Posts Tagged Assistive devices

[Abstract] Applying a soft-robotic glove as assistive device and training tool with games to support hand function after stroke: Preliminary results on feasibility and potential clinical impact

Abstract

Recent technological developments regarding wearable soft-robotic devices extend beyond the current application of rehabilitation robotics and enable unobtrusive support of the arms and hands during daily activities. In this light, the HandinMind (HiM) system was developed, comprising a soft-robotic, grip supporting glove with an added computer gaming environment. The present study aims to gain first insight into the feasibility of clinical application of the HiM system and its potential impact. In order to do so, both the direct influence of the HiM system on hand function as assistive device and its therapeutic potential, of either assistive or therapeutic use, were explored. A pilot randomized clinical trial was combined with a cross-sectional measurement (comparing performance with and without glove) at baseline in 5 chronic stroke patients, to investigate both the direct assistive and potential therapeutic effects of the HiM system. Extended use of the soft-robotic glove as assistive device at home or with dedicated gaming exercises in a clinical setting was applicable and feasible. A positive assistive effect of the soft-robotic glove was proposed for pinch strength and functional task performance `lifting full cans’ in most of the five participants. A potential therapeutic impact was suggested with predominantly improved hand strength in both participants with assistive use, and faster functional task performance in both participants with therapeutic application.

I. Introduction

Neurorehabilitation research has shown that training programs for patients after stroke should ideally consist of high intensity, task-specific and functional exercises with active contribution of the patient, to have the best chance for improving arm/hand function [1], [2]. Conventional rehabilitation involves predominantly one-to-one attention of a therapist for each patient, which is a challenge when aiming to provide high intensity training and involves high costs [3], [4]. This is impeded further by an increased ageing of the population, associated with a higher prevalence of stroke patients and less healthcare professionals available to provide such intensive training.

 

via Applying a soft-robotic glove as assistive device and training tool with games to support hand function after stroke: Preliminary results on feasibility and potential clinical impact – IEEE Conference Publication

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[BOOK] Atlas of Orthoses and Assistive Devices E-Book – Google Books

 

Front Cover
Elsevier Health SciencesNov 24, 2017 – Medical – 672 pages

Advances in the material sciences, 3D printing technology, functional electrical stimulation, smart devices and apps, FES technology, sensors and microprocessor technologies, and more have lately transformed the field of orthotics, making the prescription of these devices more complex than ever beforeAtlas of Orthoses and Assistive Devices, 5th Edition, brings you completely up to date with these changes, helping physiatrists, orthopaedic surgeons, prosthetists, orthotists, and other rehabilitative specialists work together to select the appropriate orthotic device for optimal results in every patient.

 

 

via Atlas of Orthoses and Assistive Devices E-Book – Joseph Webster, Douglas Murphy – Google Books

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[Abstract] Applying a soft-robotic glove as assistive device and training tool with games to support hand function after stroke: Preliminary results on feasibility and potential clinical impact

Published in: Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR), 2017 International Conference on

Abstract:

Recent technological developments regarding wearable soft-robotic devices extend beyond the current application of rehabilitation robotics and enable unobtrusive support of the arms and hands during daily activities. In this light, the HandinMind (HiM) system was developed, comprising a soft-robotic, grip supporting glove with an added computer gaming environment. The present study aims to gain first insight into the feasibility of clinical application of the HiM system and its potential impact. In order to do so, both the direct influence of the HiM system on hand function as assistive device and its therapeutic potential, of either assistive or therapeutic use, were explored. A pilot randomized clinical trial was combined with a cross-sectional measurement (comparing performance with and without glove) at baseline in 5 chronic stroke patients, to investigate both the direct assistive and potential therapeutic effects of the HiM system. Extended use of the soft-robotic glove as assistive device at home or with dedicated gaming exercises in a clinical setting was applicable and feasible. A positive assistive effect of the soft-robotic glove was proposed for pinch strength and functional task performance ‘lifting full cans’ in most of the five participants. A potential therapeutic impact was suggested with predominantly improved hand strength in both participants with assistive use, and faster functional task performance in both participants with therapeutic application.

Source: Applying a soft-robotic glove as assistive device and training tool with games to support hand function after stroke: Preliminary results on feasibility and potential clinical impact – IEEE Xplore Document

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[BLOG POST] Essential Devices for Adapting the Home After Stroke

Strokes affect everybody differently, leaving victims to live with a variety of challenging physical and cognitive conditions. Many factors need to be considered when managing stroke recovery: damaged parts of the brain, severity of injuries, numbness or weakness of the body, loss of motor skills, extreme fatigue.

The problems seem overwhelming, but victims can move forward. With love, support, and hope, a stroke survivor has the potential to successfully regain independence. By implementing safety precautions at home, changes in lifestyle, and utilizing adaptive equipment, a victim can improve their rehabilitation and maintain self-sufficiency.

 

Living at Home After a Stroke

For someone who has suffered a minor stroke, returning home and recovering is simpler than it is for those affected by more severe stroke consequences. If you or a loved one faces significant injuries, achieving independence at home relies on several factors.

Taking Care of Yourself

Perhaps the most important factor of all, rehabilitation at home entails carrying out daily fundamental tasks. This includes feeding yourself, toileting, changing clothes regularly, strengthening movement and communication skills, and maintaining good hygiene.

Taking Medications on Time

Along with performing basic tasks, it’s important to follow medical advice and prescriptions. Making sure to take medications as prescribed and perform other medical regiments, will greatly decrease the chances of having another stroke, as well as reduce issues after suffering from one.

Having a Caregiver

Giving you full-time attention and support, a caregiver is a tremendous way to rebuild confidence and reclaim independence. A caregiver can assist with maintaining daily routines, taking medications, and being a source of moral support throughout the recovery period.

Home Adaptability

Safety always comes first, and if recovery is taking place in the home, then certain precautions must be taken to ensure proper rehabilitation. The first step is to take away anything that could be a potential hazard, such as loose carpets, electrical cords, or clutter. Open space is best for patients as they set up to move around the home. Clearing out unnecessary objects will allow open pathways to and from different parts of the house. If mobility is a greater concern, handrails and transfer benches can be installed to promote a greater and safer self-reliance.

It’s important to contact a healthcare team to determine whether moving home is the right fit for a survivor after a stroke. It is always a good idea to discuss the options of recovery and determining which kinds of adaptive equipment and home modifications will help most. Below is a general guide to assistive devices that will be helpful to the average stroke survivor.

Best Assistive Devices

Best Bathroom Assistive Devices

Grab Rails

Install rails to provide support when transferring in and out of the bath or shower. The type needed will depend on the patient’s limitations and safety concerns.To make your selection easier, here is a comprehensive guide to review:http://www.dlf.org.uk/factsheets/grab-rails#6.

 

Slip-Resistant Mats

Slip-resistant mats are mats that are fitted to the bottom of a shower or tub and have self-adhesive capabilities to lower the chances of slipping. They are perfect for someone with decreased balance, difficulty with standing or sitting and limited safety awareness. Make sure to refrain from using any kind of oils and other liquids that could prevent the mat from sticking.

more —> Essential Devices for Adapting the Home After Stroke | Saebo

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[Literature Overview] EBRSR – 9 Mobility and the Lower Extremity – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Rehabilitation techniques of sensorimotor complications post stroke fall loosely into one of two categories; the compensatory approach or the restorative approach. While some overlap exists, the underlying philosophies of care are what set them apart. The goal of the compensatory approach towards treatment is not necessarily on improving motor recovery or reducing impairments but rather on teaching patients a new skill, even if it only involves pragmatically using the non-involved side (Gresham et al. 1995). The restorative approach focuses on traditional physical therapy exercises and neuromuscular facilitation, which involves sensorimotor stimulation, exercises and resistance training, designed to enhance motor recovery and maximize brain recovery of the neurological impairment (Gresham et al. 1995).In this review, rehabilitation of mobility and lower extremity complications is assessed. An overview of literature pertaining to the compensatory approach and the restorative approach is provided. Treatment targets discussed include balance retraining, gait retraining, strength training, cardiovascular conditioning and treatment of contractures in the lower extremities. Technologies used to aid rehabilitation include assistive devices, electrical stimulation, and splints.

Full Text PDF (175 pages)

 

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[BOOK] New Trends in Medical and Service Robots: Assistive, Surgical and Educational Robotics – Google Books

Front CoverMedical and Service Robotics integrate the most recent achievements in mechanics, mechatronics, computer science, haptic and teleoperation devices together with adaptive control algorithms.

The book includes topics such as surgery robotics, assist devices, rehabilitation technology, surgical instrumentation and Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) as examples for medical robotics.  Autonomous cleaning, tending, logistics, surveying and rescue robots, and elderly and healthcare robots are typical examples of topics from service robotics.

This is the Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Medical and Service Robots, held in Lausanne, Switzerland in 2014. It presents an overview of current research directions and fields of interest. It is divided into three sections, namely

  1. assistive and rehabilitation devices;
  2. surgical robotics; and
  3. educational and service robotics.

Most contributions are strongly anchored on collaborations between technical and medical actors, engineers, surgeons and clinicians. Biomedical robotics and the rapidly growing service automation fields have clearly overtaken the “classical” industrial robotics and automatic control centered activity familiar to the older generation of roboticists.

Source: New Trends in Medical and Service Robots: Assistive, Surgical and … – Google Books

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[ARTICLE] User-centred input for a wearable soft-robotic glove supporting hand function in daily life

Abstract

Many stroke patients and elderly have a reduced hand function, resulting in difficulties with independently performing activities of daily living (ADL). Assistive technology is a promising alternative to support the upper limb in performing ADL. To avoid device abandonment, end-users should be involved early in the design and development phase to identify user requirements for assistive technology.

The present study applies a user-centred approach to identify user requirements for wearable soft-robotic gloves targeted at physical support of hand function during ADL for elderly and stroke patients.

Elderly, stroke patients and healthcare professionals, participating in focus groups, specified requirements regarding:

  1. activities that need support of assistive technology,
  2. design of wearable robotic devices for hand support, and
  3. application of assistive technology as training tool at home.

Assistive technology for the support of the hand is considered valuable by users for assisting ADL, but only if the device is wearable, compact, lightweight, easy to use, quickly initialized, washable and only supports the particular function(s) that an individual need(s) assistance with, without taking over existing function(s) from the user.

Source: IEEE Xplore Abstract – User-centred input for a wearable soft-robotic glove supporting hand function in daily life

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