Posts Tagged brain injury

[BLOG POST] The Importance of Having a Support Network After A Brain Injury and What To Do If You Don’t Have One

May 2, 2019,Alphabet Brains

In the early days of brain surgery/brain injury having a support network is such an important thing but what do we do once once the bandage comes off? Once the scar heals to the best of its ability and once we start to look ok to that support network? Well, they get back to living their lives and that’s ok. However, we are now left in this new isolating world where we’re not sure what’s happening to us. A world where we’ll soon come to learn that we now live with life long hidden problems.

If you’re one of those people that has a support network after the early days you may still struggle with the feeling of isolation and that’s ok. Brain injury is such a traumatic thing to happen and can change you in such a way that you do see the world as if you’re the only one that understands what you’re going through.

I feel that you don’t truly understand a brain injury until you have one. 

In this blog post I’d like to share some advice on support networks, the different kinds and what to do if you don’t have one.

Asking for a support network

(I live in England so I’m not sure how it works in other countries, but you can browse some Useful Links that I’ve found)

Go to your GP and ask to be referred to a local Brain Injury centre or a neuropsychiatrist. You have to say neuropsychiatrist because they’re very different to a psychiatrist, neuropsychiatrists know a lot about brain injury and the emotional side effects. They’ll give you coping mechanisms, teach you about the part of your brain that you’ve damaged and the knock on effect that’s had on you.

Headway Groups

In England, Headway are very good. They have a variety of groups you can go to and you’ll get to meet other people with a brain injury. Find your local one here, you just have to enter your postcode, contact the one closest to you and they’ll arrange to meet you so they can learn more about you and your needs.

Friends and Family as a support network

Having friends and family as a support network can be isolating, depending on how much you see them, how much they really know about your brain injury and it can also depend on just how busy they are with their own lives. Try to update them as much as you can, it’ll let them know how you are and make you feel less alone. From my experience though, I suggest getting professional help if you can. Having an outsider is always better because you have someone who knows about brain injury, someone you can say anything to without fear of being judged, someone who can give you practical advice and coping skills with day-to-day life.

I have one friend that truly understands brain injury because he also has a brain injury, but we’re not friends because of our brain injury. (Be careful with that, don’t just be friends with someone because they have a brain injury, it’s not a healthy relationship) We’re friends because we have things in common, the same sense of humour and can talk for hours. We became friends because of our situation; we both work at Headway Glasgow, we both have brain injuries and on a work night out we bonded over the dark humour surrounding our injuries. Because you have to laugh. The others who were with us didn’t seem to think it was funny, but they don’t have a brain injury… So, sometimes having a support network is having a friend that has a brain injury, but make sure you get on with them outside of your brain injury as well. That’s what we did and now we don’t talk much about our brain injuries, we can if we need to but we both know that professional help is much better, especially after not having any for so long.

The little things

Having a support network doesn’t have to big things like the things I’ve mentioned above because you might not need something big right now or even ever.

It can be little things such as having people in your life that:

  • Understand you need a quiet table when you go out.
  • Will listen to you when you need to talk.
  • Will ask how you are.
  • Support your passions and hobbies, because that improves your mood.

What and how is your support network doing? Let me know by commenting below, tweeting me, visiting me on instagram or visit the facebook page.

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[BLOG POST] Sleep Evaluation and Treatment Support Patient Outcome

(Note:  In this guest blog from Grace Griesbach, Ph.D., and CNS’ National Director of Clinical Research, she explains that proper sleep is a vital component in the rehabilitation of brain injury).

Historically, quotes referring to sleep have been associated with well-being. This is not without substance. The importance of sleep is appreciated when one considers that it is observed across the vast majority of animal species. In humans and other higher mammals, lack of sleep has been demonstrated to impact physical, cognitive and emotional functions negatively. Physical consequences of sleep deprivation include compromised immune responses, as well as hormonal and metabolic alterations that in turn will impact overall health. Sleep also promotes emotional and psychological well-being. As for cognitive functions, sleep has been shown to facilitate learning and memory.

Moreover, animal studies have shown that neural plasticity changes allow for better memory to occur during sleep. Sleep driven neural plasticity is also evident during brain development and during times when healing is necessary. Given the multiple functions of sleep, it is evident that sleep-related problems should not be ignored.

Unfortunately, the prevalence of sleep disorders following brain injury is notably higher compared to the general population. Many of those that have endured a traumatic brain injury or stroke have difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep. Daytime sleepiness (hypersomnia) and fatigue are frequently reported complaints that are associated with insomnia. Apnea, a common breathing-related sleep disorder, is frequently observed during the chronic brain injury period. Apnea is defined as breathing cessation for fixed periods during sleep and contributes to arousals throughout the night; promoting fragmented sleep.

Sleep follows a particular overnight pattern consisting of repeated sleep cycles. Each cycle is comprised of one rapid eye movement (REM) stage and three non-REM stages. These stages are defined by different brain activity patterns that have been associated with particular physiological and neural plasticity processes.

Studies focused on proper sleep closely examine brain wave activity and body physiology throughout the various sleep stages. Some stages are particularly important for memory, emotional well-being, and cognitive function, and may be compromised by interrupted sleep. The golden standard of evaluating sleep is with an overnight polysomnography study performed by a certified sleep technologist. The technologist places electrodes on the scalp of the patient to record brain activity. Breathing, heart rate, oxygen levels, and limb movement are also recorded during sleep. Results from these recordings are sent to a board-certified sleep medicine physician, who creates a report on the diagnosis and a treatment plan.

Centre for Neuro Skills (CNS) offers a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to rehabilitation. This entails addressing key factors that impact recovery such as sleep. CNS has opened sleep laboratories within the residential buildings of our programs in Dallas, Texas and Bakersfield, California. All CNS facilities can arrange for a sleep evaluation at one of the labs, based on a patient’s needs and treatment plan. Sleep evaluations of CNS patients allow for the detection of sleep-related issues that are likely to hinder recovery. CNS sleep facilities also provide research opportunities to deepen understanding of sleep-related issues after brain injury. Findings from these studies will help improve treatment and develop new therapeutic strategies.

 

via Sleep Evaluation and Treatment Support Patient Outcome – Neuro Landscape

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[WEB SITE] Traumatic Brain Injury Resource Guide – Brain Injury News Feb 1, 2018 to April 5, 2019

Brain Injury News

Date Title
04/05/2019 Mental health issues often progress after brain injury
04/04/2019 Head injuries in soccer
04/03/2019 Researchers discover gene suppressing stroke and brain injury recovery
04/02/2019 8 Warning Signs That a Stroke Is Coming On – Look for Little Things
04/01/2019 Near-infrared energy used as therapy during recovery of traumatic brain injury
03/29/2019 Behavioral markers of recovery of consciousness after severe brain injury
03/28/2019 These concussion-preventing bike helmets mimic the brain’s protective fluid
03/27/2019 Scientists discover unique tau filament structures in head-injury associated dementia
03/26/2019 New study reshapes understanding of how the brain recovers from injury
03/25/2019 Fewer boys are suffering head injuries, but rate rises for girls
03/22/2019 Risk of attempted suicide among adolescents and young adults with traumatic brain injury
03/21/2019 Mild traumatic brain injury and psychopathology in adolescence
03/20/2019 New traumatic brain injury blood test approved by FDA
03/19/2019 Football, soccer lead to the most brain injuries in kids
03/18/2019 New approach to stroke treatment could minimize brain damage
03/15/2019 Researchers outline the role of a deep brain structure in concussion
03/14/2019 Scientists teach machines to predict recovery time from sports-related concussions
03/13/2019 The contribution of social support, professional support, and financial hardship to family caregiver life satisfaction after traumatic brain injury
03/12/2019 Decreased risk of dementia among patients with traumatic brain injury receiving acupuncture treatment
03/11/2019 Cognitive reserve protects against memory decrements associated with neuropathology
03/08/2019 Brain injury rampant among domestic violence survivors
03/07/2019 Estimated life-time savings in the cost of ongoing care following specialist rehabilitation for severe traumatic brain injury
03/06/2019 Should we assess pituitary function in children after a mild traumatic brain injury?
03/05/2019 Global outcome trajectories up to 10 years after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury
03/04/2019 Sex differences in traumatic brain injury
03/01/2019 Factors contributing to parent-child interaction quality following mild traumatic brain injury in early childhood
02/28/2019 March is brain injury awareness month
02/27/2019 Brain injuries in women prisoners are linked to mental illness and reoffending
02/26/2019 Nixing neuron receptor improves recovery from brain injury
02/25/2019 Blood test being developed to better diagnose traumatic brain injuries
02/22/2019 Alcohol has a dose-dependent effect on the outcomes of traumatic brain injury patients
02/21/2019 ‘I hit my head.’ Let’s talk about traumatic brain injury
02/20/2019 Amantadine may be effective treatment for headaches after traumatic brain injury
02/19/2019 Traumatic brain injuries linked to epilepsy development
02/18/2019 Amantadine may be effective treatment for headaches after traumatic brain injury
02/15/2019 New study shows chronic head injuries lead to mental health issues
02/14/2019 Pill that reverses brain damage could be on the horizon
02/13/2019 Association of concussion with the risk of suicide
02/12/2019 Drug combo makes neurons to replace damaged ones
02/11/2019 Nearly 65% of prisoners at women’s jail ‘show signs of brain injury’
02/08/2019 Concussed adolescent athletes ‘prescribed’ aerobic exercise recovered faster
02/07/2019 New monitoring software suggests sub-concussive blows cause brain function changes
02/06/2019 Cancer drug shows promise in mitigating concussive brain injuries
02/05/2019 Mild traumatic brain injury linked to higher risk of PTSD, depression
02/04/2019 Wrestling with uncertainty after mild traumatic brain injury
02/01/2019 The frequency and the diagnosis of pituitary dysfunction after traumatic brain injury
01/31/2019 Self-awareness following a traumatic brain injury in childhood
01/30/2019 Concussion and its consequences
01/29/2019 Pharmacotherapy effectiveness in treating depression after traumatic brain injury
01/28/2019 Pituitary dysfunction due to sports-related traumatic brain injury
01/25/2019 How concussions may lead to epilepsy
01/24/2019 Quality of life in adolescents recovering from sports-related concussion
01/23/2019 Smartphone app that can rapidly monitor the brain for signs of concussion
01/22/2019 Brain vital signs capture undetected impairments in ice hockey players with concussions
01/21/2019 Life after my traumatic brain injury will never be the same again, but I’m taking it one step at a time
01/18/2019 Traumatic brain injury and psychiatric co-morbidity
01/17/2019 Employment probability trajectories up to 10 years after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury
01/16/2019 Sleep-wake disturbances in childhood traumatic brain injury
01/15/2019 Predictors of community integration following traumatic brain injury
01/14/2019 Moderate to severe gambling problems and traumatic brain injury
01/11/2019 Behavioral therapies may treat headache and post-concussive symptoms
01/10/2019 Childhood socioeconomic status predicts cognitive outcomes across adulthood following traumatic brain injury
01/09/2019 Prevalence of medical and psychiatric comorbidities following traumatic brain injury
01/08/2019 Forget baseline tests, eye-tracking brings greater clarity to concussion diagnosis
01/07/2019 Effect of low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on depression and cognition of patients with traumatic brain injury
01/04/2019 I suffered from 2 traumatic brain injuries, but it took 13 years to get a diagnosis
01/03/2019 Traumatic brain injury bill set to become federal law
01/02/2019 Are traumatic brain injuries associated with criminality after taking account of childhood family Social Status and Disruptive Behaviors?
12/31/2018 Tackle football poses a grave risk to young athletes
12/28/2018 Intimate partner violence and traumatic brain injury: An “invisible” public health epidemic
12/27/2018 Effects of cerebrolysin on functional outcome of patients with traumatic brain injury
12/26/2018 Understanding repetitive head impacts in sports
12/21/2018 Researchers find lasting impact of concussions on young adults
12/20/2018 Computers determine states of consciousness
12/19/2018 Study makes significant findings related to traumatic brain injury
12/18/2018 There may be a surprising link between depression and concussions in kids who play football
12/17/2018 A new strategy for brain regeneration after stroke
12/14/2018 Dialysis patients at risk of progressive brain injury
12/13/2018 Experts address sleep disorders following traumatic brain injury
12/12/2018 ‘Before, I was quite a shy person’: life after brain damage
12/11/2018 Rethinking treatment of traumatic brain injuries among children with disabilities
12/10/2018 Rural youth with mild head injuries face higher medical costs but get less care
12/07/2018 Kids with concussions can phase in exercise, screen time sooner than before
12/06/2018 Youth football changes nerve fibers in brain
12/05/2018 Commonly used concussion test useful in confirming—but not making—diagnosis for pro athletes
12/04/2018 Brain changes seen in MRIs of young football players
12/03/2018 How I got my life back on track after a brain injury
11/30/2018 EEG response to speech identifies severe brain injury patients with preserved cognition
11/29/2018 The search for a pill that treats concussions
11/28/2018 New way to ID cognitively aware yet unresponsive people with severe brain injury
11/27/2018 Head injuries lead to serious brain diseases- Here’s all you need to know
11/26/2018 Reprogrammed cells could tackle brain damage
11/21/2018 Suicide after concussion rare, but risk is higher
11/20/2018 New concussion recommendations for kids
11/19/2018 Researchers find further link between a-fib, brain injury, and possible neurodegeneration
11/16/2018 Mild blast forces cause brain pathology and deficits, despite lack of macroscopic damage
11/15/2018 Blood test may one day help track concussion recovery
11/14/2018 One type of brain cell might hold key to inflammation after head injury
11/13/2018 Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers mark 30 years of research
11/12/2018 New research shows symptom improvement after concussion in children varies
11/09/2018 Good sleep quality encourages better recovery after sport-related concussion
11/08/2018 Traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-term neurological and psychiatric disorders
11/07/2018 Evidence of brain injuries present in football players at young ages
11/06/2018 Socioeconomic status affects outcomes after traumatic brain injury
11/05/2018 Transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of depression in a patient with traumatic brain injury
11/02/2018 Changes in growth factor levels over a 7-day period predict the functional outcomes of traumatic brain injury
11/01/2018 pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury
10/31/2018 Gender differences in employment and economic quality of life following traumatic brain injury
10/30/2018 Concussion and college football: how many hits to the head is too much?
10/29/2018 Cerebral atrophy following traumatic brain injury
10/26/2018 Globally recognised treatment to cool the brain after a head injury does not reduce the risk of permanent damage
10/25/2018 Feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms underlie the relationship between traumatic brain injury and gut microbiota
10/24/2018 With dangers of everyday concussions revealed, scientists race to find solutions
10/23/2018 Sleep disruption following mild traumatic brain injury
10/22/2018 Quality of life and symptom burden 1 month after concussion in children and adolescents
10/19/2018 A systematic review and meta-analysis of return to work after mild Traumatic brain injury
10/18/2018 Kids’ concussion symptoms may persist for a year
10/17/2018 Sugar, a “sweet” tool to understand brain injuries
10/16/2018 Neck device shows promise in protecting the brain of female soccer players
10/15/2018 Patterns of pituitary dysfunction three months or more after traumatic brain injury
10/12/2018 Are eyes a window to diagnosing acute concussion in youth?
10/11/2018 Scientists design new methodology of motor assessment for patients with acquired brain injury
10/10/2018 Every cell has a story to tell in brain injury
10/09/2018 Concussion history and cognitive function
10/08/2018 Traumatic brain injury as an independent risk factor for problem gambling
10/05/2018 Prevalence of TBI 2.5 percent among U.S. children
10/04/2018 What happens to the brain after a traumatic injury?
10/03/2018 Researchers discover possible cause for Alzheimer’s and traumatic brain injury
10/02/2018 Neurobehavioral symptoms predictive of employment outcome after traumatic brain injury
10/01/2018 White matter repair and traumatic brain injury
09/28/2018 1 in 6 Americans over 40 has been knocked unconscious
09/27/2018 Traumatic brain injury as an independent risk factor for problem gambling
09/26/2018 New attention being paid to emotional toll of traumatic brain injuries
09/25/2018 Brain recovery: Activity, not rest, may speed recovery after brain injury
09/24/2018 Researchers find children experience concussion symptoms three times longer than adults
09/21/2018 Life after concussion
09/20/2018 For kids with concussions, less time alone in a dark room
09/19/2018 An improvement in outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury
09/18/2018 Clinical characteristics of patients with bipolar disorder and premorbid traumatic brain injury
09/17/2018 What happens inside an injured brain?
09/14/2018 Outcomes of subjective sleep-wake disturbances 20 years after traumatic brain injury in childhood
09/13/2018 Indicators of long-term return to work after severe traumatic brain injury
09/12/2018 The CDC just released new concussion guidelines for kids
09/11/2018 New guidelines for traumatic brain injury — Built with input from rehabilitation professionals
09/10/2018 Benefits of methylphenidate for long-term attention problems after traumatic brain injury in childhood
09/07/2018 Concussions loosen insulation around brain cells
09/06/2018 The effect of antidepressants on depression after traumatic brain injury
09/05/2018 Helmets may not protect skiers from traumatic brain injury
09/04/2018 Device aims to detect concussion symptoms in the blink of an eye
08/31/2018 Different, but still whole: A young scientist reflects on his journey back from a brain injury
08/30/2018 Traumatic brain injury recovery via electrically stimulating neuron cells
08/29/2018 Head and neck positioning affects concussion risk
08/28/2018 Protecting against brain injuries
08/27/2018 Diagnosed: Under-reported brain injuries and their lasting effects
08/24/2018 Traumatic brain injury and incarceration: Ending a vicious cycle
08/23/2018 Association between traumatic brain injury and risk of suicide
08/22/2018 Genetic risk for ADHD not linked to ADHD symptoms after TBI
08/21/2018 How concussion stresses the heart, to protect the brain
08/20/2018 Immune Tolerance Therapy: A new method for treatment of traumatic brain injury
08/17/2018 Marriage breakdown after brain injury
08/16/2018 Suicide risk higher in people with brain injury
08/15/2018 ognitive training can reduce depressive symptoms in individuals with traumatic brain injury
08/14/2018 Researchers link residential characteristics with productivity one year after brain injury
08/13/2018 Serum magnesium as a marker of neurological outcome in traumatic brain injury patients
08/10/2018 Employment stability in the first 5 years after traumatic brain injury
08/09/2018 Concussion symptoms: take them seriously
08/08/2018 How severe brain injury might trigger dementia
08/07/2018 Head injury risk higher for female soccer players
08/06/2018 Scientists develop blood-drop test for concussion
08/03/2018 Finding lost emotions after brain injury
08/02/2018 Poor sleep is linked to impeded recovery from traumatic brain injury
08/01/2018 Sleep disturbance in children with traumatic brain injury compared with children with orthopedic injury
07/31/2018 The relationship between mental health and quality of life in children with traumatic brain injury three months after the injury
07/30/2018 Traumatic brain injury: Discovery of two molecules could lead to new drug treatments
07/27/2018 Study supports blood test to help diagnose brain injury
07/26/2018 ADHD tied to increased concussion risk for kids
07/25/2018 Developmental outcomes after traumatic brain injury in young children: Are infants more vulnerable than toddlers?
07/24/2018 Acupuncture for treatment of persistent disturbed sleep: A randomized clinical trial in veterans with mild traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder
07/23/2018 8-year outcome after severe traumatic brain injury
07/20/2018 Scientists hunt for a test to diagnose chronic brain injury in living people
07/19/2018 TBI biomarker shows promise to support rapid damage evaluation & predict outcomes
07/18/2018 Exosomes in blood indicate mild TBI
07/17/2018 Concussion may bring greater risks for athletes with ADHD
07/16/2018 Emotional reserve and prolonged post-concussive symptoms and disability
07/13/2018 Concussion pill shows promise in pre-clinical pilot study
07/12/2018 Do mild concussions increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease?
07/11/2018 Obesity and overweight linked to long-term health problems after traumatic brain injury
07/10/2018 People with traumatic brain injury are at increased risk of dementia
07/09/2018 Sex-based differences in affective and cognitive empathy following severe traumatic brain injury
07/06/2018 Time-based prospective memory in children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury
07/05/2018 Psychological resilience is associated with participation outcomes following traumatic brain injury
07/03/2018 Starting physical therapy earlier may benefit adolescents with concussion
07/02/2018 Scientists identify immune cells that remove degenerating neurons after brain injury
06/29/2018 The influence of yoga on individuals with traumatic brain injury related to sleep and mood
06/28/2018 Clinical validation of S100B in the management of a mild traumatic brain injury
06/27/2018 Barriers and enablers to aligning rehabilitation goals to patient life roles following acquired brain injury
06/26/2018 Deficits in saccades and smooth-pursuit eye movements in adults with traumatic brain injury
06/25/2018 ‘Antifreeze’ molecules may stop and reverse damage from brain injuries
06/22/2018 Simple cognitive task after brain injury improves memory function
06/21/2018 Melatonin as a treatment after traumatic brain injury
06/20/2018 Disability and quality of life 20 years after traumatic brain injury
06/19/2018 One-year outcome following brain injury: a comparison of younger versus elderly major trauma patients
06/19/2018 Concussion symptoms vary depending on your sex, & here’s why it matters
06/18/2018 Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in moderate to severe head injured patients: Pure DAI vs. non-pure DAI
06/18/2018 Targeting inflammation may protect and restore the brain after stroke
06/15/2018 The incidence of anosmia after traumatic brain injury
06/14/2018 Characterization of balance control after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury
06/13/2018 Sedentary behavior predicts headache pain following mild traumatic brain injury
06/12/2018 The relationship between agitation and impairments of orientation and memory during the PTA period after traumatic brain injury
06/11/2018 Relationship between hispanic nativity, residential environment, and productive activity among individuals with traumatic brain injury
06/08/2018 Traumatic brain injury and the risk for subsequent crime perpetration
06/07/2018 Predictors of neuropsychological outcome after pediatric concussion
06/07/2018 Scientists work to dissolve the NETs that worsen TBI damage
06/06/2018 Risk of depression following traumatic brain injury in a large national sample
06/05/2018 Traumatic brain injury history and progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease
06/04/2018 Efficacy of the resilience and adjustment intervention after traumatic brain injury
06/01/2018 Obsessive-compulsive disorder due to traumatic brain injury
05/31/2018 Melatonin as a therapy for traumatic brain injury
05/31/2018 After a concussion, waiting for the sense of smell to return
05/30/2018 Positive psychology perspective on traumatic brain injury recovery and rehabilitation
05/30/2018 Traumatic brain injury without loss of consciousness associated with increased dementia risk
05/29/2018 Role of magnetic resonance spectroscopy for prognosis of patients with traumatic brain injury
05/24/2018 Assessing the longer-term effects of mild traumatic brain injury on self-reported driving ability
05/24/2018 Strategic training may cut symptoms of depression post-brain injury
05/23/2018 Onset, time course and prediction of spasticity after stroke or traumatic brain injury
05/23/2018 Unmet therapy needs common in children with traumatic brain injury
05/22/2018 The effectiveness of physical exercise as an intervention to reduce depressive symptoms following traumatic brain injury
05/22/2018 How can we help children with brain injuries transition back to school?
05/21/2018 The experience of return to work in individuals with traumatic brain injury
05/18/2018 Amantadine did not positively impact cognition in chronic traumatic brain injury
05/17/2018 Frequency and prognostic factors of olfactory dysfunction after traumatic brain injury
05/17/2018 Even mild concussion tied to greater dementia risk later
05/16/2018 Methylphenidate-mediated motor control enhancement in patients with traumatic brain injury
05/16/2018 A life shattered by brain injury
05/15/2018 Outcomes in nursing home patients with traumatic brain injury
05/15/2018 Changes to tiny blood vessels may help diagnose traumatic brain injuries
05/14/2018 Brain plasticity and modern neurorehabilitation technologies
05/14/2018 Acute and chronic changes in myelin following mild traumatic brain injury
05/11/2018 Extra practice outside therapy sessions to maximize training opportunity during inpatient rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury
05/11/2018 Playing football young may mean earlier cognitive, emotional problems
05/10/2018 A case report of guardian-consent forced paliperidone palmitate for behavioral disturbance due to traumatic brain injury
05/10/2018 How injuries change our brain and how we can help it recover
05/09/2018 Psychological well-being in individuals living in the community with traumatic brain injury
05/09/2018 One concussion could increase risk of Parkinson’s disease
05/08/2018 Fatigue and associated factors in traumatic brain injury and its correlation with insomnia and depression
05/08/2018 Soccer heading — not collisions — cognitively impairs players
05/07/2018 Prediction of persistent post-concussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury
05/07/2018 The scientific reason a brain injury can change your personality
05/04/2018 The experience of a recreational camp for families with a child or young person with acquired brain injury
05/04/2018 Blood biomarkers may allow easier detection, confirmation of concussions
05/03/2018 Traumatic brain injury-related symptoms reported by parents: clinical, imaging, and host predictors in children with impairments in consciousness <24 hours
05/03/2018 Many U.S. kids with brain injuries not getting needed rehab
05/02/2018 Plasma metabolomic biomarkers accurately classify acute mild traumatic brain injury from controls
05/02/2018 Blood test reveals progress of concussion recovery in athletes
05/01/2018 Is electroconvulsive therapy a treatment for depression following traumatic brain injury?
05/01/2018 Starting aerobic exercise soon after concussion improves recovery time
04/30/2018 Behavioral interventions for inappropriate sexual behavior in individuals with acquired brain injury
04/30/2018 Does concussion recovery and symptom severity differ between men and women?
04/27/2018 Fear avoidance and clinical outcomes from mild traumatic brain injury
04/27/2018 Research suggests that kids with brain injuries have a higher risk of ADHD
04/26/2018 Unmet rehabilitation needs after hospitalization for traumatic brain injury
04/26/2018 Traumatic brain injury—the unseen impact of domestic violence
04/25/2018 Effects of electrical stimulation in people with post-concussion syndromes
04/25/2018 Researchers chart a new way to look at concussion
04/24/2018 Acute prediction of outcome and cognitive-communication impairments following traumatic brain injury: the influence of age, education and site of lesion
04/24/2018 Scientists watch in real time as the lining of the brain heals itself after traumatic injury
04/23/2018 Behavioral and neurophysiological abnormalities during cued continuous performance tasks in patients with mild traumatic brain injury
04/23/2018 Reversing brain injury in newborns and adults
04/19/2018 Understanding divergent trajectories in pediatric patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury
04/19/2018 Receptor that feels the heat of a red chili pepper may be target for TBI recovery
04/18/2018 Behavioral and brain imaging changes in patients receiving bright light therapy following a mild traumatic brain injury
04/18/2018 Brain injuries increase dementia risk, study finds
04/17/2018 Distinct 6-Month functional outcome trajectories and predictors after traumatic brain injury
04/17/2018 Scientists have discovered a new stem cell that could heal brain damage
04/16/2018 Neuroendocrine abnormalities following traumatic brain injury: An important contributor to neuropsychiatric sequelae
04/16/2018 Concussion increases the risk of prolonged headache woes
04/13/2018 MLC901 (NeuroAiD II™ ) for cognition after traumatic brain injury
04/13/2018 Multiple, smaller head blows can be worse than concussions
04/12/2018 The impact of cultural background on outcome following traumatic brain injury
04/12/2018 Waking up “sleeping” stem cells in the brain could improve its ability to repair injury
04/11/2018 Perceived stigma and its association with participation following traumatic brain injury
04/11/2018 Could this drug help the brain recover after a stroke?
04/10/2018 Trajectories in health recovery in the 12 months following a mild traumatic brain injury in children
04/09/2018 Interpersonal stressors and resources as predictors of adolescent adjustment following traumatic brain injury
04/06/2018 Effects of web-based parent training on caregiver functioning following pediatric traumatic brain injury
04/05/2018 The association of rehospitalization with participation 5 years after traumatic brain injury
04/05/2018 Gene therapy may help brain heal from stroke
04/04/2018 Exercise rehabilitation attenuates cognitive deficits with traumatic brain injury
04/04/2018 Prosthetic memories help brain injury patients with short-term recall
04/03/2018 Altruistic decisions following penetrating traumatic brain injury
04/02/2018 Imagining the future in children with severe traumatic brain injury
03/30/2018 Depression in the first year after traumatic brain injury
03/29/2018 Fatigue following pediatric acquired brain injury and its impact on functional outcomes
03/28/2018 Secondary Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents 5 to 10 years after traumatic brain injury
03/27/2018 Predictors of post-discharge seizures in children with traumatic brain injury
03/27/2018 Kids with severe brain injuries may develop ADHD
03/26/2018 Longitudinal recovery of executive control functions after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury
03/23/2018 Use of an errorless learning approach in a person with concomitant traumatic spinal cord injury and brain injury
03/22/2018 Long-term effects of mild traumatic brain injuries to oculomotor tracking performances and reaction times to simple environmental stimuli
03/21/2018 Relax while you rehabilitate: A pilot study integrating a novel, yoga-based mindfulness group intervention into a residential military brain injury rehabilitation program
03/20/2018 Association of post-traumatic stress symptom severity with health-related quality of life and self-reported functioning across 12-months after severe traumatic brain injury
03/19/2018 Persistent symptoms and activity changes three months after mild traumatic brain injury
03/16/2018 Interventions to enhance coping after traumatic brain injury
03/15/2018 Is there a correlation between family functioning and functional recovery in patients with acquired brain injury?
03/14/2018 Efficacy of a micro-prompting technology in reducing support needed by people with severe acquired brain injury in activities of daily living
03/13/2018 Assessment of recovery following pediatric traumatic brain injury
03/12/2018 Magnesium administration after experimental traumatic brain injury improves decision-making skills
03/09/2018 Hearing loss after traumatic brain injury
03/08/2018 Persistent symptoms and activity changes three months after mild traumatic brain injury
03/07/2018 Aerobic exercise for adolescents with prolonged symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury
03/07/2018 Girls’ concussion symptoms last twice as long as those in boys
03/06/2018 Visual problems associated with traumatic brain injury
03/05/2018 Lifelong behavioral and neuropathological consequences of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury
03/02/2018 Cognitive function and participation in children and youth with mild traumatic brain injury two years after injury
03/01/2018 Trajectory of functional independent measurements during first 5-years following traumatic brain injury
02/28/2018 Safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of dextromethorphan for pseudobulbar affect following traumatic brain injury
02/27/2018 Blood biomarkers in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury
02/26/2018 Cerebral blood vessel damage in traumatic brain injury
02/23/2018 Long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury in bone metabolism
02/23/2018 All children do not follow the same path to concussion recovery
02/22/2018 Traumatic brain injury, sleep disorders, and psychiatric disorders: An underrecognized relationship
02/22/2018 Positive psychology helps brain injury survivors recover with a better outlook on life
02/21/2018 Virtual reality for pediatric traumatic brain injury rehabilitation
02/21/2018 Genetic risk score could help predict patient’s quality of life after traumatic brain injury
02/20/2018 A review of sleep disturbances following traumatic brain injury
02/20/2018 FDA approves first blood test to help diagnose brain injuries
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02/15/2018 The effects of timing and intensity of neurorehabilitation on functional outcome after traumatic brain injury
02/14/2018 Effectiveness of occupation and activity-based interventions for people with traumatic brain injury
02/13/2018 Traumatic brain injury history is associated with an earlier age of dementia onset
02/13/2018 Women more likely to suffer sports-related concussions
02/12/2018 Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on chronic central pain after mild traumatic brain injury
02/09/2018 Predicting the trajectory of participation after traumatic brain injury
02/09/2018 A tiny pulse of electricity can help the brain form lasting memories
02/08/2018 A systematic review and meta-analysis of sleep architecture and chronic traumatic brain injury
02/07/2018 Changes in oculomotor function in young adults with mild traumatic brain injury
02/06/2018 Transcranial ultrasound stimulation improves long-term functional outcomes and protects against brain damage in traumatic brain injury
02/06/2018 Could a vaccine protect football players from concussion?
02/02/2018 Impaired theory of mind in adults with traumatic brain injury
02/01/2018 Headache following head injury: a population-based longitudinal cohort study
02/01/2018 Concussions tied to rise in dementia risk decades later
01/31/2018 Effects of fatigue, driving status, cognition, and depression on participation in adults with traumatic brain injury
01/30/2018 Impact & blast traumatic brain injury: Implications for therapy
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01/24/2018 Depression: The often overlooked sequela of head trauma
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01/16/2018 Cognitive behavioral intervention compared to telephone counseling early after mild traumatic brain injury
01/15/2018 Effects of neurofeedback on the short-term memory and continuous attention of patients with moderate traumatic brain injury
01/12/2018 Growing literature but limited evidence: A systematic review regarding prebiotic and probiotic interventions for those with traumatic brain injury
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01/11/2018 A retrospective analysis of the relationship between facial injury and mild traumatic brain injury
01/10/2018 Psychosocial and executive function recovery trajectories one year after pediatric traumatic brain injury: The influence of age and injury severity
01/09/2018 Concussion in adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis
01/08/2018 Dizziness-related disability following mild-moderate traumatic brain injury
01/05/2018 Predicting fatigue 12 months after child traumatic brain injury
01/04/2018 The prevalence of traumatic brain injury, comorbid anxiety and other psychiatric disorders in an outpatient child and adolescent mental health service
01/03/2018 Does the fear avoidance model explain persistent symptoms after traumatic brain injury?
01/02/2018 Self-awareness four years after severe traumatic brain injury

via Traumatic Brain Injury Resource Guide – Brain Injury News

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[NEWS] Walk This Way to Post-Stroke Recovery

Published on 

 

 

by Kate Drolet, PT, DPT, NCS, CLT-LANA, and Kristine Buchler, PT, DPT

In the heart of Chicago’s bustling Streeterville neighborhood lies Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, formerly the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. In March 2017, the organization opened a $550 million, 1.2-million-square-foot facility as a “translational” research hospital in which clinicians, scientists, innovators, and technologists work together in the same space, surrounding patients, discovering new approaches, and applying (or “translating”) research in real time.

Within the 27-floor rehabilitation hospital, this translational model plays out in the five ability labs—applied research and therapeutic spaces—each focused on specific functional outcomes. Together, therapists and researchers offer evidence-based interventions for a minimum of 3 hours each day. The goal: better, faster outcomes for patients.

For instance, the Legs + Walking Lab is a dynamic, two-story space designed for inpatients to focus specifically on gait training, stairs, balance and strengthening related to lower-body impairments due to brain injury, stroke, spinal cord injury, or diseases of the nerves, muscles, or bones.

While this list is not all-encompassing, one of the most prevalent diagnoses treated in the Legs + Walking Lab is stroke—and one of the most common therapies offered for post-stroke patients is gait training.

At the heart of Shirley Ryan AbilityLab’s efforts to lead patients toward an optimum outcome are more than 200 active clinical trials and research studies aimed at improving recovery post-stroke. Interdisciplinary teams consisting of physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, doctors, nurses, researchers, psychologists, and social workers work together with patients to identify specific goals and then outline a treatment program aimed at maximizing functional independence.

Patients also are referred to therapists based within the various ability labs who specialize in areas such as gait training, vestibular therapy, task-specific upper extremity training, aphasia, dysphagia, cognition, and pain. These therapists work closely with the primary therapists to identify the proper dosage, intensity and duration of sessions needed to facilitate neural reorganization for their specific interventions.

 

 

Gait Training Out of the Gate

In the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab Legs + Walking Lab, gait therapists focus on promoting locomotor recovery for patients post-stroke. The primary physical therapists refer patients to gait therapy if walking goals are indicated, usually soon after completion of the initial evaluation.

Why is it so important to commence gait therapy soon after evaluation? Research indicates that earlier and more intensive rehabilitation post-stroke yields a quicker return to independent ambulation and improved functional mobility.1As a result, getting patients up and moving as quickly as possible is the expectation once vitals are stable. If gait training is indicated but is not yet safe due to unstable vitals or orthostatic hypotension, patients still often will be referred to gait therapists to assist with tolerance to upright training using the tilt table or stander before progressing to ambulation.

The literature has shown that repetition, intensity, and task-specificity are important principles of neuroplasticity to consider for gait recovery post-stroke.2 Gait therapists work with the primary physical therapists to promote large amounts of high-intensity, task-specific gait training with each patient to facilitate plasticity of both neuromuscular and cardiopulmonary systems. Walking practice is prioritized during most physical therapy sessions to achieve sufficient dosage and repetition.

Although conventional practice often involves spending time on multiple different interventions, research has indicated that high-intensity gait training also can translate to improvements in non-walking tasks such as balance and transfers, despite not focusing on those tasks.2-4

Using the Latest Specialized Equipment

At Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, therapists are fortunate to have a great deal of specialized equipment readily available to assist with implementing gait interventions with stroke survivors.

Therapists often are helping patients get up for the first time after their strokes. This may require a great deal of assistance. Because the safety of both patients and therapists is always a priority, the Legs + Walking Lab is outfitted with body-weight supported treadmills and overhead gait tracks for mobilizing lower-level patients.

Even for patients who may not require body weight support, harness systems are still used for safety and fall prevention when performing treadmill training or when challenging patients during higher-level balance activities overground. There is also a suspension system over the staircase in the Legs + Walking Lab, which provides a safe method for patients to relearn stair climbing.

In terms of modality of walking practice, the evidence is unclear as to whether treadmill or overground training is more effective in facilitating locomotor recovery. Therefore, therapists must consider how best to achieve the principles of neuroplasticity when choosing the modality for gait training. For lower-level patients who require more assistance, this generally means an increased, early focus on body weight-supported treadmill training early on to maximize repetition and intensity. Then, as patients progress, therapists can integrate overground gait training more frequently to promote increased task specificity. For patients who require less assistance, treatment sessions are generally more evenly divided between treadmill and overground gait training.

Although the Legs + Walking Lab has a robotic treadmill device, it is not commonly used during stroke rehabilitation. Evidence indicates that robotic-assisted gait training is less effective than therapist-assisted gait training in improving walking ability post-stroke.5,6 However, there are certain circumstances in which robotic-assisted gait training may be indicated to reduce the physical burden placed on therapists when gait training with stroke survivors who do not have much motor return and require a significant amount of assistance to advance both legs.

In addition, therapists have access to various exoskeletons for patients in the Legs + Walking Lab that are used in conjunction with treadmill and overground gait training due to limited research using exoskeletons in the post-stroke population.

The Shirley Ryan AbilityLab’s Legs + Walking Lab is designed for patients and research participants with diagnoses affecting lower-body function due to brain or spinal cord injury and diseases of the nerves, muscles, and bones. Researchers and clinicians focus on  advancing trunk, pelvic, and leg function, movement, and balance in this dynamic, applied research and therapeutic space.

The Shirley Ryan AbilityLab’s Legs + Walking Lab is designed for patients and research participants with diagnoses affecting lower-body function due to brain or spinal cord injury and diseases of the nerves, muscles, and bones. Researchers and clinicians focus on advancing trunk, pelvic, and leg function, movement, and balance in this dynamic, applied research and therapeutic space.

When to Challenge, When to Modify

When progressing gait interventions for patients post-stroke, the initial focus is on decreasing the amount of body weight support or level of assistance as able. Once patients begin to require less assistance and are able to perform stepping without assistance, therapists can begin to progress the challenge of the task. Evidence suggests that variability and error play an important role in motor learning and can contribute to improvements in locomotor function in stroke survivors.3,5-8 Therefore, these principles are crucial to integrate into gait interventions. This is done by allowing kinematic variability and providing variation to the task and environment, incorporating activities such as multi-directional stepping, obstacle negotiation, uneven surfaces, or changes in gait speed. Therapists can then adjust the level of challenge depending on patient response. If a patient does not make any errors, it generally means that the task is not challenging enough and should be progressed. Conversely, if a patient demonstrates several consecutive errors and is unable to correct without assistance, that generally indicates that the task is too challenging and should be modified.

Throughout the progression of gait training, the physical therapists monitor intensity and exercise tolerance based on heart rate and blood pressure response to activity, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and verbal and nonverbal signs and symptoms if a patient has cognitive and/or communication deficits. It is also important to evaluate progress in order to guide clinical decision-making and determine whether the interventions are effective. This is done using various outcome measures, such as the Functional Independence Measure, 6 Minute Walk Test, 10 Meter Walk Test, Berg Balance Scale and Functional Gait Assessment, in addition to clinical judgment and observation. At times, primary physical therapists or lab therapists who specialize in gait training may need to decrease the frequency of gait training sessions if a patient is not responding well, if progress is limited, or if the goals of a patient’s stay shift to family education in preparation for discharge.

The Next Chapter: Therapy After Discharge

After patients discharge from the hospital, they will likely continue at a Shirley Ryan AbilityLab DayRehab or Shirley Ryan AbilityLab outpatient location. There, they will receive additional therapy, similar to the inpatient setting, while commuting to and from their homes. Therapists at DayRehab and outpatient locations continue to promote high-intensity gait training with an emphasis on home exercise programs, community reintegration, and return to work, when appropriate.

Some patients travel long distances for the intensive inpatient therapy program, so outpatient therapy at a local clinic or hospital may be the only option close to home after discharge. For these patients, inpatient therapists at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab train families and personal caregivers to implement the principles of neuroplasticity and advocate for high-intensity gait training after discharge.

Regardless of a patient’s particular journey, the message for post-stroke recovery is clear: the more walking, the better. RM

Kate Drolet, PT, DPT, NCS, CLT-LANA, earned a bachelor’s degree in exercise physiology and a doctorate in physical therapy from Marquette University in Milwaukee. She is a Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Neurological Physical Therapy and a Certified Lymphedema Therapist through the Lymphology Association of North America. She practices at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab (formerly Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago) and specializes in gait training for patients with neurologic conditions in the inpatient setting.

Kristine Buchler, PT, DPT, earned a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a doctor of physical therapy degree at Northwestern University. She currently practices as a physical therapist at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab and specializes in gait training for patients with neurologic conditions in the inpatient setting. For more information, contact RehabEditor@medqor.com.

This article appears in the January/February 2019 print issue of Rehab Management with the title, “Walk This Way.”

References

1. Cumming TB, Thrift AG, Collier JM, et al. Very early mobilization after stroke fast-tracks return to walking. Stroke. 2011;42(1):153-158. https://doi.org/10.1161/strokeaha.110.594598

2. Hornby TG, Straube DS, Kinnaird CR, et al. Importance of specificity, amount, and intensity of locomotor training to improve ambulatory function in patients poststroke. Top Stroke Rehabil. 2011;18(4):293-307. https://doi.org/10.1310/tsr1804-293

3. Hornby TG, Holleran CL, Hennessy PW, et al. Variable intensive early walking poststroke (VIEWS). Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2015;30(5):440-450. https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968315604396

4. Straube DD, Holleran CL, Kinnaird CR, Leddy AL, Hennessy PW, Hornby TG. Effects of dynamic stepping training on nonlocomotor tasks in individuals poststroke. Phys Ther. 2014;94(7):921-933. https://doi.org/10.2522/ptj.20130544

5. Hornby TG, Campbell DD, Kahn JH, Demott T, Moore JL, Roth HR. Enhanced gait-related improvements after therapist- versus robotic-assisted locomotor training in subjects with chronic stroke. Stroke. 2008;39(6):1786-1792. https://doi.org/10.1161/strokeaha.107.504779

6. Hidler J, Nichols D, Pelliccio M, et al. Multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of the Lokomat in subacute stroke. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2009;23(1):5-13. https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968308326632

7. Holleran CL, Straube DD, Kinnaird CR, Leddy AL, Hornby TG. Feasibility and potential efficacy of high-intensity stepping training in variable contexts in subacute and chronic stroke. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2014;28(7):643-651. https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968314521001

8. Reisman DS, McLean H, Keller J, Danks KA, Bastian AJ. Repeated split-belt treadmill training improves poststroke step length asymmetry. Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2013;27(5):460-468. https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968312474118

 

via Walk This Way to Post-Stroke Recovery – Rehab Managment

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[BLOG POST] The importance of focus when living with a brain injury | Jumbledbrain

via The importance of focus when living with a brain injury | Jumbledbrain

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[BLOG POST] A Brain Injury Life – formerly TBI to LIFE

Perception of Self after Brain Injury

Lately I’ve been wondering whether brain injury really changed the person I am or if it just added a new layer to my old self.  It may be impossible to articulate and probably unanswerable. Obviously, an injury physically changes how the brain works and directly causes a host of problems—physical pain, cognitive deficits, and the loss of identity (e.g. the tendency to ask existential questions like this). But cause and effect are not always clear. There are many problems that could be organic or could just as well be new incarnations of innate character traits.

I’ve gotten used to the idea that everything different in my life since my TBI has either been caused by the brain injury or what I learned in my neuropsychological rehabilitation. But what if there are fewer changes than I imagined? Am I still who I was but with some parts missing? That would explain the feeling of being lost in a foreign land.

For example, I used to think I was always right. But if brain injury has altered me functionally (it has, now I am often wrong), while leaving my sense of self intact (i.e. I still see myself as in the right), my perception would contradict reality. Since I’m nothing if not logical, one or the other would have to give. The belief of always being right could, unconsciously, be directed somewhere else. So instead of being convinced that my answers were better, I’d think I was wiser because I’d learned the best strategies, and was convinced that I could recognize a brain injury—or deficit—intuitively and in the moment. Which I am.

Does that make any sense? One more try:

If brain injury changed the life I lived—the structure, productivity, and satisfaction—but not who I think I am in life, it would explain why I feel rudderless. I keep trying to find my place in the world, a goal I can realistically accomplish and the initiation to follow through. Instead, I feel like I have no purpose. I come up with labels to define myself like an advocate (really?), a leader in the community (since when—6 years ago?), or educating people about brain injury (who am I teaching?). So what’s up with that?

All I can say with certainty is that the feeling of being unmoored seems to grow deeper as time passes.

via A Brain Injury Life – formerly TBI to LIFE

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[VIDEO] Brain Injury: A helping hand

“Every brain injury is different and there are no hard and fast rules about how it effects people. But it would certainly help if people were more educated about its hidden nature and some of the most common effects.”

via A helping hand | Headway

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[WEB SITE] Increased intracranial pressure (ICP): Symptoms, causes, and treatment

Last reviewed

Increased intracranial pressure is a medical term that refers to growing pressure inside a person’s skull. This pressure can affect the brain if doctors do not treat it.

A sudden increase in the pressure inside a person’s skull is a medical emergency. Left untreated, an increase in the intracranial pressure (ICP) may lead to brain injury, seizure, comastroke, or death.

With prompt treatment, it is possible for people with increased ICP to make a full recovery.

In this article, we look at the symptoms, causes, and treatments of increased ICP.

Symptoms of increased ICP

The symptoms of increased ICP can vary depending on a person’s age.

Infants with increased ICP may have different symptoms to older children or adults with the condition, as discussed below.

Symptoms in adults

Woman with a headache who is sleepy, possibly caused by increased intracranial pressure

Symptoms of increased ICP can include headache, sleepiness, and blurred vision.
Symptoms of increased ICP in adults include:

  • pupils that do not respond to light in the usual way
  • headache
  • behavior changes
  • reduced alertness
  • sleepiness
  • muscle weakness
  • speech or movement difficulties
  • vomiting
  • blurred vision
  • confusion

As raised ICP progresses, a person may lose consciousness and go into a coma. High ICP may cause brain damage if a person does not receive emergency treatment.

Symptoms in infants

Infants with increased ICP may show some of the same symptoms as adults. In addition, the shape of their heads may be affected.

Infants still have soft plates in their skull that fibrous tissue called skull sutures knit together. Increased ICP may cause the skull sutures to separate and the soft plates to move apart.

Increased ICP in infants may also cause their fontanel to bulge out. The fontanel is the soft spot on the top of the skull.

Causes

The following is a list of medical conditions and other causes that can lead to increased ICP:

In infants, high ICP may be the result of child abuse.

If a person handles a baby or infant too roughly, it may cause them to develop a brain injury. This is known as shaken baby syndrome.

One source has estimated that between 1,000 and 3,000 children in the United States experience shaken baby syndrome each year. The condition may arise if an adult shakes a baby violently to stop them crying.

Anyone who suspects a child may be experiencing abuse can contact the National Child Abuse Hotline anonymously at 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453).

Diagnosis

Woman having a CT scan

If a person has the symptoms of increased ICP, they should see a doctor straight away. This is a medical emergency and may lead to brain injury if a person does not receive rapid treatment.

A doctor will measure the ICP in millimeters of mercury (mm/Hg). The normal range is less than 20 mm/Hg. When ICP goes above this, a person may be experiencing increased ICP.

To diagnose increased ICP, a doctor may ask if a person has:

  • experienced a blow to a head
  • a previous diagnosis of a brain tumor

Then, the doctor may carry out the following tests:

  • neurological exam to test a person’s senses, balance, and mental state
  • spinal tap that measures cerebrospinal fluid pressure
  • CT scan that produces images of the head and brain

After these initial tests, the doctor may use an MRI scan to examine a person’s brain tissue in more detail.

Treatment

If a person has a diagnosis of increased ICP, a doctor will immediately work to reduce the pressure inside the skull to lessen the risk of brain damage. They will then work to treat the underlying cause of the increased pressure.

Treatment methods for reducing ICP include:

  • draining the excess cerebrospinal fluid with a shunt, to reduce pressure on the brain that hydrocephalus has caused
  • medication that reduces brain swelling, such as mannitol and hypertonic saline
  • surgery, less commonly, to remove a small section of the skull and relieve the pressure

A doctor may give the person a sedative to help reduce anxiety and lower their blood pressure. The person may also need breathing support. The doctor will monitor their vital signs throughout their treatment.

In rare cases, the doctor may put a person with high ICP into a medically induced coma to treat their condition.

Complications

Complications of increased ICP include:

  • brain damage
  • seizure
  • stroke
  • coma

Without proper treatment, increased ICP can be fatal.

Outlook

A sudden increase in ICP is a medical emergency and can be life-threatening. The sooner a person receives treatment, the better their outlook. Many people respond well to treatment, and a person who has experienced increased ICP can make a full recovery.

Preventing increased ICP and its complications

Increased ICP is not always preventable, but it is possible to reduce the risk of some underlying conditions that may lead to increased ICP. We explore how below.

Stroke

seniors exercising in a park

A person can reduce ther risk of stroke by exercising regularly.

Stroke may cause increased ICP. A person can reduce their risk of stroke in the following ways:

  • taking steps to lower high blood pressure
  • stopping smoking
  • managing blood sugar levels
  • controlling cholesterol levels
  • exercising regularly

High blood pressure

High blood pressure may cause increased ICP. A person can maintain healthy blood pressure by:

  • losing weight if overweight or maintaining a healthy weight
  • avoiding drugs that increase blood pressure
  • eating a healthful, balanced diet
  • reducing salt intake
  • exercising regularly

Head injury

A head injury may cause increased ICP. Some examples of how a person can reduce their risk of head injury include:

  • avoiding extreme sports or dangerous activities
  • always wearing a helmet for activities such as riding a bike
  • always wearing a seatbelt when in a car

Summary

Increased ICP is when the pressure inside a person’s skull increases. When this happens suddenly, it is a medical emergency. The most common cause of high ICP is a blow to the head.

The main symptoms are headache, confusion, decreased alertness, and nausea. A person’s pupils may not respond to light in the usual way.

A person with increased ICP may need urgent treatment. The immediate aim of treatment is to bring down the pressure on their brain tissue, which helps to reduce the risk of brain damage.

Without proper treatment, this condition may lead to seizure, coma, stroke, or brain damage. In severe cases, increased ICP can be fatal. Rapid treatment may improve a person’s outlook. Making a full recovery with timely treatment is possible.

Increased ICP is not always preventable, but a person can reduce their risk of some causes through lifestyle changes.

 

via Increased intracranial pressure (ICP): Symptoms, causes, and treatment

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[WEB SITE] Life-Changing Apps for People with Brain Injury – BrainLine

 

Posted on BrainLine February 20, 2018. Reviewed January 7, 2019.
Life-Changing Apps for People with Brain Injury

Almost every day, we hear of new apps developed for just about everything — from staying organized to finding pharmacies or restaurants while on the road. It’s hard to keep up.

Some of these apps have proven to be especially helpful for people with brain injury. The phone can be used to remind you of an upcoming appointment or to take medication, or it can be used like a traditional paper notebook to keep all your addresses, telephone numbers, calendar items, lists, and ideas.

Name Description Price Device Helps With
AccessNow AccessNow is sharing accessibility information about places around the world. Search for specific places like a restaurant, hotel or store, or browse the map to see what is nearby with the accessibility features you require. If info isn’t already on our map, you can add it yourself and contribute to our worldwide community. Filter the map by category and tags and find the access that you need now. Free iOSAndroid Accessibility
Android Accessibility Suite Android Accessibility Suite (formerly Google Talkback) is an accessibility feature. Its goal is to help the visually impaired navigate their devices. These features come built in with virtually every version of Androidand can be activated in the Settings menu. The app will then help the visually impaired interact with their devices. It’s fairly basic, but effective. It adds things like vibration, spoken, and audible feedback. Free Android Communication, Accessibility
Audible Listen to books on your mobile device. Great for people who have trouble reading or who retain information more effectively by listening. Free iOSAndroid Reading
Be My Eyes Fostering the largest global community for the blind and visually impaired, the free app, Be My Eyes, virtually connects someone with vision problems with a sighted volunteer who can help them “see.” Using any smartphone, a blind or visually impaired user can open the app to request assistance, be connected through live video with a sighted volunteer, and then point their camera at what they want described to them. The sighted volunteer will then tell the user what they see in the user’s native language – it’s as simple as that! Free iOSAndroid Accessibility
Behavior Tracker Pro Application that allows caregivers, behavioral therapists, aides, or teachers to track behaviors and automatically graph them. Option to record video of behaviors or interventions to later review with doctors, parents, teachers or therapists. $29.99 iOS Behavior
BestSuite This suite of three apps help people with brain injuries and other challenges get more done! Set and monitor goals, track and understand where your energy goes, get automatic reminders to take breaks — see it all appear in your calendar. Free video instruction and app training is also available on the BEST Connection website. $9.99 iOS Organization, Life-Skills, Memory
Breathe2Relax Hands-on stress management tool with diaphragmatic breathing exercises. Designed to help you with mood stabilization, anger control, and anxiety management. Free iOSAndroid PTSD, Anxiety, Stress
Clear Record Pro Audio recording app that suppresses ambient, background noise allowing the user to record conversations in noisy environments while maintaining clear voices. Control play-speed without modifying pitch-quality. Slow down conversations to a manageable pace for the user. $1.99 iOSAndroid Speech, Communication
Concussion Recognition & Response:
For Parents/Youth Coaches
Helps coaches and parents recognize whether an individual is exhibiting/reporting the signs and symptoms of a suspected concussion. In less than 5 minutes, the app allows a coach or parent to respond quickly to determine whether to remove the child from play and the need for further medical examination. Free iOSAndroid Concussion Screening
Corkulous Pro Collect, organize, and share ideas on virtual cork boards. “Pin” notes, labels, photos, contacts, and tasks. Group ideas visually on one board or spread ideas out across multiple boards. Free* iOS Organization
Cozi Family Organizer Family life organization app that includes a shared calendar, shopping lists, to do lists, family journal. This app allows you to stay in sync with your family. * Paid version available for advanced functionality. Free* iOSAndroid Organization
dictate2us Transcription Voice recorder with integrated transcription service* provides you with a comprehensive dictation and transcription solution. Record, edit, and upload a digital recording then have the file transcribed to text. HIPAA compliant. * Transcriptions are a paid feature. Free* iOSAndroid Communication
DialSafe Pro Learn proper phone usage and safety with an app that allows for hands-on practice. Learn these critical skills through the use of animated lessons, skill building games, practice sessions, and a realistic phone simulator. Free iOS Life-Skills
Evernote Help remember everything across all of the devices you use. Stay organized, save your ideas and improve productivity. Take notes, capture photos, create to-do lists, record voice reminders, and make notes completely searchable. Free iOSWebAndroid Organization
Find My iPhone/Find My Device Location app that tracks wireless devices and enables a you to track where the devices are, where they have been, and enables you to send warning messages or tones to those devices. Free iOSAndroid Memory, Location Monitoring
Flashcards Deluxe Flashcard app which can be used to study just about anything you want. Built in dictionary, capacity to include pictures and sounds, zoom into pictures, and auto-repeat sounds on the cards. $3.99 iOSAndroid Memory
Google Maps Google Maps isn’t directly for the disabled or otherwise handicapped. However, it does have a variety of tools to help people with those kinds of issues. You can find stuff with wheelchair accessible entrances and the turn-by-turn navigation works even while walking. They even have a small group of engineers that work specifically on accessibility features, such as disability-friendly transit options. It takes a little bit of digging in the app, but it’s actually a pretty decent experience for this kind of stuff. Free iOSAndroid Accessibility
Hello My Name Is – Graffiti Sticker Use your fingers to write or draw your own personalized “hello my name is” name tag. Good for conferences or situations where a digital name tag may help you stand out. Free iOS Social Situations
iBooks with VoiceOver Search and instantly download thousands of popular book and magazine titles. iBooks works with VoiceOver, which will read the contents of the pages out loud. Free iOS Hearing, Reading
ICE Medical Standard ICE Medical Standard lets you put your emergency medical contact information on your smartphone’s lock screen image. If you are in an accident, first responders and emergency room staff can find your emergency medical contact information as soon as they turn on your smartphone. Free* iOSAndroid Emergency
IFTTT IFTTT is an app that helps you set up automated actions. It’s useful for a lot of various things: reading your text messages out loud, turning off your lights, and all kinds of other stuff. With a bit of investment, you can make most of your house compatible with IFTTT. That can make life a whole lot easier for a lot of people. However, it does take some work and potentially some money tog et eveything set up. The app is completely free, though. You can also find recipes for IFTTT with a simple Google Search. It’s one of the best disabled apps out there. Free iOSAndroid Accessibility
Index Card Non-linear writing tool that helps capture your ideas and store notes as they come to you. Organize the flow of your thoughts by using a familiar corkboard interface and compile your work into a single document. $4.99 iPad Organization
Inspiration Maps Inspiration Maps is a graphic organizer and idea-mapping tool that can help you visually organize ideas. You can create diagrams, maps, organizers, brainstorms, create text outlines, and easily share with others. The app allows you to create up to five documents to test the functionality of the app for free before using in-app purchase to upgrade to full, unlimited function. Free* iOS Organization
JABtalk JABtalk is a free speech communication application designed to help non-verbal children and adults communicate. Speech therapists commonly refer to JABtalk as an easy and effective augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device. By combining personalized voice and images with an extremely simple user interface, JABtalk delivers a speech solution that is both fun to use and easy to learn. Originally designed as a communication tool for children with special needs, JABtalk has evolved into a communication tool used by special needs children, stroke patients, toddlers, speech-language pathologists, and others. Free Android Communication
Learning Ally Link This app provides access to the Learning Ally library of human-read audiobooks offering the largest selection of books students want and need to read, including bestsellers, literature, and textbooks. Interactive learning tools include: highlighted text synced with the audio narration, speed control, bookmarking, highlighting, and note taking. * Learning Ally membership is required to use this app. Membership is free with eligible print disability. Free* iOSAndroid Reading, Vision
Lumosity Brain exercises targeting memory, attention, speed, flexibility, and problem solving. You can design your own personalized training, including “courses” with TBI- and/or PTSD-specific content. *Paid subscription available for advanced features. Free* iOSAndroidWeb Brain Training
MakeChange This app will show you the best way to count change so that you use the least number of coins. Slide and stack coins until you have the amount shown on the register display and check your answer. $1.99 iPad Life-Skills
Matrix Game Helps you develop visual perception skills such as visual discrimination. It can also help you to develop attention and concentration, spatial orientation and principles of classification and categorization. * Paid version available for advanced levels and more functionality. Free* iOSAndroid Problem Solving
Naming Therapy Word-finding app to help people with aphasia and children with special needs practice important naming and description skills. Allows users to add their own images. $24.99 iOSAndroid Communication, Speech
Notability A sleek, powerful note-taker to annotate documents, record lectures, sketch illustrations, and more. With built-in iCloud support, it’s perfect for keeping notes, documents, and doodles up to date on both iPhone and iPad. Also includes a great searchable microphone functions.“I can no longer focus on a speaker AND take quality notes. Notability permits me to go back in an amplify my notes to match speaker heard on microphone.” $9.99 iOS Organization
Penultimate Handwriting app that helps you get the fast, tactile gratification of writing on paper, with digital power and flexibility. Take notes, keep sketches, or share your next breakthrough idea — in the office, on the go, or at home. *Advanced functionality and features are paid. Free* iPad Memory, Organization
Pictello Create visual stories and talking books. Each page in a story can contain a picture, a short video, up to ten lines of text, and a recorded sound or text-to-speech using natural sounding voices. $19.99 iOS Communication
Proloquo2Go An alternative communication solution to help you if you have difficulty speaking. Natural sounding text-to-speech voices, high-resolution, up-to-date symbols, powerful automatic conjugations, a vocabulary of more than 7,000 items, and advanced word prediction. $249.99 iOS Communication
Proloquo 4 Text Text”‘based communication app that gives a voice to people who cannot speak. It offers a customizable single screen layout for easy conversation, free natural-sounding voices in 15 languages, word and sentence prediction and social media. $119.99 iOS Communication
PTSD Coach Designed for veterans and service members who have, or may have, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Education about PTSD, information about care, a self-assessment for PTSD, help finding support, and tools that can help you manage the stresses of daily life with PTSD. Free iOSAndroid PTSD
Quick Talk AAC This app gives a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves. Quick and flexible app designed to help you talk as quickly as possible. $24.99 iOSAndroid Communication
Red Panic Button This emergency app allows anyone to send out a call for help with the tap of a button. For people with disabilities, being able to quickly access assistance in case of an emergency or problem is very helpful. The app allows a user to send one SMS message to an entire list of panic contacts that also includes a Google Maps link to their location. Additional features include recording a 10 second audio message to send to contacts, notifying people on twitter, as well as sending emergency emails. $4.99 iOSAndroid Emergency, Communication
SpeakWrite Recorder Voice recorder that turns your phone into a fully functional dictation system. Record, edit, and send your audio. App integrates with SpeakWrite’s 24/7 paid transcription service. Compile your dictation, upload, and within a few hours receive your transcribed document. Free Android Speech, Communication
Spaced Retrieval Therapy Facilitates recalling an answer over expanding intervals of time (1 minute, 2 minutes, 4 minutes, 8 minutes…) helps to cement the information in memory, even for those with impaired memory. $3.99 iOSAndroid Memory
T2 Mood Tracker Designed for service members and veterans, this app helps you self-monitor, track, and reference emotional experiences associated with common deployment-related behavioral health issues like post-traumatic stress, brain injury, depression, and anxiety. Free iOSAndroid PTSD, Behavior
TapGram Tapgram Tapgram makes sending simple messages to your loved ones easy. Once you are set up, you won’t need to touch a keyboard to send messages to the people that you love. Instead, you create messages by tapping on images and the messages can be posted to your social media feed or sent to your friends and loved ones via email. In turn, friends and family can tap on pictures to send you a reply. You will need a phone, tablet, or a computer with a connection, and a free tapgram account. It comes with a quick start guide. This website is tablet & smartphone friendly. Add to your phone homescreen to use like a phone app. Free Website Communication
Touch Calendar Touch Calendar makes viewing your calendars easy. See your whole calendar at a glance. No more flipping between different calendar views. Touch Calendar does it all from one zoomable and scrollable view. This app is especially useful for people with attention problems who do better with fewer steps. $3.38 Android Organization
Unus Tactus (Touch. Locate. Call) Developed to assist people of all ages with mild cognitive and/or motor deficits by allowing you to have an easy to use cell phone, with a simple set up. It utilizes a one-touch photo dialing system to generate phone calls using phone numbers from your existing contacts or those that you import directly. $9.99 iOS Communication
Verbally Comprehensive Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) app for the iPad. This app enables real conversation for those who have challenges speaking. Just tap in what you want to say and Verbally speaks for you. *Premium features available with an in-app purchase. Free* iPad Communication, Speech
Visual Schedule Planner Customizable visual schedule iPad app that is designed to give you an audio/visual representation of the events in your day. In addition, events that require more support can be linked to an activity schedule or video clip. $14.99 iPad Organization
Voice4U Picture-based, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) application that helps you express your feelings, thoughts, actions, and needs. $59.99 iOSAndroid Communication, Speech
Voice Access Voice Access is an accessibility service that lets you control your device with spoken commands. It utilizes the power of Google’s Voice Search to help you control your device. It includes navigation functions, you can use your voice as a back button, home button, etc to move aorund. Additional commands includes scroll down, click next, and you can even type with it. Voice Access can be useful for people who have difficulty using a touchscreen due to paralysis, tremor, temporary injury, or other reasons. Assistance is using the app is available here. Free iOSAndroid Accessibility
Week Calendar Week Calendar is a user friendly and the all-round calendar app. Visualize your busy schedule using colors and emojis. Have a clear and detailed overview based on day, week, month or year level. Move your appointments by simply dragging, copying and pasting. It works with all your calendars including shared calendars. iCloud, Google Calendar, Yahoo! Calendar, Microsoft Outlook, Exchange ActiveSync, iCal, CalDAV, ICS subscription calendars are all supported. “Color coding permits me to visually see when I need to take a break. Also, it automatically adds in travel time; a failure on prior calendars. Also, I learned that I can update the WeekCal via Google or iCalendar if am using a PC or web at time of making appointment.” Free* iOS Organization
WheelMap This free app helps wheelchair users and their caregivers search and find wheelchair accessible places worldwide. Based on aggregated data from users with disabilities all over the globe, Wheelmap helps people with disabilities plan out trips and destinations based on their ability to access a building. For example, when choosing a restaurant to eat out, a user with a wheelchair might use Wheelmap to check for wheelchair accessibility prior to going. Free iOSAndroid Accessibility
Where Am I? View and share your location, including your city, zip code, telephone area code, and approximate street address as well as the times of sunrise and sunset and GPS latitude and longitude. Free Android Location
Word Warp Game with which you can create as many words as possible from a selection of letters. If you’re stuck, just press the “warp” button and it will help you out. Free iOS Brain Training

Pricing, availability, and features accurate as of the last update February 20th, 2018. 


Share with us

Technology is always changing. New iterations of mobile devices and apps are constantly being released. Please share with us what apps have and haven’t worked for you in the comment section below.

 

via Life-Changing Apps for People with Brain Injury | BrainLine

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[Abstract] Cognitive and Motor Recovery and Predictors of Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

Abstract

Objective

To explore the patterns of cognitive and motor recovery at four time points from admission to nine months post-discharge from IR and to investigate the association of therapeutic factors and pre- and post-discharge conditions with long-term outcomes.

Design

Secondary analysis of traumatic brain injury-practice based evidence (TBI-PBE) dataset.

Settings

Inpatient rehabilitation (IR) in Ontario, Canada.

Participants

A total of 85 patients with TBI consecutively admitted for IR between 2008 and 2011 and had data available from admission to nine months follow-up.

Interventions

Not applicable.

Main outcome measure

Functional Independence Measure-Rasch cognitive and motor scores at admission, discharge, three, and nine months post-discharge.

Results

Cognitive and motor recovery showed similar patterns of improvement with recovery up to three months but no significant change from three to nine months. Having fewer post-discharge health conditions was associated with better long-term cognitive scores (95% CI -13.06, -1.2) and added 9.9 % to the explanatory power of the model. More therapy time in complex occupational therapy activities (95% CI .02, .09) and fewer post-discharge health conditions (95% CI -19.5, -3.8) were significant predictors of better long-term motor function and added 14.3% and 7.2% to the explanatory power of the model, respectively.

Conclusion

Results of this study inform health care providers about the influence of the timing of IR on cognitive and motor recovery. In addition, it underlines the importance of making patients and families aware of residual health conditions following discharge from IR.

via Cognitive and Motor Recovery and Predictors of Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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