Posts Tagged Apple

[NEWS] Anti-Tremor Function is One of this Mouse Adapter’s Cool Features

Published on 

AMAneo BTi

Inclusive Technology releases the AMAneo BTi, an adapter designed to enable people with disabilities to operate an iPad or iPhone directly with any mouse or assistive mouse, including track ball, joystick, head mouse, thumb mouse, and more.

Previously, the most common iPad or iPhone operation method was using Switch Control of the iOS.

However, to use this adapter, simply plug in the mouse and connect it to the iPhone, iPad, or iPad Mini using Bluetooth. A touch pointer then automatically appears on the device’s screen enabling full control over the iPad. There are no additional apps to install, according to a media release from UK-based Inclusive Technology. Its US distributor is located in Waxhaw, NC.

Other interaction options include click and drag, auto click and click delay. Two switch ports are also provided, enabling the option of controlling the left and right mouse button with two external switches.

Additional features include instant access to Apple’s AssistiveTouch Menu, which gives users access to several iPad controls such as volume control and the Home button, as well as an innovative anti-tremor function to filter out any shaking of the hand or head and ensure that the on-screen cursor moves smoothly, according to a media release.

The AMAneo BTi charges using a Micro USB and lasts for up to 20 hours of operation.

[Source: Inclusive Technology]

 

via Anti-Tremor Function is One of this Mouse Adapter’s Cool Features – Rehab Managment

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Constant Therapy: A Mobile Solution for Brain Rehabilitation

The Constant Therapy app is a virtual clinic, leading users through a digital door toward more than 100,000 speech, language and cognitive exercises.

Created by the Learning Corp and built by an expert team of neuroscientists and clinicians at Boston University, this award-winning app was developed with the goal of helping people with learning disabilities or those recovering from traumatic brain injury, stroke or aphasia.

Screen of constant therapy app

Constant Therapy includes 50 categories of tasks with varying degrees of difficulty. It automatically assigns tasks to users based on their initial evaluation and performance history. Exercises range from spelling, rhyming and sentence completion to picture matching, map reading, multiplication and much more. The app’s library of therapy resources is continually updated and constantly growing.

Not only does this app enable users to engage in therapy from the comfort of their home, but it also allows clinicians to track their progress and pinpoint areas in need of improvement. Through advanced analytics, they can see exactly where their patients are on the road to recovery. This data also encourages users by clearly showing them the positive leaps they are taking.

Constant therapy app screen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out a few of the several rave reviews for this app:

“My 75-year-old husband had a stroke last year. He had never used a computer before the stroke but finds it easy to use the Constant Therapy app on the iPad. He was an avid crossword puzzle fan so this is a nice challenge for him. He is eager to use the app daily because he’s rewarded with new material as he masters what he’s working on. The tasks in the app are very applicable and practical in everyday life, and the immediate feedback is excellent. I have witnessed my husband getting so much better from using this app. I have spent hours looking for other brain and speech therapy apps, and nothing compares to Constant Therapy.”  ~ Terri 

Constant therapy app screen

“I cannot recommend the Constant Therapy app enough. For the past six months, my son has used the app about three times a week. The app is like a virtual therapist, it’s very easy to use and it gives him immediate feedback. He now understands things faster, can make decisions with less hesitation, has improved recognition of words and his confidence is higher. I also find it easy to get in touch with customer service; they pleasantly help out. The whole experience has been great.” ~ Miriam

 “Thank you for this product. The Constant Therapy app has given me back some of my dignity. It allows me to get up in the morning knowing I can accomplish something and feel good.” ~ Sheree

If you or a loved one could benefit from the Constant Therapy app, visit https://www.constanttherapy.com for more information.

Check out this video!

 

via Constant Therapy: A Mobile Solution for Brain Rehabilitation – Assistive Technology at Easter Seals Crossroads

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[ARTICLE] Media: Home exercise programs made effortless using the PhysioTherapy eXercises patient app – Journal of Physiotherapy

PhysioTherapy eXercises website: www.physiotherapyexercises.com

PhysioTherapy eXercises is a publicly available website, created by Harvey, Messenger, Glinsky, Pattie and a collaboration of physiotherapists. It was designed as a resource for creating and distributing home exercise programs. The website has a database of images, videos and instructions for over 1000 exercises focusing on impairments (strength, balance, range of motion, and cardiovascular fitness), and activities (reaching and manipulation, sit to stand, transfers, and mobility), and is available in 13 different languages. The exercises are evidence-based and include exercises for children through to the elderly, as well as exercises targeting specific populations, such as acute and degenerative neurological conditions, and musculoskeletal conditions, including whiplash and hand injuries. The Physiotherapy Exercises App is one feature of this web-based software and is the focus of this review.

The Physiotherapy Exercises App is free and can be used on both Apple and Android tablets and phones. The app is designed for patients to use, and allows them to access their prescribed home exercise program on their devices, record their progress online, and share this information remotely with their therapist. A recent randomised, controlled trial reported that using the Physiotherapy Exercises App increased adherence to home exercise programs when compared with paper-based methods.1

The therapist designs a home exercise program by selecting relevant exercises from the database and scheduling the frequency and duration of the exercises using the PhysioTherapy eXercises website. The patient then accesses and installs the Physiotherapy Exercises App via a link embedded in an email or smart phone text message that is sent from the website. Once the app is installed, patients have direct access to their home exercise program. The app allows patients to view their program, record completion of each exercise, and provide feedback to the therapist via a ‘notes’ function. The therapist has the ability to remotely monitor the patient’s exercise adherence, review notes recorded by the patient, and adjust the program as required by logging onto the website. Therapists can also receive a notification via an email when a patient’s adherence has decreased below a set threshold, which can be adjusted by the therapist for each patient.

Ease of use

Overall, the design of the Physiotherapy Exercises App is straightforward and the basic features are easy to use. My experience suggests that patients who already use the Internet and/or mobile devices are willing to use the Physiotherapy Exercises App, and use it successfully. Patients with limited technology experience are able to use the app successfully if provided with assistance to download the app and are given a demonstration of how to use it. Once the app has been downloaded, patients have two options: view the exercises that are to be completed on that day via the home screen (Figure 1A); or touch the screen to access the illustration, aims, instructions and dosage for each exercise (Figure 1B). Similarly, recording of the completed exercises can be done by ticking the ‘done all’ box on the home screen or ticking a box on each screen for an individual exercise. Patients can record completing an exercise even if it is not scheduled for a particular day. Notes can be added on each screen that details an individual exercise.

Figure 1 Opens large image

Figure 1
A. Example of the home screen of an exercise program on the Physiotherapy Exercises App. B. Example of an individual exercise screen, including illustration, patient’s aims, patient’s instructions, instructions for repetitions and the exercise schedule. The black boxes indicate the days the exercise has been scheduled, and ticks indicate that the patient has completed those exercises on that day.

From the perspective of therapist use, the home exercise program is prescribed and monitored by logging directly onto the website. The website has an extensive help section to assist the therapist if required.

Strengths and limitations

The Physiotherapy Exercises App is very well designed for clinical use. One of the key strengths is that patients can only access their home exercise program once it has been prescribed to them by a therapist, which ensures that patients complete exercises appropriate for their rehabilitation. Another valuable feature is that once the Physiotherapy Exercises App has been downloaded, there is no requirement for the patient to login or remember passwords. Other strengths are that the interface is easy to understand, and patients receive detailed information about each exercise, including the aims of the exercise, illustrations, instructions on how to complete the exercise, dosage, precautions, and progressions. Furthermore, therapists have the ability to select what information the patient views on the app and/or modify the instructions and information if required. When the home exercise program is updated online, all changes occur in real time.

Limitations of the Physiotherapy Exercises App are that few patients use all the features of the app, for example the notes function. My experience using the app with people who have Parkinson’s disease is that most people primarily use the app to view and record completion of their home exercise programs. Further encouragement by the therapist is necessary to ensure regular use of the notes function, if desired. At present, patients do not receive an alert via the Physiotherapy Exercises App that their program has been updated; it simply changes on the home screen. Consequently, if the program is updated independently of a consultation, an additional form of communication may be required to inform the patient of changes made.

Conclusion

Overall, the Physiotherapy Exercises App is an excellent and easy to use clinical resource. Increasing the use of devices to provide home exercise programs directly to patients is highly desirable and resource-efficient. It gives patients access to their home exercise program at all times, facilitates self-management, and, importantly, increases communication between the patient and therapist. The advantages of the Physiotherapy Exercises Appare that it is freely available, has an extensive range of exercises covering both musculoskeletal and neurological conditions, and is easy to use for both therapist and patient. Combined with the ability to remotely monitor patients’ adherence to the home exercise program, the Physiotherapy Exercises App has been a valuable addition to my clinical practice and role as a clinical educator.

Reference

  1. Lambert, T. et al. J Physiother201763161–167

View in Article – Abstract – Full Text –  Full Text PDF – PubMed – Scopus (3) – Google Scholar

 

via Media: Home exercise programs made effortless using the PhysioTherapy eXercises patient app – Journal of Physiotherapy

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] 17 Apps That Can Make Life Easier With Brain Fog and Chronic Illness

If you struggle with brain fog due to chronic illness or medication, it can be difficult to keep track of all your doctor appointments, medications and symptoms – not to mention all your other responsibilities, such as work, chores or taking care of your family. Staying organized and remembering everything you put on your mental to-do list can be a challenge for anyone, but with brain fog and a chronic illness thrown into the mix, it becomes especially important to find the methods that most help you stay on top of things.

For many with chronic illness, smartphones can be a lifesaver. Many of us carry our phones everywhere we go anyway, so utilizing them as a tool to keep track of our lives and our illnesses can be extremely helpful. Most smartphones nowadays come with apps already programmed in, such as a notepad, a calendar or a voice memo recorder, which are simple, easy to use and great for jotting down important notes or dates.

However, if you struggle with brain fog and are looking for a different way to organize your notes, lists, calendar and medical information, then there are a number of other apps you may find to be extremely useful.

To help you manage your personal life, professional life, and physical and mental health, we asked our Mighty community to share which apps help them navigate their day-to-day lives despite the effects of brain fog. Here are their recommendations.

Just so you know, we’ve selected these links to make shopping easier for you. We do not receive any funds from purchases or downloads you make.

1. Habitica

habitica screenshot

Habitica is a video game that allows you to “gamify” your life by turning your daily activities and to-do lists into monsters to conquer. It can help motivate you to change your habits by giving you in-game incentives every time you complete a task. You can play on your computer or download the app for either iOS and Android.

Jess Van Meter told The Mighty, “It’s amazing. It helps me pretend my life is a video game and doing self-care, building habits and performing daily tasks actually does help me ‘level up.’ It has a built in community and reward system too.”

Sara Wilson added, “I can put as many tasks on it as I want, little or large, and it’s also a game, so I get coins whenever I complete a task! I can set up IRL [in real life] rewards for myself for earning so many coins and that helps keep me motivated. I check it several times a day and one last time before bed. I put everything on there from medications to everyday tasks to important, one-time events.”

Download Habitica for free from Apple or Google Play.

2. Medisafe

medisafe

Medisafe helps you keep track of which medications you need to take and when. Each day is divided into four quadrants – morning, afternoon, evening, night – with visual representations of which pills you should be taking at which time. The app will send you reminders when it’s time to take your pills, and it also provides you with information about each medication. Physicians and pharmacists are also able to connect with patients and communicate through Medisafe.

“It has the details of all my meds and alerts me to what I need to take and when. I always forget to take anything without the app reminders! Now I only have to worry about brain fog making me forget if I actually did take the meds it told me to before I pressed the ‘take all’ button,” Amie Addison wrote.

“It reminds me to take my meds and business calendar reminds me of all my day to day stuff,” Marnie Dueck told us.

Download Medisafe for free from Apple or Google Play.

3. Daylio

daylio screenshots

Daylio is a mobile diary that lets you easily track how you’re feeling and what you’re doing. Over time, the app can help you discover patterns in your moods, behavior and activities so you can make changes to your daily routine that will help you to feel your best.

Liberty White wrote, “Great for symptom tracking and customizing. It beeps at the end of the day and I tell it how my day went. It tracks trends in my activities (or lack of activities) and helps me keep track of when I’m having a bad time.”

Download Daylio for free from Apple or Google Play.

4. Flaredown

flaredown app

Flaredown was made just for people with chronic illness as a way to track symptoms, record treatments and reactions, track triggers and connect with others who have similar conditions. There are also places where you can easily note other important parts of your day, such as what you ate, what the weather was like, and any activities or events that took place.

“By far my favorite app to track my various symptoms!” Bay Howe said. “Makes it much easier to discuss symptoms and illnesses when you can remember what they are and when they happen.”

Download Flaredown for free from Apple or Google Play.

5. Evernote

evernote app

Evernote is a note-taking app that helps you stay organized in your personal and/or professional life. You can add notes in a variety of forms, including text, sketches, photos, audio, video, PDF and web clippings, and have everything saved in one place.

Morgan Storm Ray said, “I use Evernote. I also have memory loss so it helps with that too. It is a simple note-taking app. But it has a bunch of different ways to take notes. By voice, picture, text, etc.”

Jess N. Law added, “Evernote – for notes on anything and everything I can’t remember. I also use it to record meetings because multitasking has gotten too difficult.”

Download Evernote Basic for free from Apple or Google Play.

6. CareZone

carezone app

CareZone offers patients a simple way to keep track of all their medical information. Several of its features include a journal for documenting symptoms, to-do lists, contacts (doctors, pharmacies, insurance providers, etc.), medication information (names, dosages, reminders for when it’s time to refill, etc.) and a calendar for keeping track of appointments and other important dates. Any information you input remains private and secure.

Nancy Lea Martine Koontz told us, “I use CareZone which includes all kinds of daily trackers and makes sharing information with doctors quite easy.“

Download CareZone for free from Apple or Google Play.

7. Asana

asana

For those who work with a company or business, Asana is an app that can help you and your team stay organized, manage projects and track your progress. This app allows you to create project task lists and personal to-do lists, track when work is due with a calendar and converse with coworkers about various tasks or projects.

“[I use] Asana – a project management app. I can list phone calls, emails, work, everything I need to do today or in the future. It’s free and has saved my business,” Jess N. Law wrote.

Download Asana for free from Apple or Google Play.

8. myHomework

myhomework app

The myHomework app is a virtual planner for students. You can track when assignments, essays or projects are due, track your class schedule and receive due date or test reminders.

“I’m a full-time student,” said Eri Rhodes. “The myHomework app is critical to me not forgetting due dates.”

Download myHomework Basic for free from AppleGoogle PlayMicrosoft or Amazon.

9. Microsoft OneNote

microsoft onenote

Microsoft OneNote is a place you can jot down any important notes, information or thoughts that cross your mind – in whichever way works best for you. You can type, write, draw, make to-do lists or clip things from the web, and OneNote keeps everything organized and easy to find.

“I have OneNote on my phone. It’s basically an electronic notebook and you can make as many [notes] as you want, but I find it helpful because if I want to remember something for later, I can just open it and type it out then go back to look at it later when I need the information. Also have it on my computer and tablet all connected so I always have access to it,” said Chelsea Smith.

Download Microsoft OneNote from MicrosoftApple or Google Play.

10. MyTherapy

mytherapy app

MyTherapy gives you reminders when it’s time to take your medication, take measurements or do exercises, and it also serves as a journal where you can track your symptoms and overall health.

Anna A. Legault told us, “MyTherapy helps me remember medications, measurements and log symptoms.”

Download MyTherapy for free from Apple or Google Play.

11. TaoMix 2

taomix 2 app

Living with chronic illness and brain fog can be stressful, and while it’s important to keep track of your physical health, caring for your mental health is necessary, too. TaoMix 2 provides you with soundscapes you can mix and match to help you relax or meditate. Whether you’re soothed by the sounds of waves crashing on the beach or the quiet chatter of people in a café, this app can help take your mind off the stresses of chronic illness.

All kinds of reminders and calendar apps are a must,” said Irma-Helen Lorentzon. “But something that really helps me is TaoMix – it has great nature sounds and I use it to help my brain focus and/or relax.”

Download TaoMix 2 for free from Apple or Google Play.

12. Google Calendar

google calendar app

Google Calendar can help you keep track of important dates or events. You can view the calendar by day, week or month, color code events and, if you use Gmail, import dates from there. You can also schedule reminders to give you a heads up about upcoming events.

Tiffany Anne told us, “I use Google Calendar to remind myself if I need to bring something somewhere, follow up on something or anything that requires reminders since I pay attention to those.”

Heather Jo Skidmore said, “Google Calendar. One for work, one for my MA program, one for my three kids’ activities. Color coded, and shared with my husband.”

Download Google Calendar app for free from Apple or Google Play.

13. ColorNote

colornote app

This Android app lets you make color-coded notes and checklists to help you stay organized. You can also set reminders for each note to make sure you get each task done on time.

Christine Cousins wrote, “I love ColorNote. I can make checklists for groceries or things I need to get done or write myself notes about things I need to discuss with my doctors so I’m prepared for my appointment. The app automatically backs everything up, so when my phone took a swim and I downloaded ColorNote on a new device, all of my stuff was there!”

Download ColorNote for free from Google Play or Amazon.

14. Stop, Breathe & Think

stop, breathe & think app

This meditation app encourages you to stop what you’re doing and check in with how you’re feeling, practice some mindful breathing and think deeply to broaden your perspectives and increase your level of relaxation.

“SBT is an amazing app that allows you to rate how you’re feeling physically and mentally and specify certain emotions. It then tabulates and suggests meditation/mindfulness exercises in order to attend to whatever issues you’re experiencing. Once finished with an exercise, you can again rate how you’re feeling. You can earn stickers as you accomplish certain exercises, and it keeps track of your emotional and physical check-ins. Pretty cool,” Meghan Leigh explained.

Download Stop, Breathe & Think for free from Apple or Google Play or use on your web browser.

15. ICE Contact

ice app

If you have a medical condition and ever find yourself in an emergency situation, an ICE (In Case of Emergency) app may be of use. You can store all your personal and medical information here for either yourself or others to access in an emergency. Having this information handy can also be useful if you struggle with brain fog.

Stephanie Bowman told us, “I use an ICE app. It stores a list of all my illnesses, medication, people to contact and my allergies. I’m never stuck when put on the spot to think of important information.”

Download ICE for free from Apple.

16. Cozi

cozi app

Cozi is an organization app specifically designed for families. You can keep all of your family’s activities and appointments in one place, and create checklists (grocery lists, chore lists, to-do lists, etc.) to share with other family members.

Crystal Dewey said, “It’s a calendar app on steroids! It connects with my family members, sends reminders, we can all add to-do and grocery lists… It’s my electronic brain!”

Download Cozi for free from AppleGoogle Play or Microsoft.

17. Waze

waze app

Waze is a navigation app that lets you know what traffic conditions are like in real time and which route you should take. Waze can also give you reminders when it’s time to leave based on both the time you need to arrive and current traffic. After you arrive at your destination, park your car and close Waze, it will automatically drop a pin to remind you later on exactly where you parked.

Jess N. Law recommends integrating Waze with Google Calendar. “Reminds me of everything I have planned and when to leave. Lifesaver some days.”

Download Waze for free from Apple or Google Play.

 

via 17 Apps That Can Make Life Easier With Brain Fog and Chronic Illness | The Mighty

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Article in Press] Home exercise programs made effortless using the PhysioTherapy eXercises patient app – Full Text

PhysioTherapy eXercises website: www.physiotherapyexercises.com

PhysioTherapy eXercises is a publicly available website, created by Harvey, Messenger, Glinsky, Pattie and a collaboration of physiotherapists. It was designed as a resource for creating and distributing home exercise programs. The website has a database of images, videos and instructions for over 1000 exercises focusing on impairments (strength, balance, range of motion, and cardiovascular fitness), and activities (reaching and manipulation, sit to stand, transfers, and mobility), and is available in 13 different languages. The exercises are evidence-based and include exercises for children through to the elderly, as well as exercises targeting specific populations, such as acute and degenerative neurological conditions, and musculoskeletal conditions, including whiplash and hand injuries. The Physiotherapy Exercises App is one feature of this web-based software and is the focus of this review.

The Physiotherapy Exercises App is free and can be used on both Apple and Android tablets and phones. The app is designed for patients to use, and allows them to access their prescribed home exercise program on their devices, record their progress online, and share this information remotely with their therapist. A recent randomised, controlled trial reported that using the Physiotherapy Exercises App increased adherence to home exercise programs when compared with paper-based methods.1

The therapist designs a home exercise program by selecting relevant exercises from the database and scheduling the frequency and duration of the exercises using the PhysioTherapy eXercises website. The patient then accesses and installs the Physiotherapy Exercises App via a link embedded in an email or smart phone text message that is sent from the website. Once the app is installed, patients have direct access to their home exercise program. The app allows patients to view their program, record completion of each exercise, and provide feedback to the therapist via a ‘notes’ function. The therapist has the ability to remotely monitor the patient’s exercise adherence, review notes recorded by the patient, and adjust the program as required by logging onto the website. Therapists can also receive a notification via an email when a patient’s adherence has decreased below a set threshold, which can be adjusted by the therapist for each patient.

Ease of use

Overall, the design of the Physiotherapy Exercises App is straightforward and the basic features are easy to use. My experience suggests that patients who already use the Internet and/or mobile devices are willing to use the Physiotherapy Exercises App, and use it successfully. Patients with limited technology experience are able to use the app successfully if provided with assistance to download the app and are given a demonstration of how to use it. Once the app has been downloaded, patients have two options: view the exercises that are to be completed on that day via the home screen (Figure 1A); or touch the screen to access the illustration, aims, instructions and dosage for each exercise (Figure 1B). Similarly, recording of the completed exercises can be done by ticking the ‘done all’ box on the home screen or ticking a box on each screen for an individual exercise. Patients can record completing an exercise even if it is not scheduled for a particular day. Notes can be added on each screen that details an individual exercise.

Figure 1

Enter a caption

From the perspective of therapist use, the home exercise program is prescribed and monitored by logging directly onto the website. The website has an extensive help section to assist the therapist if required.

Strengths and limitations

The Physiotherapy Exercises App is very well designed for clinical use. One of the key strengths is that patients can only access their home exercise program once it has been prescribed to them by a therapist, which ensures that patients complete exercises appropriate for their rehabilitation. Another valuable feature is that once the Physiotherapy Exercises App has been downloaded, there is no requirement for the patient to login or remember passwords. Other strengths are that the interface is easy to understand, and patients receive detailed information about each exercise, including the aims of the exercise, illustrations, instructions on how to complete the exercise, dosage, precautions, and progressions. Furthermore, therapists have the ability to select what information the patient views on the app and/or modify the instructions and information if required. When the home exercise program is updated online, all changes occur in real time.

Limitations of the Physiotherapy Exercises App are that few patients use all the features of the app, for example the notes function. My experience using the app with people who have Parkinson’s disease is that most people primarily use the app to view and record completion of their home exercise programs. Further encouragement by the therapist is necessary to ensure regular use of the notes function, if desired. At present, patients do not receive an alert via the Physiotherapy Exercises App that their program has been updated; it simply changes on the home screen. Consequently, if the program is updated independently of a consultation, an additional form of communication may be required to inform the patient of changes made.

Conclusion

Overall, the Physiotherapy Exercises App is an excellent and easy to use clinical resource. Increasing the use of devices to provide home exercise programs directly to patients is highly desirable and resource-efficient. It gives patients access to their home exercise program at all times, facilitates self-management, and, importantly, increases communication between the patient and therapist. The advantages of the Physiotherapy Exercises Appare that it is freely available, has an extensive range of exercises covering both musculoskeletal and neurological conditions, and is easy to use for both therapist and patient. Combined with the ability to remotely monitor patients’ adherence to the home exercise program, the Physiotherapy Exercises App has been a valuable addition to my clinical practice and role as a clinical educator.

Reference

  1. Lambert, T. et al. J Physiother201763161–167

View in Article   Abstract   Full Text   Full Text PDF   PubMed   Scopus (1)  Google Scholar

 

via Home exercise programs made effortless using the PhysioTherapy eXercises patient app – Journal of Physiotherapy

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract+References] Development of a tool to facilitate real life activity retraining in hand and arm therapy

Successful recovery of upper extremity function after stroke is more likely when the affected limb is used regularly in daily life. We developed an iPad (Apple) application called the ‘Aid for Decision-Making in Occupation Choice for Hand’ to facilitate daily upper extremity use. This study examined the suitability of items and pictures in the Aid for Decision-Making in Occupation Choice for Hand, and tested a paper prototype of the application (which has since been produced).

We used a Delphi method with 10 expert occupational therapists to refine the items in the aid. Next, we prepared pictures of items in the aid and confirmed their suitability by testing them with 10 patients (seven stroke, three cervical spondylotic myelopathy). Nine occupational therapists conducted field tests with a paper prototype of the aid in clinical practice to examine its utility.

After four Delphi rounds, we selected 130 items representing activities of daily living, organized into 16 categories. Of 130 pictures, 128 were recognizable to patients as representing the intended activities. Based on testing of the paper prototype, we found the Aid for Decision-Making in Occupation Choice for Hand process was suitable for clinical practice, and could be organized into six steps.

The Aid for Decision-Making in Occupation Choice for Hand process may promote daily upper extremity use. This application, since developed, now needs to be clinically tested in its digital form.

 

Ally BA, Budson AE (2007) The worth of pictures: Using high density event-related potentials to understand the memorial power of pictures and the dynamics of recognition memory. NeuroImage 35(1): 378395. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Ally BA, Gold CA, Budson AE (2009) The picture superiority effect in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment. Neuropsychologia 47(2): 595598. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Ally BA, Waring JD, Beth EH, (2008) Aging memory for pictures: Using high-density event-related potentials to understand the effect of aging on the picture superiority effect. Neuropsychologia 46(2): 679689. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Atwal A, Money A, Harvey M (2014) Occupational therapists’ views on using a virtual reality interior design application within the pre-discharge home visit process. Journal of Medical Internet Research 16(12): e283. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Barecca S, Bohannon RW, Charness AL, (2001) Management of the Post Stroke Hemiplegic Arm and Hand: Treatment Recommendations of the 2001 Consensus Panel, Ontario, Canada: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. Google Scholar
Bouvat L, Kangas AJ, Szczech Moser C (2014) iPad apps in early intervention and school-based practice. Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools & Early Intervention 7(1): 115. Google Scholar CrossRef
Che Daud AZ, Yau MK, Barnett F, (2016) Integration of occupation based intervention in hand injury rehabilitation: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Hand Therapy 29(1): 3040. Google Scholar CrossRef
Curran T, Doyle J (2011) Picture superiority doubly dissociates the ERP correlates of recollection and familiarity. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 23(5): 12471262. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Elwyn G, O’Connor A, Stacey D, (2006) International Patient Decision Aids Standards (IPDAS) collaboration. Developing a quality criteria framework for patient decision aid: Online international Delphi consensus process. British Medical Journal 333(7565): 417419. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Embree LM, Budson AE, Ally BA (2012) Memorial familiarity remains intact for pictures but not for words in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Neuropsychologia 50(9): 23332340. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Fujiwara Y, Shinkai S, Amano H, (2003) Test–retest variation in the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence in community-dwelling older people independent in daily living toward individual assessment of functional capacity. [Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi] 50(4): 360367. Google Scholar Medline
Gowland C, Stratford P, Ward M, (1993) Measuring physical impairment and disability with the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment. Stroke 24(1): 5863. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Graham ID, Logan J, Bennett CL, (2007) Physicians’ intentions and use of three patient decision aids. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 7(1): 20. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Gummesson C, Atroshi I, Ekdahl C (2003) The disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) outcome questionnaire: Longitudinal construct validity and measuring self-rated health change after surgery. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 4(1): 11. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Gummesson C, Ward MM, Atroshi I (2006) The shortened disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire (QuickDASH): Validity and reliability based on responses within the full-length DASH. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 7: 44. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Klein RM, Bell B (1982) Self-care skills: Behavioral measurement with Klein-Bell ADL scale. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 63(7): 335338. Google Scholar Medline
Kopp B, Kunkel A, Flor H, (1997) The Arm Motor Ability Test: Reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change of an instrument for assessing disabilities in activities of daily living. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 78(6): 615620. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Kurimoto S (2007) Validity and Reliability of the Hand 20. [Nihon Tegeka Gakkai Zasshi] 24(2): 14. Google Scholar
Lawton MP and Brody EM (1969) Assessment of older people: Self-maintaining and instrumental activities of daily living. Gerontologist 9(3): 179–186.
Lorah ER, Tincani M, Dodge J, (2013) Evaluating picture exchange and the iPad™ as a speech generating device to teach communication to young children with autism. Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities 25(6): 637649. Google Scholar CrossRef
Morris DM, Taub E, Mark VW (2006) Constraint-induced movement therapy: Characterizing the intervention protocol. Europa Medicophysica 42(3): 257–268. Google Scholar
O’Connor AM, Bennett CL, Stacey D, (2009) Decision aids for people facing health treatment or screening decisions. Cochrane Database Systematic Review 3: CD001431. Google Scholar
Ottenbacher KJ, Hsu Y, Granger CV, (1996) The reliability of the functional independence measure: A quantitative review. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 77(12): 12261232. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Pollock A, Farmer SE, Brady MC, (2014) Interventions for improving upper limb function after stroke. Cochrane Database Systematic Review 11: CD010820. Google Scholar
Saposnik G, Chow CM, Gladstone D, (2014) iPad technology for home rehabilitation after stroke (iHOME): A proof-of-concept randomized trial. International Journal of Stroke 9(7): 956962. Google Scholar Link
Shepard RN (1967) Recognition memory for words, sentences, and pictures. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior 6(1): 156163. Google Scholar CrossRef
Shi YX, Tian JH, Yang KH, (2011) Modified constraint-induced movement therapy versus traditional rehabilitation in patients with upper-extremity dysfunction after stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 92(6): 972982. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Sumsion T (1998) The Delphi technique: An adaptive research tool. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy 61(4): 153156. Google Scholar Link
Takebayashi T, Amano S, Hanada K, (2015) A one-year follow-up after modified constraint-induced movement therapy for chronic stroke patients with paretic arm: A prospective case series study. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation 22(1): 1825. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Takebayashi T, Koyama T, Amano S, (2013) A 6-month follow-up after constraint-induced movement therapy with and without transfer package for patients with hemiparesis after stroke: A pilot quasi-randomized controlled trial. Clinical Rehabilitation 27(5): 418426. Google Scholar Link
Taub E, Uswatte G, King DK, (2006) A placebo-controlled trial of constraint-induced movement therapy for upper extremity after stroke. Stroke 37(4): 10451049. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Taub E, Uswatte G, Mark VW, (2013) Method for enhancing real-world use of a more affected arm in chronic stroke: Transfer package of constraint-induced movement therapy. Stroke 44(5): 13831388. Google ScholarCrossRef, Medline
Tomori K, Nagayama H, Saito Y, (2015) Examination of a cut-off score to express the meaningful activity of people with dementia using iPad application (ADOC). Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology 10(2): 126131. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Tomori K, Saito Y, Nagayama H, (2013) Reliability and validity of individualized satisfaction score in aid for decision-making in occupation choice. Disability and Rehabilitation 35(2): 113117. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Tomori K, Uezu S, Kinjo S, (2012) Utilization of the iPad application: Aid for decision-making in occupation choice. Occupational Therapy International 19(2): 8897. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Uswatte G, Taub E, Morris D, (2005) Reliability and validity of the upper-extremity Motor Activity Log-14 for measuring real-world arm use. Stroke 36(11): 24932496. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline
Watanabe T, Kinoshita S, Takahashi C (2010) Further investigation of validity of the Paralytic arm Participation Measure (PPM) and its level of difficulty with each item. [Sagyo Ryoho Journal] 44(6): 489494.Google Scholar
Whiting P, Rutjes AW, Reitsma JB, (2003) The development of QUADAS: A tool for the quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy included in systematic reviews. BMC Medical Research Methodology 3(Suppl 1): 25. Google Scholar CrossRef, Medline

Source: Development of a tool to facilitate real life activity retraining in hand and arm therapy – Mar 28, 2017

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Apple ResearchKit’s New Clinical Trials: Autism, Epilepsy, Melanoma.

Apple launched ResearchKit, its iOS-based platform for clinical research, in March with an initial class of five trials focused on a range of health conditions. Nearly seven months later, the tech giant is welcoming three new trials focused on epilepsy, autism, and melanoma.

ResearchKit was designed to upend how medical research is done. Until now, researchers were mostly limited to who they could recruit based on geographic proximity. By moving a clinical trial onto a mobile device like the iPhone, it opens up a goldmine of data for researchers. Within days of the initial launch, the five studies had thousands of new participants with a diversity of location, background, age and health. That trend has continued, Apple said, helped by more efficient on-boarding via streamlined informed consent and the wealth of data collected by connected devices.

“Researchers have been able to get infinitely richer data sets than before,” said Bud Tribble, MD, PhD, vice president of software engineering at Apple. “Apple has helped accelerate medical research by creating a simple way for scientists to greatly expand the scope of their studies, and this is critical to helping researchers succeed.”

Apple doesn’t directly design the apps. That is all done by the academic and medical institutions running the studies. Instead, the company focuses on providing an open-source framework that’s specially designed for medical and health research. All of which takes advantage of the iPhone’s accelerometer, microphone, gyroscope and camera. One of the latest studies even builds in the Apple Watch.

Below are the three latest studies launching on ResearchKit and what they hope to achieve.

Continue —>  Apple ResearchKit’s New Clinical Trials: Autism, Epilepsy, Melanoma – Fortune

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Johns Hopkins taps Apple Watch, ResearchKit for upcoming epilepsy study with eye on seizure prediction

Seeking deeper insight into epileptic seizures and their effect on the human body, Johns Hopkins’ ResearchKit study will collect heart rate sensor and accelerometer data from Watch, gyroscope data from iPhone and dynamic user feedback to track a variety of biometric measurements during a seizure episode, according to a source familiar with the project. The iPhone and Watch apps, now in beta testing, are slated to go live on Sept. 18.While sensor readings are automated, like many current iPhone-based ResearchKit initiatives, other metrics are not so easily ascertained. Activating the test process and measuring lucidity, for example, require some form of direct user interaction, a steep demand considering the extremely stressful nature of a seizure event. To help participants complete individual sessions they are given physical cues to answer contextual onscreen survey questions via Watch’s Taptic Engine. Alternatively, a caregiver might be able to initiate the testing process if present, the person said.

Continue —> Johns Hopkins taps Apple Watch, ResearchKit for upcoming epilepsy study with eye on seizure prediction

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: