case to the beat of a song. Patients are physically and cognitively challenged and can also have fun while rehabilitating.”

Neofect Smart Balance is designed for use in healthcare clinics and at home, increasing accessibility of treatment for patients with limited mobility. It securely and remotely shares progress reports with therapists, so they can monitor and adjust patients’ recovery regimen as needed.

Neofect announces it is also showcasing Neofect Connect, a new coaching and companion app, at CES 2020. Designed as an extension of therapy in a clinical setting to support and inspire stroke survivors through recovery at home, Neofect Connect will recommend customized daily exercises and educational materials based on patient ability.

The app, which will be available for any stroke survivor regardless if they use Neofect’s solutions, will include a digital telehealth program where physical and occupational therapists will connect with users remotely to guide their rehabilitation.

Neofect Connect is available on the Apple App Store and on the Google Play Store for homeNeofect users and will be open to any stroke survivor in spring 2020, per the release.

[Source(s): Neofect, Business Wire]

 

via Neofect Debuts Smart Balance, Designed to Rehab the Lower Body by Playing Games – Rehab Managment

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[WEB SITE] Download The Physiopedia App Now! – Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy in the Spotlight

Download The Physiopedia App Now!

The ultimate reference tool for physiotherapists has arrived on IOS and Android!

You asked and we listened, the Physiopedia app is here and waiting for you to download this holiday season. The app is free and brings all of Physiopedia’s articles, which have been beautifully optimised for mobile, to your fingertips. Think of it as Physiopedia’s end of year gift to you.

The app is free however there is an optional, but worthwhile, low cost monthly subscription which allows you to add unlimited articles to your own personal list of favorites within the app. These bookmarked articles are then just one tap away and are also downloaded for offline viewing. Ideal for the busy clinical environment where time is short and internet access cannot be guaranteed.

One of the best free features of the app is Article of the Day where each day there is a new exciting high quality page for you to read. Perfect for a small dose of CPD or great for that inspirational spark when on the go or when waiting for patients to arrive.

Don’t just take our word for how good the app is! Below are some reviews of the app written by the physiotherapy community which explain why it is a must have for physiotherapists working in any setting.

Reviews

What an amazing app. All the information you could ever want at your fingertips and more. Each topic has links so if you want to you can investigate further. This is the best source of physio information I have come across in my quest for knowledge and answers!

I recognise this as an incredibly powerful resource. This changes how in a Low-and-Middle-Income-Countries (LAMIC) we can access current, best-practice knowledge. This allows the development of the profession globally in a consistent and reliable way… I can see this will become a regular go-to resource. Great job Physiopedia!

Clinically useful and based in science! I have been waiting for an App like this for a long time. I work both in a clinic and as a researcher and Physiopedia meets my needs in both worlds. Easy to use, cutting-edge scientific information and connects me to other health care providers around the world. Great App, highly recommend it!

The app is really easy to download from both the App Store and Google Play in fact just follow the links to the relevant store below. Once you’ve downloaded the app and had a look around don’t forget to like and leave a review.

via Download The Physiopedia App Now! – Physiospot – Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy in the Spotlight

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[Abstract] The New Smartphone Application for Wrist Rehabilitation.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
The rehabilitation after wrist surgery is extremely important. An instructed therapy in hospital is widely practiced. However, a dependent aging society and rush life style in younger generation have precluded patients to access to the frequent formal therapy. With the advancement in telecommunication technology, we have invented an application for smartphone for home-based wrist motion rehabilitation.

METHODS:
Twenty participants were included in four-week wrist motion rehabilitation programme after wrist surgery. Participants were instructed to use the application by physical therapist and informed details of home-based wrist rehabilitation. The feasibility of application was evaluated by satisfaction level in various aspects and the adherence to the therapy was monitored by function provided in the application. The degrees of motion were compared at the end of prescribed programme.

RESULTS:
Patient satisfaction was consistently high in every aspects. Also, the adherence to the therapy was high (90.42%). Ranges of motion significantly gained in every plane of wrist motion ([Formula: see text]).

CONCLUSIONS:
This novel smartphone application seems to be a promising and convenient alternative for patients who need to gain wrist motion without formal rehabilitation in the hospital. Adherence to the therapy is also easily traced with this application.

Fig. 1. (A, B) Strip of thermoplastic material was tailored to fit with patient palm for holding mobile phone during therapy session.

Fig. 1. (A, B) Strip of thermoplastic material was tailored to fit with patient palm for holding mobile phone during therapy session. 

via The New Smartphone Application for Wrist Rehabilitation. – PubMed – NCBI

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[WEB SITE] What is neurohacking and can it actually rewire your brain?

Marc Bordons / Stocksy

What is neurohacking and can it actually rewire your brain?

Although at one point, “hack” referred to a creative solution to a tech problem, the term can apply to pretty much anything now. There are kitchen hacks, productivity hacks, personal finance hacks. Brain hacks, or neurohacks, are among the buzziest, though, thanks largely to the Silicon Valley techies who often swear by them as a way to boost their cognitive function, focus, and creativity. Mic asked a neuroscientist to explain neurohacking, which neurohacking methods are especially promising, which are mostly hype, and how to make neurohacking work for you.

First things first: Neurohacking, is a broad umbrella term that encompasses anything that involves “manipulating brain function or structure to improve one’s experience of the world,” says neuroscientist Don Vaughn of Santa Clara University and the University of California, Los Angeles. Like the other myriad forms of hacking, neurohacking uses an engineering approach, treating the brain as a piece of hardware that can be systematically modified and upgraded.

Neurohacking techniques can fall under a number of categories — here are a few of the most relevant ones, as well as the thinking behind them.

Brain stimulation

This involves applying an electric or magnetic field to certain regions of the brain in non-neurotypical people to make their activity more closely resemble that seen in a neurotypical brain. In 2008, the Food and Drug Administration approved transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) — a noninvasive form of brain stimulation which delivers magnetic pulses to the brain in a noninvasive manner — for major depression. Since then, the FDA has also approved TMS for pain associated with migraines with auras, as well as obsessive-compulsive disorder. Established brain stimulation techniques (such as TMS or electroconvulsive therapy) performed by an expert provider, such as a psychiatrist or neuroscientist, are generally safe, Vaughn says.

Neurofeedback

This one involves using a device that measures brain activity, such as an electroencephalogram (EEG) or a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine. People with neuropsychological disorders receive feedback on their own brain activity — often in the form of images or sound — and focus on trying to make it more closely resemble the brain activity in a healthy person, Vaughn says. This could happen through changing their thought patterns, Vaughn says. Another possibility is that the feedback itself, or the person’s thoughts about the feedback, may somehow lead to a change in their brain’s wiring.

Reducing cognitive load

This means minimizing how much apps, devices, and other tech compete for your attention. Doing so can sharpen and sustain your focus, or what Vaughn refers to as your attention quotient (AQ). To boost his AQ, Vaughn listens to brown noise, which he likens to “white noise, but deeper.” (Think the low rush of a waterfall versus pure static.) He also chews gum, which he says provides an outlet for his restless “monkey mind” while still allowing him to focus on the task at hand.

Reducing cognitive load can also deepen your connection with others. Vaughn uses Voicea, an app based on an AI assistant that takes and store notes of meetings, whether over the phone or in-person, allowing him to focus solely on the conversation, not on recording it. “If we can quell those disruptions that occur because of the way work is done these days, it will allow us to focus and be more empathic with each other,” he says.

Monitoring sleep

Tracking your sleep patterns and adjusting them accordingly. Every night, you go through around five or so stages of sleep, each one deeper than the last. “People are less groggy and make fewer errors when they wake up in a lighter stage of sleep,” Vaughn says. He uses Sleep Cycle, an app that tracks your sleep patterns based on your movements in bed to rouse you during your lightest sleep stage.

Andrey Popov / Shutterstock

Microdosing

Microdosing is the routinely consumption of teensy doses of psychedelics like LSD, ecstasy, or magic mushrooms. Many who practice microdosing follow the regimen recommended by James Fadiman, psychologist and author of The Psychedelic Explorer’s Guide: Safe, Therapeutic, and Sacred Journeys: a twentieth to a tenth of a regular dose, once every three days for about a month. While a regular dose may make you trip, a microdose has subtler effects, with some users reporting, for instance, enhanced energy and focus, per The Cut.

Nootropics

These are OTC supplements or drugs taken to enhance cognitive function. They range from everyday caffeine and vitamin B12 (B12 deficiency has been associated with cognitive decline) to prescription drugs like Ritalin and Adderall, used to treat ADHD and narcolepsy, as well as Provigil (modafinil), used to treat extreme drowsiness resulting from narcolepsy and other sleep disorder. (All three of these drugs promote wakefulness.) The science behind nootropic supplements in particular remains rather murky, though.

Does neurohacking work, though?

Vaughn finds microdosing, neurostimulation, and neurofeedback especially promising for neuropsychological disorders. Although studies suggest that larger doses of psychedelics could help with disorders such as PTSD and treatment-resistant major depression, there are few studies on microdosing psychedelics. “The little science that has been done…is mixed—perhaps slightly positive,” Vaughn says. “Microdosing is promising mainly because of anecdotal evidence.” Meanwhile, neurostimulation can be used noninvasively in some cases, and TMS has already received FDA approval for a handful of conditions. Neurofeedback is not only non-invasive, but offers immediate feedback, and studies suggest it could be effective for PTSD and addiction.

But it’s important to note that just because these methods could positively alter brain function in people with neuropsychological disorders, that “doesn’t mean it’s going to take a normal system and make it superhuman,” Vaughn says. “I think there are lots of small hacks to be done that could add up to something big,” rather than huge hacks that can vastly upgrade cognitive function, a la Limitless. Thanks to millions of years of evolution, the human brain is already pretty damn optimized. “I just don’t know how much more we can tweak it to make it better,” Vaughn says.

As far as enhancements for neurotypical brains, he says that “you’ll probably see a much greater improvement” from removing distractions in your environment to reduce cognitive load than say, increasing your B12 intake — which brings us to an important disclaimer about nootropic supplements in particular. As with all supplements, they aren’t FDA-regulated, meaning that companies that sell them don’t need to provide evidence that they’re safe or effective. Vaughn recommends trying nootropics that research has shown to be safe and effective, like B12 or caffeine.

How can I start neurohacking?

As tempting as it is, adopting every neurohack under the sun is “not the answer,” Vaughn says. Remember, everyone is different. While your best friend may gush about how much her mood has improved since she began microdosing shrooms, your brain might not respond to microdosing—or maybe taking psychedelics just doesn’t align with your ethics.

Start by exploring different neurohacks, and of course, be skeptical of any product that makes outrageous claims. Since neurofeedback isn’t a common medical treatment, talk to your doctor about enrolling in academic studies on neurofeedback, or companies that offer it if you’re interested, Vaughn says. You should also talk to your doctor if you want to try brain stimulation. A doctor can prescribe you Adderall, Ritalin, or Provigil but only for their indicated medical uses, not for cognitive enhancement.

Ultimately, neurohacks are tools, Vaughn says. “You have to find the one that works for you.” If anything, taking this DIY approach to improving your brain function will leave you feeling empowered, a benefit that probably rivals anything a supplement or sleep tracking app could offer.

 

via What is neurohacking and can it actually rewire your brain?

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[WEB PAGE] Pioneering rehabilitation app helps physios track patients’ progress and prescribe exercise videos

Ascenti PhysioNow image

Independent physiotherapy provider Ascenti has launched PhysioNow, a new exercise and rehabilitation app which aims to revolutionise the way musculoskeletal injury is treated by providing patients with physiotherapy services at the touch of a button.

PhysioNow supports users throughout their journey to recovery by providing 24/7 access to expert advice through digital triage, virtual consultations and tailored exercise programmes from approved Ascenti clinicians. Users can book appointments directly through the app and try out exercises in their own home, with access to guided videos that can be downloaded and viewed at any time.

A fully integrated digital care solution, the app will benefit patients by allowing them to track their own progress and compliance with their rehabilitation programme, improve their knowledge and empowerment through education and self-management advice, and increase their confidence knowing they are following the correct exercise prescription.

PhysioNow is fully integrated with Ascenti’s bespoke patient workflow system. This means that physiotherapists can prescribe video exercises, track patient progress and adjust according to real-time patient feedback, all within the same system that supports them in all other aspects of their daily role (from writing treatment notes to accessing clinical dairies).

For patients, this means a digitally enhanced and hassle-free journey, whether their treatment is face-to-face or virtual.

Currently, a third of all musculoskeletal referrals Ascenti receives come from patients suffering with back pain. PhysioNow will enable enhanced clinical outcomes and more cost-effective care, including for common conditions such as back pain.

A beta test version of the app launched earlier this year and has been used by 1,400 patients, with 93 percent of users endorsing the app and saying that they would recommend it to friends and family.

The PhysioNow app is available to all Ascenti patients and will be accessible when they book their first physio appointment.

Additionally, the app will be available to download from the App Store for Apple iOS users and the Play Store for android devices. There will also be a web-based service that people can use at physionow.ascenti.co.uk

Stephanie Dobrikova, CEO at Ascenti, commented: “The launch of PhysioNow makes Ascenti the market leader when it comes to the provision of digitally-enabled physiotherapy and musculoskeletal (MSK) services.

“In today’s healthcare industry we are seeing more and more technological advances that are transforming patient care – improving the experience of clinicians and service users alike.

“Our Digital Health Strategy has placed us at the forefront of these advancements and our mission is to keep bringing the very best digitally enabled services to our patients and partners.”

Ascenti is a provider of physiotherapy and associated services in the UK and is a trusted partner to more than 20 NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups and 400 private businesses across the UK.

The company has over 300 highly trained clinicians delivering upwards of 52,000 treatment sessions every month.

via Pioneering rehabilitation app helps physios track patients’ progress and prescribe exercise videos – AT Today

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