Posts Tagged BWSTT

[Abstract] Effect of functional electrical stimulation plus body weight-supported treadmill training for gait rehabilitation in patients with poststroke – a retrospective case-matched study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Functional electrical stimulation (FES) plus body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) provide effective gait training for poststroke patients with abnormal gait. These features promote a successful active motor relearning of ambulation in stroke survivors.

AIM:

This is a retrospective study to assess the effect of FES plus BWSTT for gait rehabilitation in patients poststroke.

DESIGN:

A retrospective case-matched study.

SETTING:

Participants were recruited from a rehabilitation department in an acute university-affiliated hospital.

POPULATION:

Ninety patients poststroke from Yue Bei People’s Hospital underwent BWSTT (A: control group) were compared to an equal number of cross-matched patients who received FES plus BWSTT (B: FES plus BWSTT group).

METHODS:

While B group received FES for 45 minutes plus BSWTT for 30 minutes in the program, group A received time-matched BWSTT alone. The walking speed, step length, step cadence, Fugl-Meyer lower-limb scale (LL-FMA), composite spasticity scale (CSS), 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), Tinetti Balance Test (TBT) and nerve physiology testing were collected before and after intervention.

RESULTS:

One hundred and eighty patients with poststroke abnormal gait were chosen. There were significant differences in walking speed, step length, step cadence, LL-FMA, CSS, TBT, and 10MWT between baseline and post-intervention (P<0.05). There were significant differences in walking speed, step length, step cadence, LL-FMA, CSS, TBT, and 10MWT between two groups at the end of the eighth week (P<0.05), but not at baseline (P>0.05). In comparison with group A, the peak of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude increased, the latency was shortened, and the conduction velocity of sensory nerve (SCV) and motor nerve (MCV) was significantly increased in the group B (P < 0.05). No adverse events occurred during the study.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that FES plus BWSTT could be more effective than BWSTT alone in the improvement of gait, balance, spasticity, and function of the lower limb in patients poststroke.

CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT:

Introduce effective rehabilitation strategies for poststroke patients with abnormal gait.

 

via Effect of functional electrical stimulation plus body weight-supported treadmill training for gait rehabilitation in patients with poststroke-a ret… – PubMed – NCBI

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[WEB SITE] Gait Trainer™ 3 – Biodex

More than just a treadmill…It is the most important improvement to gait training since the parallel bars.

The Gait Trainer 3 provides audio and visual biofeedback of step length and step speed

The Biodex Gait Trainer™ 3 is more than a treadmill. It is designed with an instrumented deck that issues both audio and visual real-time biofeedback to prompt patients into their correct gait pattern. Step length, step speed and right-to-left time distribution (step symmetry) are directly addressed; patient footfall is compared to desired footfall step after step, both on the display in real time and documented in an easy to read histogram.

The Biodex Gait Trainer is quiet, non-intimidating and allows the therapist to get in there and treat their patients. Real goals are monitored and progress reported. Objective documentation, with comparison to age- and gender-based normative data, helps prove need and document outcomes to family, referring physicians and insurance providers.

The Biodex Gait Trainer 3, with or without the Unweighing System or FreeStep for BWSTT, is suitable for all rehabilitation pathologies. Biodex has recently published Body Weight Support Treadmill Training (BWSTT) with Transition to Over Ground Ambulation: A Clinical Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Neurological Conditions using Biodex Unweighing System and Gait Trainer. The document classifies the neurologically involved patient, then steps the user through the various phases of recovery for profound,moderate and minimal neurological impairments.

Treadmill Plus… The Gait Trainer 3 also serves as a traditional treadmill, with all the features and benefits of the Biodex RTM600 Rehabilitation Treadmill.

Gait Training SystemGAIT TRAINER 3 + UNWEIGHING
The Biodex Gait Training System

The Gait Trainer provides audio and visual biofeedback of step length and step speed. The Unweighing Support System provides assistance, helping patients regain their confidence, their strength and their stride. The Unweighing System, combined with the Gait Trainer 3 allows every patient the opportunity to get an early start on rehabilitation.

Source: Gait Trainer™ 3 – Treadmills – Physical Medicine | Biodex

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[ARTICLE] Rehabilitation with Poststroke Motor Recovery: A Review with a Focus on Neural Plasticity – Full Text HTML

Abstract

Motor recovery after stroke is related to neural plasticity, which involves developing new neuronal interconnections, acquiring new functions, and compensating for impairment. However, neural plasticity is impaired in the stroke-affected hemisphere. Therefore, it is important that motor recovery therapies facilitate neural plasticity to compensate for functional loss. Stroke rehabilitation programs should include meaningful, repetitive, intensive, and task-specific movement training in an enriched environment to promote neural plasticity and motor recovery. Various novel stroke rehabilitation techniques for motor recovery have been developed based on basic science and clinical studies of neural plasticity. However, the effectiveness of rehabilitative interventions among patients with stroke varies widely because the mechanisms underlying motor recovery are heterogeneous. Neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies have been developed to evaluate the heterogeneity of mechanisms underlying motor recovery for effective rehabilitation interventions after stroke. Here, we review novel stroke rehabilitation techniques associated with neural plasticity and discuss individualized strategies to identify appropriate therapeutic goals, prevent maladaptive plasticity, and maximize functional gain in patients with stroke.

Continue —> Rehabilitation with Poststroke Motor Recovery: A Review with a Focus on Neural Plasticity.

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[REVIEW] Rehabilitation with Poststroke Motor Recovery: A Review with a Focus on Neural Plasticity – Full Text

…Motor recovery after stroke is related to neural plasticity, which involves developing new neuronal interconnections, acquiring new functions, and compensating for impairment. However, neural plasticity is impaired in the stroke-affected hemisphere. Therefore, it is important that motor recovery therapies facilitate neural plasticity to compensate for functional loss. Stroke rehabilitation programs should include meaningful, repetitive, intensive, and task-specific movement training in an enriched environment to promote neural plasticity and motor recovery. Various novel stroke rehabilitation techniques for motor recovery have been developed based on basic science and clinical studies of neural plasticity. However, the effectiveness of rehabilitative interventions among patients with stroke varies widely because the mechanisms underlying motor recovery are heterogeneous. Neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies have been developed to evaluate the heterogeneity of mechanisms underlying motor recovery for effective rehabilitation interventions after stroke. Here, we review novel stroke rehabilitation techniques associated with neural plasticity and discuss individualized strategies to identify appropriate therapeutic goals, prevent maladaptive plasticity, and maximize functional gain in patients with stroke…

via Rehabilitation with Poststroke Motor Recovery: A Review with a Focus on Neural Plasticity.

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