Posts Tagged chronic

[ARTICLE] Functional Electrical Stimulation with Augmented Feedback Training Improves Gait and Functional Performance in Individuals with Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial – Full Text

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of the FES-gait with augmented feedback training to the FES alone on the gait and functional performance in individuals with chronic stroke.
Methods: This study used a pretest and posttest randomized control design. The subjects who signed the agreement were randomly divided into 12 experimental groups and 12 control groups. The experimental groups performed two types of augmented feedback training (knowledge of performance and knowledge of results) together with FES, and the control group performed FES on the TA and GM without augmented feedback and then walked for 30 minutes for 40 meters. Both the experimental groups and the control groups received training five times a week for four weeks.
Results: The groups that received the FES with augmented feedback training significantly showed a greater improvement in single limb  support (SLS) and gait velocity than the groups that received FES alone. In addition, timed up and go (TUG) test and six minute walk test (6MWT) showed a significant improvement in the groups that received FES with augmented feedback compared to the groups that received FES alone.
Conclusion: Compared with the existing FES gait training, augmented feedback showed improvements in gait parameters, walking ability, and dynamic balance. The augmented feedback will be an important method that can provide motivation for motor learning to stroke patients.

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[REVIEW] Photobiomodulation for Traumatic Brain Injury and Stroke – Abstract

Abstract

There is a notable lack of therapeutic alternatives for what is fast becoming a global epidemic of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Photobiomodulation (PBM) employs red or near-infrared (NIR) light (600–1100nm) to stimulate healing, protect tissue from dying, increase mitochondrial function, improve blood flow, and tissue oxygenation. PBM can also act to reduce swelling, increase antioxidants, decrease inflammation, protect against apoptosis, and modulate microglial activation state. All these mechanisms of action strongly suggest that PBM delivered to the head should be beneficial in cases of both acute and chronic TBI. Most reports have used NIR light either from lasers or from light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Many studies in small animal models of acute TBI have found positive effects on neurological function, learning and memory, and reduced inflammation and cell death in the brain. There is evidence that PBM can help the brain repair itself by stimulating neurogenesis, upregulating BDNF synthesis, and encouraging synaptogenesis. In healthy human volunteers (including students and healthy elderly women), PBM has been shown to increase regional cerebral blood flow, tissue oxygenation, and improve memory, mood, and cognitive function. Clinical studies have been conducted in patients suffering from the chronic effects of TBI. There have been reports showing improvement in executive function, working memory, and sleep. Functional magnetic resonance imaging has shown modulation of activation in intrinsic brain networks likely to be damaged in TBI (default mode network and salience network).

via Photobiomodulation for Traumatic Brain Injury and Stroke – Hamblin – 2017 – Journal of Neuroscience Research – Wiley Online Library

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[BOOK Chapter] Hand Rehabilitation after Chronic Brain Damage: Effectiveness, Usability and Acceptance of Technological Devices: A Pilot Study – Full Text

By Marta Rodríguez-Hernández, Carmen Fernández-Panadero, Olga López-Martín and Begoña Polonio-López
DOI: 10.5772/67532

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via Hand Rehabilitation after Chronic Brain Damage: Effectiveness, Usability and Acceptance of Technological Devices: A Pilot Study | InTechOpen

 

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[Abstract] Effectiveness of the conductive educational approach added to conventional physiotherapy in the improvement of gait parameters of poststroke patients: randomized-controlled pilot study.

Abstract

Our objective was to assess the benefits of the conductive education (CE) approach added to conventional physiotherapy in gait functions of poststroke, hemiparetic patients. A randomized-controlled trial was designed in a rehabilitation clinic. Late and chronic poststroke patients with gait disturbances (n=17, median age: 55 years, range: 41-72 years) were enrolled in the study. All patients received conventional physiotherapy. However, patients of only one group took part in therapy on the basis of the CE approach. The gait parameters, semiobjective outcome measures, functional independence measure, and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health domains were collected. The effectiveness of the CE approach was underlined by those outcome measures that were only significant (P≤0.05) in the conductive group: functional independence measure motor subscale; maintaining body position and walking long distances; and muscle strength in some muscle groups. The results suggest that CE could have an additive effect on gait improvement of stroke patients.

via Effectiveness of the conductive educational approach added to conventional physiotherapy in the improvement of gait parameters of poststroke patien… – PubMed – NCBI

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[ARTICLE] EFFECT OF WEIGHTED HAND MOVEMENTS ON HAND FUNCTION IN CHRONIC STROKE PATIENTS – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Background: Hand dysfunction is a common problem of stroke patients and it is the main cause of impairment of the upper limb. Finding new method to improve hand performance will decrease the disability of chronic stroke patients. Aim of the study: to study the effect of bilateral hand training with weight on the non paretic hand on the hand performance and time of performance in chronic stroke patients.

Materials and Methods: Thirty left chronic stroke patients participated in this study. The patients were assigned randomly into two equal groups. Group one (G1) received unilateral hand training and group two (G2) received bilateral hand training with weight on non affected hand. Both groups assessed two times before starting training program and after two months of training by Fugl meyer assessment scale, Wolf motor function test and hand dynamometer for the motor performance, time of performance and hand grip respectively.

Results: the patients in G2 showed significant improvement in the hand performance (P<.0001) and significant decrease in the time of performance (P<.001) and also significant improvement of hand grip (P<.0001).

Conclusion: Bilateral hand movement with weight on the non affected hand has a significant effect on improving hand performance and decreasing the time of performance and increasing hand grip than unilateral hand movement.

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[ARTICLE] Hemiparetic Stroke Rehabilitation Using Avatar and Electrical Stimulation Based on Non-invasive Brain Computer Interface – Full Text

Abstract
Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been employed in rehabilitation training for post-stroke patients. Patients in the chronic stage, and/or with severe paresis, are particularly challenging for conventional rehabilitation. We present results from two such patients who participated in BCI training with first-person avatar feedback. Five assessments were conducted to assess any behavioural changes after the intervention, including the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer assessment (UE-FMA) and 9 hole-peg test (9HPT). Patient 1 (P1) increased his UE-FMA score from 25 to 46 points after the intervention. He could not perform the 9HPT in the first session. After the 18th session, he was able to perform the 9HPT and reduced the time from 10 min 22 sec to 2 min 53 sec. Patient 2 (P2) increased her UE-FMA from 17 to 28 points after the intervention. She could not perform the 9HPT throughout the training session. However, she managed to complete the test in 17 min 17 sec during the post-assessment session.
These results show that the feasibility of this BCI approach with chronic patients with severe paresis, and further support the growing consensus that these types of tools might develop into a new paradigm for rehabilitation tool for stroke patients. However, the results are from only two chronic stroke patients. This approach should be furthe validated in broader randomized controlled studies involving more patients.

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[Abstract] Virtual Rehabilitation through Nintendo Wii in Poststroke Patients: Follow-Up

Objective

To evaluate in the follow-up the sensory-motor recovery and quality of life patients 2 months after completion of the Nintendo Wii console intervention and determine whether learning retention was obtained through the technique.

Methods

Five hemiplegics patients participated in the study, of whom 3 were male with an average age of 54.8 years (SD = 4.6). Everyone practiced Nintendo Wii therapy for 2 months (50 minutes/day, 2 times/week, during 16 sessions). Each session lasting 60 minutes, under a protocol in which only the games played were changed, plus 10 minutes of stretching. In the first session, tennis and hula hoop games were used; in the second session, football (soccer) and boxing were used. For the evaluation, the Fulg-Meyer and Short Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36) scales were utilized. The patients were immediately evaluated upon the conclusion of the intervention and 2 months after the second evaluation (follow-up).

Results

Values for the upper limb motor function sub-items and total score in the Fugl–Meyer scale evaluation and functional capacity in the SF-36 questionnaire were sustained, indicating a possible maintenance of the therapeutic effects.

Conclusion

The results suggest that after Nintendo Wii therapy, patients had motor learning retention, achieving a sustained benefit through the technique.

via Virtual Rehabilitation through Nintendo Wii in Poststroke Patients: Follow-Up

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[Abstract+References] A Home-Based Telerehabilitation Program for Patients With Stroke 

Background. Although rehabilitation therapy is commonly provided after stroke, many patients do not derive maximal benefit because of access, cost, and compliance. A telerehabilitation-based program may overcome these barriers. We designed, then evaluated a home-based telerehabilitation system in patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke. Methods. Patients were 3 to 24 months poststroke with stable arm motor deficits. Each received 28 days of telerehabilitation using a system delivered to their home. Each day consisted of 1 structured hour focused on individualized exercises and games, stroke education, and an hour of free play. Results. Enrollees (n = 12) had baseline Fugl-Meyer (FM) scores of 39 ± 12 (mean ± SD). Compliance was excellent: participants engaged in therapy on 329/336 (97.9%) assigned days. Arm repetitions across the 28 days averaged 24,607 ± 9934 per participant. Arm motor status showed significant gains (FM change 4.8 ± 3.8 points, P = .0015), with half of the participants exceeding the minimal clinically important difference. Although scores on tests of computer literacy declined with age (r = −0.92; P < .0001), neither the motor gains nor the amount of system use varied with computer literacy. Daily stroke education via the telerehabilitation system was associated with a 39% increase in stroke prevention knowledge (P = .0007). Depression scores obtained in person correlated with scores obtained via the telerehabilitation system 16 days later (r = 0.88; P = .0001). In-person blood pressure values closely matched those obtained via this system (r = 0.99; P < .0001). Conclusions. This home-based system was effective in providing telerehabilitation, education, and secondary stroke prevention to participants. Use of a computer-based interface offers many opportunities to monitor and improve the health of patients after stroke.

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Source: A Home-Based Telerehabilitation Program for Patients With StrokeNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repair – Lucy Dodakian, Alison L. McKenzie, Vu Le, Jill See, Kristin Pearson-Fuhrhop, Erin Burke Quinlan, Robert J. Zhou, Renee Augsberger, Xuan A. Tran, Nizan Friedman, David J. Reinkensmeyer, Steven C. Cramer, 2017

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[Abstract] Combined Brain and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation in Chronic Stroke Patients With Moderate to Severe Motor Impairment

First published: 

Abstract

Objectives

To evaluate effects of somatosensory stimulation in the form of repetitive peripheral nerve sensory stimulation (RPSS) in combination with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), tDCS alone, RPSS alone, or sham RPSS + tDCS as add-on interventions to training of wrist extension with functional electrical stimulation (FES), in chronic stroke patients with moderate to severe upper limb impairments in a crossover design. We hypothesized that the combination of RPSS and tDCS would enhance the effects of FES on active range of movement (ROM) of the paretic wrist to a greater extent than RPSS alone, tDCS alone or sham RPSS + tDCS.

Materials and Methods

The primary outcome was the active ROM of extension of the paretic wrist. Secondary outcomes were ROM of wrist flexion, grasp, and pinch strength of the paretic and nonparetic upper limbs, and ROM of wrist extension of the nonparetic wrist. Outcomes were blindly evaluated before and after each intervention. Analysis of variance with repeated measures with factors “session” and “time” was performed.

Results

After screening 2499 subjects, 22 were included. Data from 20 subjects were analyzed. There were significant effects of “time” for grasp force of the paretic limb and for ROM of wrist extension of the nonparetic limb, but no effects of “session” or interaction “session x time.” There were no significant effects of “session,” “time,” or interaction “session x time” regarding other outcomes.

Conclusions

Single sessions of PSS + tDCS, tDCS alone, or RPSS alone did not improve training effects in chronic stroke patients with moderate to severe impairment.

Source: Combined Brain and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation in Chronic Stroke Patients With Moderate to Severe Motor Impairment – Menezes – 2017 – Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface – Wiley Online Library

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[Abstract] Proposition of a classification of adult patients with hemiparesis in chronic phase

Objective

Patients who have developed hemiparesis after central nervous system lesion often experience reduced walking capacity. Related gaitabnormalities at hip, knee, and ankle joints during swing induce decreased foot clearance and increased risk of falls, and thus need a meticulous management. This study aimed to (1) propose a classification focusing on these abnormalities for adult patients with hemiparesis, (2) evaluate its discriminatory capacity using clinical gait analysis (CGA).

Material/patients and methods

Twenty-six patients (10 women, 16 men) with hemiparesis (13 left, 13 right) in chronic phase (i.e. hemiparesis more than 6 months old) were included in this study. Clinical examination (i.e. passive range of motion, muscle weakness, and spasticity) and video records were conducted on each patient. The following classification was then applied: group I (GI) was mainly characterized by a decreased ankle dorsiflexion during swing, group II (GII) and group III (GIII) by a decreased knee flexion during swing, completed by a reduced range of hip motion and a hip flexors weakness in GIII. Subdivisions were also applied on each group to describe (a) absence or (b) presence of genu recurvatum during stance. The discriminatory capacity of the classification was then evaluated. For that, all patients were instrumented with cutaneous reflective markers and at least 5 gait cycles were recorded using optoelectronic cameras (OQUS, Qualisys, Sweden). A statistical analysis (ANOVA) was then performed between each group and subgroup on 24 kinematic parameters and walking speed.

Results

Only one patient could not be classified, 5 were classified in GI (1 GIa, 4 GIb), 15 in GII (7 GIIa, 8 GIIb), and 5 in GIII (1 GIIIa, 4 GIIIb). When subgroups (a) and (b) were combined, 16 of the 25 assessed parameters revealed a statistically significant difference (P-level < 0.05) between at least two groups. In particular, the maximum knee flexion in swing and the total amplitude of hip flexion-extension were significantly different between groups.

Discussion – conclusion

This classification can be performed in regular clinical practice (using clinical evaluation and video records). It should thus ease the development of clinical management algorithms and the efficiency assessment of related therapies.

Source: Proposition of a classification of adult patients with hemiparesis in chronic phase – ScienceDirect

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