Posts Tagged App

[WEB SITE] Keep an Eye on Your Loved Ones at Home with ROSIE

By  | Jan 15, 2020

Keep an Eye on Your Loved Ones at Home with ROSIE

 

Forma SafeHome LLC announces the launch of its senior home monitoring service that aims to facilitate more prolonged in-home independence for aging-in-place seniors or the disabled.

The fall detection and health monitoring customization bundle features advanced technologies integrated into ROSIE SafeHome, an all-in-one, patent-pending app designed to provide alerts, notifications, and messages that show the user if there is any unusual activity.

The app, available for download on iTunes and Google Play, is accessible on smartphones and tablets to allow family members 24/7 access into the safety of their loved ones through the coordination of these technologies, according to the Sunrise, Fla-based company:

  • Non-intrusive fall and motion detectors
  • Kitchen and stove monitoring
  • Outdoor doorbell camera systems
  • Coming soon: medication protocol monitors and more smart home technology

“Our Rosie Home Fall detector, Rosie Home Stove/Oven monitor, and Rosie Home Doorbell Cam will give peace of mind knowing your independent family members are in a safe environment,” says Scott Daub, President, Forma SafeHome LLC, in a media release.

Rich Cohen, Forma SafeHome Advisory Board Member adds, “Through the blend of innovative and non-intrusive technology, the patent-pending app gives you real-time information about falls, safety, and life patterns via your iPhone or Android device. It is affordable and gives you peace of mind about your independent-living family members in ways never previously available.”

[Source(s): Forma SafeHome, PRWeb]

 

via Keep an Eye on Your Loved Ones at Home with ROSIE – Rehab Managment

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Neofect Debuts Smart Balance, Designed to Rehab the Lower Body by Playing Games – Rehab Managment

Neofect Debuts Smart Balance, Designed to Rehab the Lower Body by Playing Games

Neofect unveils Neofect Smart Balance, a lower-body rehabilitation device designed to help patients recovering from stroke, ambulatory injuries, and other lower body disabilities regain function in their legs via augmented reality.

Recognized as a 2020 CES Innovation Award honoree, Neofect Smart Balance features 16 rehabilitation games that emphasize core strength, restabilization, and balance, all with the goal of helping patients walk unassisted.

The rehab device features a 2.5-foot by 2.5-foot “Dance Dance Revolution”-esque board designed to evaluate a patient’s posture and gait, then track and analyze motions, providing feedback when it senses an imbalance. Optional handlebars provide additional stability as needed. As patients advance, Neofect Smart Balance games increase speed of movement and coordination as patients step on and off the pad, according to the company, US-based in San Francisco, in a media release.

“For the past decade we’ve focused on hand and upper arm rehabilitation, but we’ve always wanted to create more engaging and measurable therapy for patients who need to recover leg function — whether that’s relearning how to walk or regaining range of motion and confidence,” Scott Kim, co-founder and CEO of Neofect USA, says in the release.

“With Neofect Smart Balance, games like ‘Rock Band’ prompt users to move their feet, in this case to the beat of a song. Patients are physically and cognitively challenged and can also have fun while rehabilitating.”

Neofect Smart Balance is designed for use in healthcare clinics and at home, increasing accessibility of treatment for patients with limited mobility. It securely and remotely shares progress reports with therapists, so they can monitor and adjust patients’ recovery regimen as needed.

Neofect announces it is also showcasing Neofect Connect, a new coaching and companion app, at CES 2020. Designed as an extension of therapy in a clinical setting to support and inspire stroke survivors through recovery at home, Neofect Connect will recommend customized daily exercises and educational materials based on patient ability.

The app, which will be available for any stroke survivor regardless if they use Neofect’s solutions, will include a digital telehealth program where physical and occupational therapists will connect with users remotely to guide their rehabilitation.

Neofect Connect is available on the Apple App Store and on the Google Play Store for homeNeofect users and will be open to any stroke survivor in spring 2020, per the release.

[Source(s): Neofect, Business Wire]

 

via Neofect Debuts Smart Balance, Designed to Rehab the Lower Body by Playing Games – Rehab Managment

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Download The Physiopedia App Now! – Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy in the Spotlight

Download The Physiopedia App Now!

The ultimate reference tool for physiotherapists has arrived on IOS and Android!

You asked and we listened, the Physiopedia app is here and waiting for you to download this holiday season. The app is free and brings all of Physiopedia’s articles, which have been beautifully optimised for mobile, to your fingertips. Think of it as Physiopedia’s end of year gift to you.

The app is free however there is an optional, but worthwhile, low cost monthly subscription which allows you to add unlimited articles to your own personal list of favorites within the app. These bookmarked articles are then just one tap away and are also downloaded for offline viewing. Ideal for the busy clinical environment where time is short and internet access cannot be guaranteed.

One of the best free features of the app is Article of the Day where each day there is a new exciting high quality page for you to read. Perfect for a small dose of CPD or great for that inspirational spark when on the go or when waiting for patients to arrive.

Don’t just take our word for how good the app is! Below are some reviews of the app written by the physiotherapy community which explain why it is a must have for physiotherapists working in any setting.

Reviews

What an amazing app. All the information you could ever want at your fingertips and more. Each topic has links so if you want to you can investigate further. This is the best source of physio information I have come across in my quest for knowledge and answers!

I recognise this as an incredibly powerful resource. This changes how in a Low-and-Middle-Income-Countries (LAMIC) we can access current, best-practice knowledge. This allows the development of the profession globally in a consistent and reliable way… I can see this will become a regular go-to resource. Great job Physiopedia!

Clinically useful and based in science! I have been waiting for an App like this for a long time. I work both in a clinic and as a researcher and Physiopedia meets my needs in both worlds. Easy to use, cutting-edge scientific information and connects me to other health care providers around the world. Great App, highly recommend it!

The app is really easy to download from both the App Store and Google Play in fact just follow the links to the relevant store below. Once you’ve downloaded the app and had a look around don’t forget to like and leave a review.

via Download The Physiopedia App Now! – Physiospot – Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy in the Spotlight

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] The New Smartphone Application for Wrist Rehabilitation.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
The rehabilitation after wrist surgery is extremely important. An instructed therapy in hospital is widely practiced. However, a dependent aging society and rush life style in younger generation have precluded patients to access to the frequent formal therapy. With the advancement in telecommunication technology, we have invented an application for smartphone for home-based wrist motion rehabilitation.

METHODS:
Twenty participants were included in four-week wrist motion rehabilitation programme after wrist surgery. Participants were instructed to use the application by physical therapist and informed details of home-based wrist rehabilitation. The feasibility of application was evaluated by satisfaction level in various aspects and the adherence to the therapy was monitored by function provided in the application. The degrees of motion were compared at the end of prescribed programme.

RESULTS:
Patient satisfaction was consistently high in every aspects. Also, the adherence to the therapy was high (90.42%). Ranges of motion significantly gained in every plane of wrist motion ([Formula: see text]).

CONCLUSIONS:
This novel smartphone application seems to be a promising and convenient alternative for patients who need to gain wrist motion without formal rehabilitation in the hospital. Adherence to the therapy is also easily traced with this application.

Fig. 1. (A, B) Strip of thermoplastic material was tailored to fit with patient palm for holding mobile phone during therapy session.

Fig. 1. (A, B) Strip of thermoplastic material was tailored to fit with patient palm for holding mobile phone during therapy session. 

via The New Smartphone Application for Wrist Rehabilitation. – PubMed – NCBI

, , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] What is neurohacking and can it actually rewire your brain?

Marc Bordons / Stocksy

What is neurohacking and can it actually rewire your brain?

Although at one point, “hack” referred to a creative solution to a tech problem, the term can apply to pretty much anything now. There are kitchen hacks, productivity hacks, personal finance hacks. Brain hacks, or neurohacks, are among the buzziest, though, thanks largely to the Silicon Valley techies who often swear by them as a way to boost their cognitive function, focus, and creativity. Mic asked a neuroscientist to explain neurohacking, which neurohacking methods are especially promising, which are mostly hype, and how to make neurohacking work for you.

First things first: Neurohacking, is a broad umbrella term that encompasses anything that involves “manipulating brain function or structure to improve one’s experience of the world,” says neuroscientist Don Vaughn of Santa Clara University and the University of California, Los Angeles. Like the other myriad forms of hacking, neurohacking uses an engineering approach, treating the brain as a piece of hardware that can be systematically modified and upgraded.

Neurohacking techniques can fall under a number of categories — here are a few of the most relevant ones, as well as the thinking behind them.

Brain stimulation

This involves applying an electric or magnetic field to certain regions of the brain in non-neurotypical people to make their activity more closely resemble that seen in a neurotypical brain. In 2008, the Food and Drug Administration approved transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) — a noninvasive form of brain stimulation which delivers magnetic pulses to the brain in a noninvasive manner — for major depression. Since then, the FDA has also approved TMS for pain associated with migraines with auras, as well as obsessive-compulsive disorder. Established brain stimulation techniques (such as TMS or electroconvulsive therapy) performed by an expert provider, such as a psychiatrist or neuroscientist, are generally safe, Vaughn says.

Neurofeedback

This one involves using a device that measures brain activity, such as an electroencephalogram (EEG) or a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine. People with neuropsychological disorders receive feedback on their own brain activity — often in the form of images or sound — and focus on trying to make it more closely resemble the brain activity in a healthy person, Vaughn says. This could happen through changing their thought patterns, Vaughn says. Another possibility is that the feedback itself, or the person’s thoughts about the feedback, may somehow lead to a change in their brain’s wiring.

Reducing cognitive load

This means minimizing how much apps, devices, and other tech compete for your attention. Doing so can sharpen and sustain your focus, or what Vaughn refers to as your attention quotient (AQ). To boost his AQ, Vaughn listens to brown noise, which he likens to “white noise, but deeper.” (Think the low rush of a waterfall versus pure static.) He also chews gum, which he says provides an outlet for his restless “monkey mind” while still allowing him to focus on the task at hand.

Reducing cognitive load can also deepen your connection with others. Vaughn uses Voicea, an app based on an AI assistant that takes and store notes of meetings, whether over the phone or in-person, allowing him to focus solely on the conversation, not on recording it. “If we can quell those disruptions that occur because of the way work is done these days, it will allow us to focus and be more empathic with each other,” he says.

Monitoring sleep

Tracking your sleep patterns and adjusting them accordingly. Every night, you go through around five or so stages of sleep, each one deeper than the last. “People are less groggy and make fewer errors when they wake up in a lighter stage of sleep,” Vaughn says. He uses Sleep Cycle, an app that tracks your sleep patterns based on your movements in bed to rouse you during your lightest sleep stage.

Andrey Popov / Shutterstock

Microdosing

Microdosing is the routinely consumption of teensy doses of psychedelics like LSD, ecstasy, or magic mushrooms. Many who practice microdosing follow the regimen recommended by James Fadiman, psychologist and author of The Psychedelic Explorer’s Guide: Safe, Therapeutic, and Sacred Journeys: a twentieth to a tenth of a regular dose, once every three days for about a month. While a regular dose may make you trip, a microdose has subtler effects, with some users reporting, for instance, enhanced energy and focus, per The Cut.

Nootropics

These are OTC supplements or drugs taken to enhance cognitive function. They range from everyday caffeine and vitamin B12 (B12 deficiency has been associated with cognitive decline) to prescription drugs like Ritalin and Adderall, used to treat ADHD and narcolepsy, as well as Provigil (modafinil), used to treat extreme drowsiness resulting from narcolepsy and other sleep disorder. (All three of these drugs promote wakefulness.) The science behind nootropic supplements in particular remains rather murky, though.

Does neurohacking work, though?

Vaughn finds microdosing, neurostimulation, and neurofeedback especially promising for neuropsychological disorders. Although studies suggest that larger doses of psychedelics could help with disorders such as PTSD and treatment-resistant major depression, there are few studies on microdosing psychedelics. “The little science that has been done…is mixed—perhaps slightly positive,” Vaughn says. “Microdosing is promising mainly because of anecdotal evidence.” Meanwhile, neurostimulation can be used noninvasively in some cases, and TMS has already received FDA approval for a handful of conditions. Neurofeedback is not only non-invasive, but offers immediate feedback, and studies suggest it could be effective for PTSD and addiction.

But it’s important to note that just because these methods could positively alter brain function in people with neuropsychological disorders, that “doesn’t mean it’s going to take a normal system and make it superhuman,” Vaughn says. “I think there are lots of small hacks to be done that could add up to something big,” rather than huge hacks that can vastly upgrade cognitive function, a la Limitless. Thanks to millions of years of evolution, the human brain is already pretty damn optimized. “I just don’t know how much more we can tweak it to make it better,” Vaughn says.

As far as enhancements for neurotypical brains, he says that “you’ll probably see a much greater improvement” from removing distractions in your environment to reduce cognitive load than say, increasing your B12 intake — which brings us to an important disclaimer about nootropic supplements in particular. As with all supplements, they aren’t FDA-regulated, meaning that companies that sell them don’t need to provide evidence that they’re safe or effective. Vaughn recommends trying nootropics that research has shown to be safe and effective, like B12 or caffeine.

How can I start neurohacking?

As tempting as it is, adopting every neurohack under the sun is “not the answer,” Vaughn says. Remember, everyone is different. While your best friend may gush about how much her mood has improved since she began microdosing shrooms, your brain might not respond to microdosing—or maybe taking psychedelics just doesn’t align with your ethics.

Start by exploring different neurohacks, and of course, be skeptical of any product that makes outrageous claims. Since neurofeedback isn’t a common medical treatment, talk to your doctor about enrolling in academic studies on neurofeedback, or companies that offer it if you’re interested, Vaughn says. You should also talk to your doctor if you want to try brain stimulation. A doctor can prescribe you Adderall, Ritalin, or Provigil but only for their indicated medical uses, not for cognitive enhancement.

Ultimately, neurohacks are tools, Vaughn says. “You have to find the one that works for you.” If anything, taking this DIY approach to improving your brain function will leave you feeling empowered, a benefit that probably rivals anything a supplement or sleep tracking app could offer.

 

via What is neurohacking and can it actually rewire your brain?

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB PAGE] Pioneering rehabilitation app helps physios track patients’ progress and prescribe exercise videos

Ascenti PhysioNow image

Independent physiotherapy provider Ascenti has launched PhysioNow, a new exercise and rehabilitation app which aims to revolutionise the way musculoskeletal injury is treated by providing patients with physiotherapy services at the touch of a button.

PhysioNow supports users throughout their journey to recovery by providing 24/7 access to expert advice through digital triage, virtual consultations and tailored exercise programmes from approved Ascenti clinicians. Users can book appointments directly through the app and try out exercises in their own home, with access to guided videos that can be downloaded and viewed at any time.

A fully integrated digital care solution, the app will benefit patients by allowing them to track their own progress and compliance with their rehabilitation programme, improve their knowledge and empowerment through education and self-management advice, and increase their confidence knowing they are following the correct exercise prescription.

PhysioNow is fully integrated with Ascenti’s bespoke patient workflow system. This means that physiotherapists can prescribe video exercises, track patient progress and adjust according to real-time patient feedback, all within the same system that supports them in all other aspects of their daily role (from writing treatment notes to accessing clinical dairies).

For patients, this means a digitally enhanced and hassle-free journey, whether their treatment is face-to-face or virtual.

Currently, a third of all musculoskeletal referrals Ascenti receives come from patients suffering with back pain. PhysioNow will enable enhanced clinical outcomes and more cost-effective care, including for common conditions such as back pain.

A beta test version of the app launched earlier this year and has been used by 1,400 patients, with 93 percent of users endorsing the app and saying that they would recommend it to friends and family.

The PhysioNow app is available to all Ascenti patients and will be accessible when they book their first physio appointment.

Additionally, the app will be available to download from the App Store for Apple iOS users and the Play Store for android devices. There will also be a web-based service that people can use at physionow.ascenti.co.uk

Stephanie Dobrikova, CEO at Ascenti, commented: “The launch of PhysioNow makes Ascenti the market leader when it comes to the provision of digitally-enabled physiotherapy and musculoskeletal (MSK) services.

“In today’s healthcare industry we are seeing more and more technological advances that are transforming patient care – improving the experience of clinicians and service users alike.

“Our Digital Health Strategy has placed us at the forefront of these advancements and our mission is to keep bringing the very best digitally enabled services to our patients and partners.”

Ascenti is a provider of physiotherapy and associated services in the UK and is a trusted partner to more than 20 NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups and 400 private businesses across the UK.

The company has over 300 highly trained clinicians delivering upwards of 52,000 treatment sessions every month.

via Pioneering rehabilitation app helps physios track patients’ progress and prescribe exercise videos – AT Today

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] imHere Homepage – mHealth Platform for Self-management

IMHERE

Interactive Mobile Health and Rehabilitation

iMHere is an mHealth platform promoting clinician-guided self-care to patients with chronic diseases. Internet accessibility provides a secure bridge between patients’ smartphone applications and a web-based clinician portal, and successfully empowers patients to perform subjective self-care and preventative measures. The app was designed to send monitorial data to the portal and also receive output regarding self-care regimens as recommended by the attending clinician. The combination of interactive, real-time medical monitoring with patient control offers a powerful, unique solution for patients living with chronic illnesses where cognitive and physical disabilities present significant barriers to effective self-care.

Using a web-based portal, the clinician (typically a nurse coordinator, social worker, case manager, or patient advocate) could monitor patients’ compliance with regimens and indicate self-care plans to be delivered to the patient via the app, allowing the clinician to monitor a patient’s status and intervene as needed. Clinicians could use the portal to tailor a regimen or treatment plan for each and every patient (e.g. scheduled medication, wound care instructions, etc.) and the portal would consolidate the plan to the smartphone app in real time—an advancement over existing comparable health portals which cannot push data to the app. Results of clinical implementation suggest that the iMHere app was successful in delivering values for patients and in engaging them to comply with treatment. In the first 6 months of the clinical implementation, patients have been consistently using the app for self-management tasks and to follow the regimes set up by their respective clinicians. We observed that the daily usage increased significantly in the first two months (from approximately 1.3-times/day to over 3-times/day), and then plateau at around 3.5 times per day per patient. This pattern of increasing usage in the first two months and the subsequent plateau is relatively consistent across all patients. The app is currently available in Android platform with an iPhone version under development.

via imHere Homepage – mHealth Platform for Self-management

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Flint Rehab Introduces MiGo Wearable for Stroke Recovery

MiGo

Flint Rehab announces the launch of MiGo, a wearable activity tracker specifically designed for stroke survivors. The device makes its official debut at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

MiGo is designed to track upper extremity activity — in addition to walking — and is optimized for the movement patterns performed by individuals with stroke. The device is accompanied by a smartphone app that provides motivational support through digital coaching, progressive goal setting, and social networking with other stroke survivors, according to the company in a media release.

“Most wearable fitness trackers are designed to help people get into shape. MiGo is a new type of wearable that helps people regain their independence after a stroke,” says Dr Nizan Friedman, co-founder and CEO of Irvine, Calif-based Flint Rehab, in the release.

“Traditionally, innovation in medical technology has been limited by what insurance companies are willing to cover. As a consumer-level digital health technology, MiGo avoids these constraints, empowering stroke survivors to take their recovery into their own hands.”

A common outcome of stroke is hemiparesis, or impaired movement on one side of the body. One of the leading causes of this lifelong disability is a phenomenon called “learned non-use,” where stroke survivors neglect to use their impaired arm or leg, causing their brain to lose the ability to control those limbs altogether.

MiGo directly addresses the problem of learned non-use by motivating stroke survivors to use their impaired side as much as possible. Using deep-learning algorithms, MiGo accurately tracks how much the wearer is using their impaired side, providing them with an easy-to-understand rep count throughout the day.

MiGo also provides an intelligent activity goal that updates every day based on the wearer’s actual movement ability, ensuring every user stays continuously challenged at the level appropriate for them. Then, the device acts as the wearer’s personal cheerleader, giving them rewards and positive feedback right on their wrist as they work to hit their daily goal, the release explains.

“Suffering a stroke is a traumatic, life-changing event. Many survivors do not have the proper support network to deal with the event, and they may find it difficult to relate with friends and family who don’t understand what they are going through,” states Dan Zondervan, co-founder and vice president of Flint Rehab.

“Using the MiGo app, users can join groups to share their activity data and collaborate with other stroke survivors to achieve group goals. Group members can also share their experiences and offer encouraging support to each other — right in the app,” he adds.

For more information, visit Flint Rehab.

[Source(s0): Flint Rehab, Business Wire]

 

via Flint Rehab Introduces MiGo Wearable for Stroke Recovery – Rehab Managment

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[FREE App] Google Live Transcribe (Android): Transcribe What Anyone Is Saying – Video

Android Accessibility: Live Transcribe

Google Live Transcribe is an accessibility tool meant to make life easier for those who are deaf or hard of hearing. It automatically turns any speech into text while the person is still speaking. It’s fast enough to be used in conversations.



Android Accessibility: Live Transcribe

The text can be a black font on a white background or a white font on a black background. The top-right corner indicates whether the environment is noisy, which means people have to speak louder to be heard. And if someone speaks to you from behind, the phone vibrates to let you know. Try it out, it works surprisingly smoothly.

The app uses Google’s Cloud Speech API, so it requires an active internet connection. Google says it doesn’t store any audio on its servers, but we’d take such proclamations with a pinch of salt. Google already knows a lot about you, and they do share data with authorities.

Download: Google Live Transcribe for Android (Free)

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[REHABDATA] 20 apps for student success – National Rehabilitation Information Center

NARIC Accession Number: O21594.  What’s this? Download article in Full Text .
Author(s): O’Sullivan, Paige.
Project Number: 90RT5021 (formerly H133B130014).
Publication Year: 2017.
Number of Pages: 5.
Abstract: This list identifies software applications (apps) that may be helpful in key areas in which students with and without mental health conditions may need additional support. Some of these apps are only for use on desktops, while most are available on iPhones or Android products.
Descriptor Terms: ACCOMMODATION, ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY, COMPUTER APPLICATIONS, COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION, HEALTH PROMOTION, MENTAL HEALTH, PSYCHIATRIC DISABILITIES, STUDENTS, TELECOMMUNICATIONS.

Can this document be ordered through NARIC’s document delivery service*?: Y.
Get this Document: http://tucollaborative.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/20-Apps-for-Student-Success.pdf.

Citation: O’Sullivan, Paige. (2017). 20 apps for student success. Retrieved 4/19/2019, from REHABDATA database.via Articles, Books, Reports, & Multimedia: Search REHABDATA | National Rehabilitation Information Center

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: