Posts Tagged cerebrovascular disorders

[ ARTICLE] Neuroplasticity in post-stroke gait recovery and noninvasive brain stimulation – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Gait disorders drastically affect the quality of life of stroke survivors, making post-stroke rehabilitation an important research focus. Noninvasive brain stimulation has potential in facilitating neuroplasticity and improving post-stroke gait impairment. However, a large inter-individual variability in the response to noninvasive brain stimulation interventions has been increasingly recognized. We first review the neurophysiology of human gait and post-stroke neuroplasticity for gait recovery, and then discuss how noninvasive brain stimulation techniques could be utilized to enhance gait recovery. While post-stroke neuroplasticity for gait recovery is characterized by use-dependent plasticity, it evolves over time, is idiosyncratic, and may develop maladaptive elements. Furthermore, noninvasive brain stimulation has limited reach capability and is facilitative-only in nature. Therefore, we recommend that noninvasive brain stimulation be used adjunctively with rehabilitation training and other concurrent neuroplasticity facilitation techniques. Additionally, when noninvasive brain stimulation is applied for the rehabilitation of gait impairment in stroke survivors, stimulation montages should be customized according to the specific types of neuroplasticity found in each individual. This could be done using multiple mapping techniques.

Introduction

The American Heart Association estimates that approximately 795,000 individuals in the United States have a stroke each year (Go et al., 2014). A lack of mobility is the main obstacle for stroke survivors seeking to regain daily living independence and social integration. Thus, restoring impaired gait is one of the major goals of post-stroke rehabilitation. Recently, traditional rehabilitation techniques have been augmented by the use of a new methodology, noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS), which facilitates neuroplasticity. To better understand the use of NIBS, this paper reviews literature regarding the neurophysiology of human gait, poststroke neuroplasticity in the motor control system underlying gait, and finally, approaches for using NIBS to enhance gait recovery.

Neurophysiology of Human Gait

Involvement of the cerebral cortices: In functional neuroimaging studies of human walking, the premotor cortex (PMC) and the supplementary motor cortex (SMC) are activated prior to step onset (Huppert et al., 2013). However, lesions in these two areas often lead to problems with gait initiation and the negotiation of narrow passages (Jahn et al., 2004), indicating their importance in the initiation and planning of walking. Furthermore, corticospinal inputs significantly facilitate muscular responses in the lower limbs, especially during the swing phase of the step cycle (Pijnappels et al., 1998). These observations suggest that cortical outputs play a critical role in the modulation of lower limb locomotion…

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