Posts Tagged Arm

[ARTICLE] Role of Practice And Mental Imagery on Hand Function Improvement in Stroke Survivors – Full Text

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Role of Practice and Mental Imagery on Hand function improvement in stroke survivors

Method: We conducted systematic review of the previous studies and searched electronic databases for the years 1995 to 2016, studies were selected according to inclusion criteria, and critical appraisal was done for each study and summarized the use of mental practice for the improvement in hand function in stroke survivors.

Results: Studies differed in the various aspects like intervention protocols, outcome measures, design, and patient’s characteristics. The total number of practice hours to see the potential benefits from mental practice varied widely. Results suggest that mental practice has potential to improve the upper extremity function in stroke survivors.

Conclusion: Although the benefits of mental practice to improve upper extremity function looks promising, general guidelines for the clinical use of mental practice is difficult to make. Future research should explore the dosage, factors affecting the use of Mental Practice, effects of Mental Therapy alone without in combination with other interventions.

Introduction

Up to 85% stroke survivors experience hemi paresis resulting in impaired movement of the arm, and hand as reported by Nakayama et al. Loss of arm function adversely affects quality of life and functional motor recovery in affected upper extremity.

Sensorimotor deficits in the upper limb, such as weakness, decreased speed of movement, decreased angular excursion and impaired temporal coordination of the joints impaired upper-limb and trunk coordination.

Treatment interventions such as materials-based occupations constraint-induced movement therapy modified constraint-induced movement therapy and task-related or task-specific training are common training methods for remediating impairments and restoring function in the upper limb.

For the improvement of upper and lower functions, physical therapy provides training for functional improvement and fine motor. For most patients such rehabilitation training has many constraints of time, place and expense, accordingly in recent studies, clinical methods such as mental practice for improvement of the upper and lower functions have been suggested.

Mental practice is a training method during which a person cognitively rehearses a physical skill using motor imagery in the absence of overt, physical movements for the purpose of enhancing motor skill performance. For example, a review of the duration of mental movements found temporal equivalence for reaching; grasping; writing; and cyclical activities, such as walking and running.

Evidence for the idea that motor imagery training could enhance the recovery of hand function comes from several lines of research: the sports literature; neurophysiologic evidence; health psychology research; as well as preliminary findings using motor imagery techniques in stroke patients.

Much interest has been raised by the potential of Motor Practice of Motor task, also called “Motor Imagery” as a neuro rehabilitation technique to enhance Motor Recovery following Stroke.

Mental Practice is a training method during which a person cognitively rehearsals a physical skill using Motor Imagery in the absence of Physical movements for the purpose of enhancing Motor skill performance.

The merits of this intervention are that the patient concentration and motivation can be enhanced without regard to time and place and the training is possible without expensive equipment.

Researchers have speculated about its utility in neurorehabilitation. In fact, several review articles examining the impact of mental practice have been published. Two reviews examined stroke outcomes in general and did not limit their review to upper-extremity–focused outcomes. Both articles included studies that were published in 2005 or earlier.

Previous reviews, however, did not attempt to rate the studies reviewed in terms of the level of evidence. Thus, in this review, we determined whether mental practice is an effective intervention strategy to remediate impairments and improve upper-limb function after stroke by examining and rating the current evidence. […]

Continue –>  Role of Practice And Mental Imagery on Hand Function Improvement in Stroke Survivors | Insight Medical Publishing

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[ARTICLE] An Evaluation of the Design and Usability of a Novel Robotic Bilateral Arm Rehabilitation Device for Patients with Stroke – Full Text

Introduction: Robot-assisted therapy for upper limb rehabilitation is an emerging research topic and its design process must integrate engineering, neurological pathophysiology, and clinical needs.

Purpose of the study: This study developed/evaluated the usefulness of a novel rehabilitation device, the MirrorPath, designed for the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with hemiplegic stroke.

Methods: The process follows Tseng’s methodology for innovative product design and development, namely two stages, device development and usability assessment. During the development process, the design was guided by patients’ rehabilitation needs as defined by patients and their therapists. The design applied synchronic movement of the bilateral upper limbs, an approach that is compatible with the bilateral movement therapy and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation theories. MirrorPath consists of a robotic device that guides upper limb movement linked to a control module containing software controlling the robotic movement.

Results: Five healthy subjects were recruited in the pretest, and 4 patients, 4 caregivers, and 4 therapists were recruited in the formal test for usability. All recruited subjects were allocated to the test group, completed the evaluation, and their data were all analyzed. The total system usability scale score obtained from the patients, caregivers, and therapists was 71.8 ± 11.9, indicating a high level of usability and product acceptance.

Discussion and conclusion: Following a standard development process, we could yield a design that meets clinical needs. This low-cost device provides a feasible platform for carrying out robot-assisted bilateral movement therapy of patients with hemiplegic stroke.

Clinical Trial Registration: identifier NCT02698605.

Introduction

The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed countries and involves approximately 15 million stoke events annually. One-third of stroke patients die and a further one-third of events results in permanent disability. Depending on the location of the brain insult, stroke can lead to a wide range of functional impairments (Mackay et al., 2004); these include language, cognition, sensation, and motor functions. Motor impairment impacts the patient’s ability to perform activities of daily living. For the majority of patients, recovery of motor function involving an upper limb is slower than that of lower limb (Feys et al., 1998). Indeed, most activities of daily living rely the functioning of the upper limb, thus emphasizing the need for effective upper limb rehabilitation.

With an attempt to enhance the effectiveness of upper limb rehabilitation among stroke patients, a series of rehabilitation techniques have been developed and refined in recent decades; these include task-oriented motor training, constraint-induced movement therapy, mirror therapy, and bilateral movement training. Each of these methods has a number of theoretical advocates and each has been shown to be effective clinically. For instance, bilateral movement therapy, which involves coordinated movement of the bilateral upper limbs, has been shown to enhance upper limb recovery and coordination between the hands. Stoykov et al. (2009) found that bilateral arm training is more effective than unilateral training when restoring proximal upper limb function because it seems to improve the functional linkages between the bilateral hemispheres.

Even after receiving a full course of conventional rehabilitation, 60% of stroke patients still have difficulties when using their affected upper limb (Kwakkel et al., 1999). As a result, it has become the upmost importance to develop novel rehabilitation strategies that are able to help patients reach a higher level of recovery. One such approach is robot-assisted rehabilitation, which incorporates robotic technologies into the rehabilitation processes. Several well-known robot-assisted movement therapies for the upper limb has been implemented clinically, including MIT-Manus (Krebs et al., 1998), Bi-Manu-Track (Hesse et al., 2003), BATRAC (Cauraugh et al., 2010), and MIME (Burgar et al., 2000), each of which follows different movement therapy theories. Regarding the body parts that are mainly involved in therapy, Bi-Manu-Track focuses on the bilateral forearms and wrists, while BATRAC and MIME focus on the shoulder and elbow of the affected limb. Regarding the movement dimension, BATRAC involves movement in one-dimension, while MIME allows three-dimensional movement. In fact, the higher the degrees of freedom adopted during the movement therapy, the more complex is the design of the robotic device. As a result, it has become important to come up with a feasible design that fulfills the patient’s rehabilitation needs while avoiding the high costs that can be associated with instrument acquirement and maintenance. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the system needs to be comparable to that provided by conventional therapies so that a motivation to pursue this therapeutic option can be established (Kwakkel et al., 2008; Lo et al., 2010).

As an approach to the development of mechanical rehabilitation devices for hemiplegic upper limbs, Timmermans et al. (2009) proposed that three design domains are required; these were the therapy techniques used, the motivation of the patient, and resulting performance rewards. An online survey of physical therapists, 233 in total, indicated that a preferred upper limb robotic device needs to accommodate different hand movements, to be able to be used while in a seated position, to be able to provide the user with feedback, to focus on the restoration of activities of daily living, to able to be used at home, to have adjustable resistance levels and to cost less than US$6,000 (Lu et al., 2011).

In terms of usability, the interaction between the user and the machine tends to be overlooked during the development stage. Although a variety of upper limb rehabilitation machines have been proposed, only a few have been commercialized. This low market acceptance can be attributed to the high cost of these devices, safety concerns, and poor usability (Lee et al., 2005). To this end, the aim of this study was to design a bilateral upper limb rehabilitation device called MirrorPath for the rehabilitation of stroke patients that follows the theories of bilateral movement therapy and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF). These two theories were initially developed by Knott and Kabat and have been shown to have a positive effect on the range of active and passive motions needed by stroke patients (Sharman et al., 2006). Our device will guide the patient’s upper limbs, each of which moves along a diagonal motion path on the horizontal plane. The position and velocity of motion of the bilateral limbs are perfectly mirrored across the midline on the table. Finally, usability testing was conducted on the completed prototype.

Continue —>  Frontiers | An Evaluation of the Design and Usability of a Novel Robotic Bilateral Arm Rehabilitation Device for Patients with Stroke | Frontiers in Neurorobotics

Figure 2. (A) A patient performed bilateral diagonal movements using the device; (B) due to weakness of right upper limb, the patient’s grip was assisted with an elastic bandage, and the patient’s elbow was support by a sling; (C) the application scenario.

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[ARTICLE] Robot Assisted Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke (RATULS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Loss of arm function is a common and distressing consequence of stroke. We describe the protocol for a pragmatic, multicentre randomised controlled trial to determine whether robot-assisted training improves upper limb function following stroke.

Methods/design

Study design: a pragmatic, three-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial, economic analysis and process evaluation.

Setting: NHS stroke services.

Participants: adults with acute or chronic first-ever stroke (1 week to 5 years post stroke) causing moderate to severe upper limb functional limitation.

Randomisation groups:

1. Robot-assisted training using the InMotion robotic gym system for 45 min, three times/week for 12 weeks

2. Enhanced upper limb therapy for 45 min, three times/week for 12 weeks

3. Usual NHS care in accordance with local clinical practice

Randomisation: individual participant randomisation stratified by centre, time since stroke, and severity of upper limb impairment.

Primary outcome: upper limb function measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 3 months post randomisation.

Secondary outcomes: upper limb impairment (Fugl-Meyer Test), activities of daily living (Barthel ADL Index), quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, EQ-5D-5L), resource use, cost per quality-adjusted life year and adverse events, at 3 and 6 months.

Blinding: outcomes are undertaken by blinded assessors.

Economic analysis: micro-costing and economic evaluation of interventions compared to usual NHS care. A within-trial analysis, with an economic model will be used to extrapolate longer-term costs and outcomes.

Process evaluation: semi-structured interviews with participants and professionals to seek their views and experiences of the rehabilitation that they have received or provided, and factors affecting the implementation of the trial.

Sample size: allowing for 10% attrition, 720 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in successful outcome between each of the treatment pairs. Successful outcome definition: baseline ARAT 0–7 must improve by 3 or more points; baseline ARAT 8–13 improve by 4 or more points; baseline ARAT 14–19 improve by 5 or more points; baseline ARAT 20–39 improve by 6 or more points.

Discussion

The results from this trial will determine whether robot-assisted training improves upper limb function post stroke.

Background

Stroke is the commonest cause of complex adult disability in high-income countries [1]. Loss of arm function affects 69% of people who have a stroke [2]. Only 12% of people with arm weakness at the onset of stroke make a full recovery [3]. Improving arm function has been identified as a research priority by stroke survivors, carers and health professionals who report that current rehabilitation pays insufficient attention to arm recovery [4].

Robot-assisted training enables a greater number of repetitive tasks to be practised in a consistent and controllable manner. Repetitive task training is known to drive Hebbian plasticity, where wiring of pathways that are coincidently active is strengthened [5, 6]. A dose of greater than 20 h of repetitive task training improves upper limb motor recovery following a stroke [7] and, therefore, robot-assisted training has the potential to improve arm motor recovery after stroke. We anticipate that Hebbian neuroplasticity, which is learning dependent, will operate regardless of the post-stroke phase.

A Cochrane systematic review of electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training after stroke reported outcomes from a total of 1160 patients who participated in 34 randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Improvements in arm function (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.35, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.18–0.51) and activities of daily living (SMD 0.37, 95% CI, 0.11–0.64) were found in patients who received this treatment, but studies were often of low quality [8]. In the UK there is currently insufficient evidence to justify the use of this technology in routine clinical practice.

In addition, studies which suggest that robot-assisted training may improve upper limb function after stroke should be treated with caution as participants who were randomised to receive robot-assisted training may have also received an increased intensity of rehabilitation sessions (e.g. frequency or duration) compared to participants in the control groups. Greater intensity of upper limb rehabilitation sessions has been shown to improve upper limb functional outcomes [7], and a meta-analysis of robot-assisted training RCTs reported that if control group therapy sessions were delivered at the same frequency and duration, there was no additional functional improvement [9]. Studies are required which provide further direct evidence of the effectiveness of robot-assisted training without the confounding effect of therapy dose.

The aim of the Robot Assisted Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke (RATULS) trial is to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of robot-assisted training compared to an upper limb therapy programme of the same frequency and duration, and usual post-stroke care.

The null hypothesis is that there is no difference in upper limb function at 3 months between study participants who receive robot-assisted training and those who receive an enhanced upper limb therapy programme and those who receive usual post-stroke care. The RATULS trial will be making comparisons of the effectiveness of rehabilitation on upper limb function between all three pairs of trial arms.

Source: Robot Assisted Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke (RATULS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial | Trials | Full Text

 

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[VIDEO] Pablo Product Film – YouTube

Δημοσιεύτηκε στις 18 Ιουλ 2017

The PABLO is the latest in a long row of clinically tried and tested robotic- and computer-assisted therapy devices for arms and hands. The new design and the specially developed tyroS software make the PABLO more flexible and offer an expanded spectrum of therapy options.

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[ARTICLE] Home-based neurologic music therapy for arm hemiparesis following stroke: results from a pilot, feasibility randomized controlled trial – Full Text

 

Continue —> Home-based neurologic music therapy for arm hemiparesis following stroke: results from a pilot, feasibility randomized controlled trialClinical Rehabilitation – Alexander J Street, Wendy L Magee, Andrew Bateman, Michael Parker, Helen Odell-Miller, Jorg Fachner, 2017

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Figure 1. Study flow diagram. Data collection occurred at weeks 1, 6, 9, 15 and 18. Cross-over analysis required data from weeks 1, 6, 9 and 15.

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[BLOG POST] Home After a Stroke: Reviewing Virtual Reality Rehab

Between September 2011 and May 2017 Dean published 173 posts about the use of virtual reality to provide rehab for stroke survivors.  The results for the hand are depressing.  For six years research focused on a subject’s ability to touch an object on the screen so the computer can move an object or make it disappear.  Enjoying these quick reactions is not enough to justify the cost of this expensive equipment.  It was a good place to start 6 years ago, but progress towards useful gains is disappointing.  Stroke survivors want to manipulate objects with their hand.

There is a glimmer of hope.  Gauthier (1) used video games that make stroke survivors do more than use their shoulder and elbow to reach forward and side to side.  These games require forearm and wrist motions.  This may not sound exciting but these motions orient our hand to the many different positions objects rest in. The photo shows the forearm is halfway between palm up and palm down so the hand can pick up a glass.  Cocking the wrist means the rim of the glass is not pointed at the ceiling but at the person’s mouth.

Unfortunately, Gauthier selected stroke survivors who already had a few degrees of active forearm and wrist movement.  How can subjects make the leap from just reaching to turning their hand palm up to catch a parachute on a video screen?  My OT gave me exercises that helped me regain forearm and wrist motions.  These small motions have made me more independent.  For example, I can turn my hand halfway between palm up and palm down to grab my cane so my sound hand can catch the door before the person in front of me lets it slam shut.  I picture stroke survivors practicing forearm and wrist motions and then immediately trying to turn their hand palm up so they can turn over a card on the computer screen. Fun + repetition is good.
1. Gauthier L, et al. Video game rehabilitation for outpatient stroke (VIGoROUS): protocol for a multi-center comparative effectiveness trial of in-home gamified constraint-induced movement therapy for rehabilitation of chronic upper extremity hemiparesis. BMC Neurology. 2017;17-109. doi:10.1186/s12883-017-0888-0.

Source: Home After a Stroke: Reviewing Virtual Reality Rehab

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[BLOG POST] Which Saebo Hand Rehabilitation Device is Right For You? – Saebo

 


In 2001, two occupational therapists had one goal: to provide neurological clients access to transformative and life-changing products for improving arm and hand function. Frustrated with the current devices on the market that were limited, expensive, and inaccessible for home use, the founders were inspired to create new, revolutionary solutions.

What started as a dream has now become Saebo, a global provider of affordable rehabilitative products designed to improve mobility and function in individuals suffering from neurological and orthopedic conditions. With a vast network of Saebo-trained clinicians spanning six continents, Saebo has helped over 200,000 clients around the globe achieve a new level of independence.

At Saebo, we have three core product lines for hand rehabilitation: The SaeboFlex, SaeboGlove, and SaeboStretch. These three products have helped numerous people overcome limited motor function after suffering a stroke or other neurological or orthopedic condition.

We would love for you to get to know more about these three products and learn about why they work, and more importantly, who they can help. We have committed to making products that are unique and based on the most recent research and evidence available. Learn about three of our unique products:

 

 

SaeboFlex

The SaeboFlex is a high-profile orthosis with an outrigger system that covers the back of hand, fingertips and forearm. This orthosis positions the wrist and fingers into extension to prepare them for object manipulation. With the assistance of the SaeboFlex, the user is able to grasp objects by voluntarily flexing his or her fingers. Once the fingers relax (stop gripping), the extension spring system assists in re-opening the hand to release the object.

Saebo’s functional dynamic orthoses are specifically designed for people suffering from a neurological injury such as a stroke, head injury, and incomplete spinal cord injury. The SaeboFlex gives people the ability to perform grasp-and-release activities, which allows them to participate in task-oriented hand training. Evidence-based research supports this training as critical to recovery. The SaeboFlex is appropriate for individuals with minimal to severe tone/spasticity.

Here is an example of a man trying to pick up a ball six weeks after his stroke with and without the SaeboFlex. You can also see his improvement after six months of training:

SaeboGlove

The SaeboGlove is a low-profile, lightweight glove that helps clients suffering from neurological and orthopedic injuries incorporate their hand functionally in therapy and at home. The proprietary tension system has elastic bands that offer various tensions for individual finger joints. The tension system extends the client’s fingers and thumb following grasping and assists with hand opening.

The ideal candidate for the SaeboGlove is suffering from minimal to no spasticity or contracture. People with more severe soft-tissue shortening would need a high-profile orthosis like the SaeboFlex. For appropriate candidates, the SaeboGlove can be worn to assist with day-to-day functional tasks and during grasp-and-release exercises/activities. This new-found freedom leads to improved motor recovery and functional independence.

This video shows a man attempting grasp-and-release activities with and without the assistance of the SaeboGlove:

SaeboStretch

The SaeboStretch is a soft and adjustable dynamic resting hand splint recognizable for its unique strapping system. This splint is worn to stretch and prevent soft-tissue shortening and helps neurologically impaired clients maintain or improve motion. Saebo’s energy-storing technology allows individuals suffering from spasticity to stretch comfortably and safely, resulting in increased motivation and compliance.

The SaeboStretch is appropriate for people suffering from minimal to moderate spasticity. The orthosis includes the choice of three tension plates that offer various levels of resistance depending on the amount of tone and spasticity the individual has. The flexible hand plates also prevent or minimize joint pain and deformities. The SaeboStretch can be worn during the day or when sleeping.

See how the SaeboStretch is custom fit to the individual in this video:

Our Expert Recommendations

Over the last ten years, Saebo has grown into a leading global provider of rehabilitative products created through the unrelenting leadership and the strong network of clinicians around the world. We are growing this commitment to affordability and accessibility even further by making our newest, most innovative products more available than ever.

If your loved one is recovering from a neurological or orthopedic injury and wants to know if one of Saebo’s products is right for them, take our free 5-minute evaluation. Completing this survey will provide all of the information needed to ensure the best possible product recommendations. Upon completion of your survey, you will receive personalized suggestions tailored to your specific needs and abilities. In addition, our Product Specialists will be happy to review these recommendations with your physician or therapist.


All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Reliance on any information provided by the Saebo website is solely at your own risk.

Source: Which Saebo Hand Rehabilitation Device is Right For You? | Saebo

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[WEB SITE] Regain Use of Arm After Stroke – National Stroke Association

Regain Use of Arm After Stroke
Technology Now Widely Available Means Moderately to Severely Weakened Arms and Hands May Function Again

Experiencing a stroke can be devastating.  Many are left with an arm so weak it seems useless.  The biggest loss can be your independence.

But for many, regaining use of your arm and hand and your independence is possible.  Myomo, a medical robotics company, has developed the MyoPro—a lightweight, non-invasive powered brace (orthosis). It is the only orthosis that, sensing a patient’s own neurological signals through sensors on the surface of the skin, can restore their ability to use their arms and hands so that they can return to work, live independently and reduce their cost of care.

Hundreds of patients have used it successfully.  It is recommended by clinicians at leading rehabilitation facilities and 20 VA hospitals. (MyoPro is not for everyone and your results may vary.)

Read the whitepaper Technology Giving Hope to Stroke Patients Now Widely Available and see videos of patients and physicians describing their experience with MyoPro.

LEARN MORE

Source: National Stroke Association

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[ARTICLE] Short- and Long-term Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Upper Limb Motor Function after Stroke: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis – Full Text

The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term effects as well as other parameters of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on upper limb motor functional recovery after stroke.

The databases of PubMed, Medline, Science Direct, Cochrane, and Embase were searched for randomized controlled studies reporting effects of rTMS on upper limb motor recovery published before October 30, 2016.

The short- and long-term mean effect sizes as well as the effect size of rTMS frequency of pulse, post-stroke onset, and theta burst stimulation patterns were summarized by calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) and the 95% confidence interval using fixed/random effect models as appropriate.

Thirty-four studies with 904 participants were included in this systematic review. Pooled estimates show that rTMS significantly improved short-term (SMD, 0.43; P < 0.001) and long-term (SMD, 0.49; P < 0.001) manual dexterity. More pronounced effects were found for rTMS administered in the acute phase of stroke (SMD, 0.69), subcortical stroke (SMD, 0.66), 5-session rTMS treatment (SMD, 0.67) and intermittent theta burst stimulation (SMD, 0.60). Only three studies reported mild adverse events such as headache and increased anxiety .

Five-session rTMS treatment could best improve stroke-induced upper limb dyskinesia acutely and in a long-lasting manner. Intermittent theta burst stimulation is more beneficial than continuous theta burst stimulation. rTMS applied in the acute phase of stroke is more effective than rTMS applied in the chronic phase. Subcortical lesion benefit more from rTMS than other lesion site.

Continue —> Short- and Long-term Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Upper Limb Motor Function after Stroke: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis – Feb 17, 2017

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Figure 1. The flow diagram of the selection process.

 

 

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[WEB SITE] Stroke Recovery Exercises for Your Whole Body – Saebo

Stroke survival rates have improved a lot over the last few years. Stroke was once the third leading cause of death in the United States, but it fell to fourth place in 2008 and fifth place in 2013. Today, strokes claim an average of 129,000 American lives every year. Reducing stroke deaths in America is a great improvement, but we still have a long way to go in improving the lives of stroke survivors.

Stagnant recovery rates and low quality of life for stroke survivors are unfortunately very common. Just 10% of stroke survivors make a full recovery. Only 25% of all survivors recover with minor impairments. Nearly half of all stroke survivors continue to live with serious impairments requiring special care, and 10% of survivors live in nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, and other long-term healthcare facilities. It’s easy to see why stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. By 2030, it’s estimated that there could be up to 11 million stroke survivors in the country.

Traditionally, stroke rehabilitation in America leaves much to be desired in terms of recovery and quality of life. There is a serious gap between stroke patients being discharged and transitioning to physical recovery programs. In an effort to improve recovery and quality of life, the American Heart Association has urged the healthcare community to prioritize exercise as an essential part of post-stroke care.

Unfortunately, too few healthcare professionals prescribe exercise as a form of therapy for stroke, despite its many benefits for patients. Many stroke survivors are not given the skills, confidence, knowledge, or tools necessary to follow an exercise program. However, that can change.

With the right recovery programs that prioritize exercise for rehabilitation, stroke survivors can “relearn” crucial motors skills to regain a high quality of life. Thanks to a phenomenon known as neuroplasticity, even permanent brain damage doesn’t make disability inevitable.

A stroke causes loss of physical function because it temporarily or permanently damages the parts of the brain responsible for those functions. The same damage is also responsible for behavioral and cognitive changes, which range from memory and vision problems to severe depression and anger. Each of these changes correspond to a specific region of the brain that was damaged due to stroke.

For example, damage in the left hemisphere of your brain will cause weakness and paralysis on the right side of your body. If a stroke damages or kills brain cells in the right hemisphere, you may struggle to understand facial cues or control your behavior. However, brain damage due to stroke is not necessarily permanent.

For more Visit Site —> Stroke Recovery Exercises for Your Whole Body

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