Posts Tagged brain

[TED Talk] The brain may be able to repair itself — with help | Jocelyne Bloch – YouTube

Through treating everything from strokes to car accident traumas, neurosurgeon Jocelyne Bloch knows the brain’s inability to repair itself all too well. But now, she suggests, she and her colleagues may have found the key to neural repair: Doublecortin-positive cells. Similar to stem cells, they are extremely adaptable and, when extracted from a brain, cultured and then re-injected in a lesioned area of the same brain, they can help repair and rebuild it. “With a little help,” Bloch says, “the brain may be able to help itself.”

via The brain may be able to repair itself — with help | Jocelyne Bloch – YouTube

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[WEB SITE] CT head scan: Uses, procedure, risks, and results

A computed tomography (CT) scan of the head is an imaging scan that uses X-rays to develop a 3D image of the skull, brain, and other related areas of the head.

CT scan of the head can provide more detail than a traditional X-ray, which is particularly useful when a doctor wants to check the blood vessels and soft tissues in the body.

In this article, we explain why a doctor may order a CT scan of the head and what a person can expect if they need to undergo this procedure.

When do people need a CT head scan?

a man having a CT head scan

A person may have a CT head scan after trauma to check for damage.

Some of the reasons why a doctor may order a head CT scan include:

  • looking for possible damage after trauma to the head, such as soft tissue injuries, brain bleeding, and bone injuries
  • assessing a person having stroke-like symptoms to see whether there are signs of a blood clot or brain bleeding
  • looking for a possible brain tumor or other brain abnormality
  • checking the effectiveness of medical treatments in shrinking a brain tumor
  • assessing birth conditions that cause the skull to form abnormally
  • evaluating a person with a history of hydrocephalus, a condition in which an accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid causes the enlargement of the brain ventricles

If a person is having brain-related symptoms, such as changes in personality or affected movement, a doctor may order a head CT scan to make sure that a brain abnormality is not the underlying cause.

Test procedure

A doctor should provide specific instructions for the day of the CT scan. These will include whether or not to refrain from eating or drinking for a certain period before the scan.

The doctor will also usually ask the person to take off any jewelry, removable dental work, or hairpins because these can affect the scan’s images.

Sometimes, people who take metformin (Glucophage) may need to refrain from using it for a few days before getting a CT scan with contrast dye. The combination of this drug and the dye can cause a severe reaction in some individuals.

Contrast dye is a substance that the person may receive by injection before a scan. It makes certain areas of the body show up more easily on a scan. However, not all CT scans require contrast dye.

The person will often complete a checklist before undergoing the scan. The checklist includes a medical history of conditions that can affect a person’s health, such as kidney disease, heart diseaseasthma, and thyroid problems. Some health issues may affect a person’s ability to receive intravenous (IV) contrast.

The scanner usually looks like a circle shaped machine that has a hole in its center. In the center, there is a bed on which a person lies during the procedure. The scanner is usually open, which helps the person feel less claustrophobic.

radiology technician may ask the person to change into a gown before going into the room with the CT scanner.

Before the scan, a radiology technician may put an IV line in place, usually in the person’s arm, if the scan uses contrast dye.

During the scan, the radiology technician will talk to the person via a speaker to let them know them when the scan is starting. The scanner will direct X-ray beams at the person’s head. The X-rays will come back to the scanner, transmitting the images back to a computer.

After the initial scan, the radiology technician may deliver the IV contrast material. They will then restart the CT scan. The technologist will review the images to ensure that they are of high quality and are free of blurring in any key areas.

The average CT scan of the head takes no more than 10 minutes.

CT head scans in children

a doctor preparing a child for a CT scan.

Children are sensitive to radiation, so a doctor may only order a CT scan when necessary to confirm a diagnosis.

As a CT scan is relatively quick, many children can stay still long enough for the technician to complete the scan. However, if a child cannot remain still for the scan — as is the case for babies — it may be necessary to perform the procedure with the child under anesthesia.

Children are typically more sensitive to radiation than adults. As a result, doctors tend to reserve CT scans for when they are necessary to make a diagnosis. A radiology technician can usually adjust the settings on a CT scanner to deliver the lowest possible dose of radiation.

Risks

The CT scan is a painless, noninvasive procedure, and doctors generally consider it to be safe. However, it carries some possible risks.

As a CT scan exposes a person to radiation, there is a risk that the person could develop cancer from excessive radiation doses. However, the risks for this after one CT head scan are minimal. A person can ask their doctor if they should be concerned about the radiation dose from a CT head scan.

Doctors will usually recommend that women avoid CT scans during pregnancy. However, as one CT scan is unlikely to pose a significant risk, a doctor can offer advice on whether the benefits outweigh the risks.

Read about the safety of X-rays here.

A CT scan can be noisy. Sometimes, this noise or the fear of being in an enclosed space can provoke anxiety in a person. For this reason, doctors may sometimes give a person sedating medicines before they go into the CT scanner.

If a person receives a contrast dye during the procedure, they could be at risk of experiencing an allergic reaction to the dye.

Contrast dye can also cause other symptoms that may be temporarily unpleasant but are not an allergic reaction. These may include a warm feeling throughout the body, a burning sensation, or a metallic taste in the mouth. Sometimes, a doctor may prescribe a steroid or advise a person to take diphenhydramine (Benadryl) before undergoing the scan.

Results

A medical specialist called a radiologist will examine the imaging scans, looking for any abnormalities in the brain and surrounding tissues. They will write a report of their findings and send it to the doctor who ordered the scan.

If a person is in the hospital and undergoing the scan as an emergency, the radiologist will report any immediately concerning results as quickly as possible.

CT scan vs. MRI scan

a doctor showing a patient information on an ipad

A person’s doctor can advise on which type of scan is best to diagnose a certain condition.

While a CT scan is helpful in displaying some aspects of the head and brain, an MRI scan sometimes has higher sensitivity. As a result, it may be more effective in revealing disease processes in the brain and inflammation in the membranes covering the brain, which are known as the meninges.

Doctors will consider the advantages of each type of scan for scanning the head. The benefits of a CT scan compared with an MRI scan include:

  • A CT scan is faster than an MRI scan, so doctors usually use it for emergencies.
  • A CT scan generally costs less than an MRI scan.
  • Doctors can perform a CT scan on a person who has metal devices, such as a pacemaker, nerve stimulator, or cochlear implant. A person with these devices cannot undergo an MRI because of the magnet’s attraction to metal.

The benefits of an MRI scan compared with a CT scan include:

  • An MRI does not involve radiation exposure, making it preferable for children who may require multiple scans.
  • MRI scans can show soft tissues and structures that bone may hide in a CT scan.
  • A person requires a smaller amount of IV contrast for an MRI scan than for a CT scan.

People can talk to their doctor to evaluate the aspects of each scan and determine which is most appropriate for them.

Summary

A CT scan of the head is useful for helping a doctor assess damage after an accident or head trauma. It also allows them to look for brain abnormalities, such as tumors and skull defects.

Doctors consider CT scans to be relatively safe and noninvasive procedures, even though they involve exposure to radiation. People can discuss any possible risks with their doctor.

 

via CT head scan: Uses, procedure, risks, and results

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[TED Talk] Understanding PTSD’s Effects on Brain, Body, and Emotions | Janet Seahorn | TEDxCSU – YouTube

PTSD disrupts the lives of average individuals as well as combat veterans who have served their country. The person experiencing the trauma often then impacts the lives of his/her family, friends, and workplaces. PTSD does not distinguish between race, age or gender and often goes undiagnosed. Even with proper diagnosis, many individuals do not know where to turn to get help. Society needs to understand the aftermath of trauma especially combat trauma and how to prepare for warriors when they return home. Janet Seahorn, Ph.D has been a teacher, administrator, and consultant for over thirty years. She currently teaches a variety of classes on neuroscience and literacy as an adjunct professor for Colorado State University in Fort Collins, CO. Jan has a Ph.D in Human Development and Organizational Systems. Her background includes an in-depth understanding of human development and neuroscience research as well as effective practices in organizational systems and change. She conducts workshops on the neuroscience of learning and memory, the effects of “at-risk” environments (i.e., poverty), brain development, and researched-based instructional practices. Jan has worked with many organizations in the business and educational communities in creating and sustaining healthy, dynamic environments. Dr. Seahorn has researched and studied the effects of trauma on the brain and how excessive or extreme trauma can impact changes in the brain’s neuro network and how that change impacts behaviors in s This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

via Understanding PTSD’s Effects on Brain, Body, and Emotions | Janet Seahorn | TEDxCSU – YouTube

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[WEB PAGE] Rehabilitation After Traumatic Brain Injury – Johns Hopkins Medicine

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when a sudden injury causes damage to your brain. A “closed head injury” may cause brain damage if something hits your head hard but doesn’t break through your skull. A “penetrating head injury” occurs when an object breaks through your skull and enters your brain.

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Symptoms that may occur after TBI may include:

  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions
  • Loss of coordination
  • Slurred speech
  • Poor concentration
  • Memory problems
  • Personality changes

According to the CDC, the leading cause of TBI is falls, particularly for young children and adults over 65. Other common causes of TBI include accidental blunt force trauma, motor vehicle accidents, and violent assaults.

If you have had a TBI, rehabilitation (or rehab) will be an important part of your recovery. Rehab can take many forms depending on your needs, and might include physical, occupational, and speech therapy, as well as psychiatric care and social support. All of these are designed to help you recover from the effects of your injury as much as possible.

Why might I need rehab after traumatic brain injury?

Rehab may help:

  • Improve your ability to function at home and in your community
  • Help treat the mental and physical problems caused by TBI
  • Provide social and emotional support
  • Help you adapt to changes as they occur during your recovery

Rehab can also help prevent complications of TBI such as:

  • Blood clots
  • Pain
  • Pressure ulcers, also called bedsores
  • Breathing problems and pneumonia
  • A drop in blood pressure when you move around
  • Muscle weakness and muscle spasm
  • Bowel and bladder problems
  • Reproductive and sexual function problems

What are the risks of rehab after traumatic brain injury?

Rehab after a TBI is not likely to cause problems. But there is always a risk that parts of treatment such as physical or occupational therapy might lead to new injuries or make existing symptoms or injuries worse if not done properly.

That’s why it is important to work closely with your rehab specialist who will take steps to help prevent problems. But they may still happen. Be sure to discuss any concerns with your healthcare provider before rehab.

How do I get ready for rehab after traumatic brain injury?

Before you can start rehab, you must get care and treatment for the early effects of TBI. This might include:

  • Emergency treatment for head and any other injuries
  • Intensive care treatment
  • Surgery to repair brain or skull injuries
  • Recovery in the hospital
  • Transfer to a rehabilitation hospital

What happens during rehab after traumatic brain injury?

Every person’s needs and abilities after TBI are different. You will have a rehab program designed especially for you. Your program is likely to involve many types of healthcare providers. It’s important to have one central person you can talk to. This person is often called your case coordinator.

Over time, your program will likely change as your needs and abilities change.

Rehab can take place in various settings. You, your case coordinator, and your family should pick the setting that works best for you. Possible settings include:

  • Inpatient rehab hospital
  • Outpatient rehab hospital
  • Home-based rehab
  • A comprehensive day program
  • An independent living center

Your individual program may include any or all of these treatments:

  • Physical therapy
  • Physical medicine
  • Occupational therapy
  • Psychiatric care
  • Psychological care
  • Speech and language therapy
  • Social support

You have many options for rehab therapy, and the type of rehab therapy that you need will be determined by your care team. Your care team will assess your needs and abilities. This assessment may include:

  • Bowel and bladder control
  • Speech ability
  • Swallowing ability
  • Strength and coordination
  • Ability to understand language
  • Mental and behavioral state
  • Social support needs

What happens after rehab for traumatic brain injury?

How long your rehab lasts and how much follow-up care you will need afterwards depends on how severe your brain damage was and how well you respond to therapy. Some people may be able to return to the same level of ability they had before TBI. Others need lifetime care.

Some long-term effects of TBI can show up years later. You may be at higher risk long-term for problems such as Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and other forms of dementia.

After rehab you may be given these instructions:

  • Symptoms and signs that you should call your healthcare provider about
  • Symptoms and signs that are to be expected
  • Advice on safety and self-care
  • Advice on alcohol and drug use
  • Community support resources available to you

Your primary care provider should be given all the records and recommendations from your therapy team to help ensure that you continue to get the right care.

Next steps

Before you agree to the test or the procedure make sure you know:

  • The name of the test or procedure
  • The reason you are having the test or procedure
  • What results to expect and what they mean
  • The risks and benefits of the test or procedure
  • What the possible side effects or complications are
  • When and where you are to have the test or procedure
  • Who will do the test or procedure and what that person’s qualifications are
  • What would happen if you did not have the test or procedure
  • Any alternative tests or procedures to think about
  • When and how will you get the results
  • Who to call after the test or procedure if you have questions or problems
  • How much will you have to pay for the test or procedure

via Rehabilitation After Traumatic Brain Injury | Johns Hopkins Medicine

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[VIDEO] Understanding Brain Injury. – Videos

via Understanding Brain Injury

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[VIDEO] Traumatic Brain Injuries: Effects of damage to different lobes of the brain – YouTube

http://www.ericratinoff.com Brain Injury Attorney Eric Ratinoff talks about traumatic brain injury – an area of personal injury he is proud to represent. He is always looking for opportunities to learn and share education on this topic, and he has created this video podcast on the areas of the brain and how they are affected by injury. Areas of the brain discussed are the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, temporal lobe, cerebellum and brain stem. For more information about Traumatic Brain Injury, visit our online TBI Resource Center at http://www.ericratinoff.com/personal-…

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[WEB PAGE] Chemical imbalance in the brain: Myths and facts

Everything you need to know about chemical imbalances in the brain

Last reviewed 

A chemical imbalance in the brain occurs when a person has either too little or too much of certain neurotransmitters.

Neurotransmitters are the chemical messengers that pass information between nerve cells. Examples of neurotransmitters include serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine.

People sometimes call serotonin and dopamine the “happy hormones” because of the roles that they play in regulating mood and emotions.

A popular hypothesis is that mental health disorders, such as depression and anxiety, develop as a result of chemical imbalances in the brain.

While this theory may hold some truth, it runs the risk of oversimplifying mental illnesses. In reality, mood disorders and mental health illnesses are highly complex conditions that affect 46.6 million adults living in the United States alone.

In this article, we discuss conditions with links to chemical imbalances in the brain, myths surrounding this theory, possible treatment options, and when to see a doctor.

Myths

a man looking sad because he is experiencing a Chemical imbalance in the brain

Many factors may contribute to a person’s risk of mental illness.

Although chemical imbalances in the brain seem to have an association with mood disorders and mental health conditions, researchers have not proven that chemical imbalances are the initial cause of these conditions.

Other factors that contribute to mental health conditions include:

  • genetics and family history
  • life experiences, such as a history of physical, psychological, or emotional abuse
  • having a history of alcohol or illicit drug use
  • taking certain medications
  • psychosocial factors, such as external circumstances that lead to feelings of isolation and loneliness

While some studies have identified links between distinct chemical imbalances and specific mental health conditions, researchers do not know how people develop chemical imbalances in the first place.

Current biological testing also cannot reliably verify a mental health condition. Doctors do not, therefore, diagnose mental health conditions by testing for chemical imbalances in the brain. Instead, they make a diagnosis based on a person’s symptoms and the findings of a physical examination.

What conditions are linked to chemical imbalances?

Research has linked chemical imbalances to some mental health conditions, including:

Depression

Depression, also called clinical depression, is a mood disorder that affects many aspects of a person’s life, from their thoughts and feelings to their sleeping and eating habits.

Although some research links chemical imbalances in the brain to depression symptoms, scientists argue that this is not the whole picture.

For example, researchers point out that if depression were solely due to chemical imbalances, treatments that target neurotransmitters, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), should work faster.

The symptoms of depression vary widely among individuals, but they can include:

  • persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, anxiety, or apathy
  • persistent feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or pessimism
  • loss of interest in formerly enjoyable activities or hobbies
  • difficulty concentrating, making decisions, or remembering things
  • irritability
  • restlessness or hyperactivity
  • insomnia or sleeping too much
  • changes in appetite and weight
  • physical aches, cramps, or digestive problems
  • thoughts of suicide

It is possible to develop depression at any age, but symptoms usually begin when a person is in their teenage years or early 20s and 30s. Women are more likely than men to experience depression.

Many different types of depression exist. These include:

The dramatic hormonal changes that take place after giving birth are among the factors that can increase a woman’s risk of developing postpartum depression. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 10–15% of women experience postpartum depression.

Bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder that causes alternating periods of mania and depression. These periods can last anywhere from a few days to a few years.

Mania refers to a state of having abnormally high energy. A person experiencing a manic episode may exhibit the following characteristics:

  • feeling elated or euphoric
  • having unusually high levels of energy
  • participating in several activities at once
  • leaving tasks unfinished
  • talking extremely fast
  • being agitated or irritable
  • frequently coming into conflict with others
  • engaging in risky behavior, such as gambling or drinking excessive quantities of alcohol
  • a tendency to experience physical injuries

Severe episodes of mania or depression can cause psychotic symptoms, such as delusions and hallucinations.

People who have bipolar disorder can experience distinct changes in their mood and energy levels. They may have an increased risk of substance abuse and a higher incidence of certain medical conditions, such as:

The exact cause of bipolar disorder remains unknown. Researchers believe that changes in the dopamine receptors — resulting in altered dopamine levels in the brain — may contribute to the symptoms of bipolar disorder.

Anxiety

pensive woman

A person with an anxiety disorder may experience excessive worry.

However, people who have an anxiety disorder often experience persistent anxiety or excessive worry that worsens in response to stressful situations.

According to the authors of a 2015 review article, evidence from neuroscience research suggests that the gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmitter may play a crucial role in anxiety disorders.

The GABA neurotransmitter reduces neuronal activity in the amygdala, which is the part of the brain that stores and processes emotional information.

GABA is not the only neurotransmitter that anxiety disorders involve. Other neurotransmitters that may contribute to these disorders include:

  • serotonin
  • endocannabinoids
  • oxytocin
  • corticotropin-releasing hormone
  • opioid peptides
  • neuropeptide Y

Treatment

Doctors can prescribe a class of medications called psychotropics to rebalance the concentration of particular neurochemicals in the brain.

Doctors use these medications to treat a range of mental health conditions, including depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder.

Examples of psychotropics include:

  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine (Prozac), citalopram (Celexa), and sertraline (Zoloft).
  • Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), including venlafaxine (Effexor XR), duloxetine (Cymbalta), and desvenlafaxine (Pristiq).
  • Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), such as amitriptyline (Elavil), desipramine (Norpramin), and nortriptyline (Pamelor).
  • Benzodiazepines, including clonazepam (Klonopin) and lorazepam (Ativan).

According to 2017 researchantidepressants improved symptoms in an estimated 40–60% of individuals with moderate-to-severe depression within 6–8 weeks.

While some people experience reduced symptoms within a few weeks, it can sometimes take months for others to feel the effects.

Different psychotropics have varying side effects. People can discuss the benefits and risks of these medications with their doctor.

The side effects of psychotropic medications can include:

Suicide prevention

  • If you know someone at immediate risk of self-harm, suicide, or hurting another person:
  • Call 911 or the local emergency number.
  • Stay with the person until professional help arrives.
  • Remove any weapons, medications, or other potentially harmful objects.
  • Listen to the person without judgment.
  • If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, a prevention hotline can help. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours a day at 1-800-273-8255.

When to see a doctor

man talking to doctor in her office both smiling

If a person experiences anxiety and mood changes every day for longer than 2 weeks, they should consider speaking to their doctor.

These symptoms should not cause alarm if they are mild and resolve within a few days.

However, people may wish to consider speaking with a doctor or trained mental health professional if they experience emotional, cognitive, or physical symptoms every day for more than 2 weeks.

Summary

Mental health is complex and multifaceted, and numerous factors can affect a person’s mental well-being.

Although chemical imbalances in the brain may not directly cause mental health disorders, medications that influence the concentration of neurotransmitters can sometimes provide symptom relief.

People who experience signs and symptoms of a mental health problem for more than 2 weeks may wish to speak to a doctor.

 

via Chemical imbalance in the brain: Myths and facts

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[WEB SITE] Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good for Your Brain

People are losing the brain benefits of writing by hand as the practice becomes less common

Illustration: Kieran Blakey

NNot so long ago, putting pen to paper was a fundamental feature of daily life. Journaling and diary-keeping were commonplace, and people exchanged handwritten letters with friends, loved ones, and business associates.

While longhand communication is more time-consuming and onerous, there’s evidence that people may in some cases lose out when they abandon handwriting for keyboard-generated text.

Psychologists have long understood that personal, emotion-focused writing can help people recognize and come to terms with their feelings. Since the 1980s, studies have found that “the writing cure,” which normally involves writing about one’s feelings every day for 15 to 30 minutes, can lead to measurable physical and mental health benefits. These benefits include everything from lower stress and fewer depression symptoms to improved immune function. And there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing.

A commonly cited 1999 study in the Journal of Traumatic Stress found that writing about a stressful life experience by hand, as opposed to typing about it, led to higher levels of self-disclosure and translated to greater therapeutic benefits. It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today, many of whom grew up with computers and are more accustomed to expressing themselves via typed text. But experts who study handwriting say there’s reason to believe something is lost when people abandon the pen for the keyboard.

Psychologists have long understood that personal, emotion-focused writing can help people recognize and come to terms with their feelings.

“When we write a letter of the alphabet, we form it component stroke by component stroke, and that process of production involves pathways in the brain that go near or through parts that manage emotion,” says Virginia Berninger, a professor emerita of education at the University of Washington. Hitting a fully formed letter on a keyboard is a very different sort of task — one that doesn’t involve these same brain pathways. “It’s possible that there’s not the same connection to the emotional part of the brain” when people type, as opposed to writing in longhand, Berninger says.

Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information. A 2017 study in the journal Frontiers in Psychology found that brain regions associated with learning are more active when people completed a task by hand, as opposed to on a keyboard. The authors of that study say writing by hand may promote “deep encoding” of new information in ways that keyboard writing does not. And other researchers have argued that writing by hand promotes learning and cognitive development in ways keyboard writing can’t match.

The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk, at least in some contexts. A 2014 study in the journal Psychological Science found that students who took notes in longhand tested higher on measures of learning and comprehension than students who took notes on laptops.

“The primary advantage of longhand notes was that it slowed people down,” says Daniel Oppenheimer, co-author of the study and a professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. While the students who typed could take down what they heard word for word, “people who took longhand notes could not write fast enough to take verbatim notes — instead they were forced to rephrase the content in their own words,” Oppenheimer says. “To do that, people had to think deeply about the material and actually understand the arguments. This helped them learn the material better.”

Slowing down and writing by hand may come with other advantages. Oppenheimer says that because typing is fast, it tends to cause people to employ a less diverse group of words. Writing longhand allows people more time to come up with the most appropriate word, which may facilitate better self-expression. He says there’s also speculation that longhand note-taking can help people in certain situations form closer connections. One example: “A doctor who takes notes on a patient’s symptoms by longhand may build more rapport with patients than doctors who are typing into a computer,” he says. Also, a lot Berninger’s NIH-funded work found that learning to write first in print and then in cursive helps young people develop critical reading and thinking skills.

Finally, there’s a mountain of research that suggests online forms of communication are more toxic than offline dialogue. Most of the researchers who study online communication speculate that a lack of face-to-face interaction and a sense of invisibility are to blame for the nasty and brutish quality of many online interactions. But the impersonal nature of keyboard-generated text may also, in some small way, be contributing to the observed toxicity. When a person writes by hand, they have to invest more time and energy than they would with a keyboard. And handwriting, unlike typed text, is unique to each individual. This is why people usually value a handwritten note more highly than an email or text, Berninger says. If words weren’t quite so easy to produce, it’s possible that people would treat them — and maybe each other — with a little more care.

via Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good for Your Brain – Elemental

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[Infographic] MUSIC & THE BRAIN

 

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[Infographic] The Effects of Music on the Brain

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