Posts Tagged Data Glove

[ARTICLE] Reorganization of finger coordination patterns through motor exploration in individuals after stroke – Full Text

 

Abstract

Background

Impairment of hand and finger function after stroke is common and affects the ability to perform activities of daily living. Even though many of these coordination deficits such as finger individuation have been well characterized, it is critical to understand how stroke survivors learn to explore and reorganize their finger coordination patterns for optimizing rehabilitation. In this study, I examine the use of a body-machine interface to assess how participants explore their movement repertoire, and how this changes with continued practice.

Methods

Ten participants with chronic stroke wore a data glove and the finger joint angles were mapped on to the position of a cursor on a screen. The task of the participants was to move the cursor back and forth between two specified targets on a screen. Critically, the map between the finger movements and cursor motion was altered so that participants sometimes had to generate coordination patterns that required finger individuation. There were two phases to the experiment – an initial assessment phase on day 1, followed by a learning phase (days 2–5) where participants trained to reorganize their coordination patterns.

Results

Participants showed difficulty in performing tasks which had maps that required finger individuation, and the degree to which they explored their movement repertoire was directly related to clinical tests of hand function. However, over four sessions of practice, participants were able to learn to reorganize their finger movement coordination pattern and improve their performance. Moreover, training also resulted in improvements in movement repertoire outside of the context of the specific task during free exploration.

Conclusions

Stroke survivors show deficits in movement repertoire in their paretic hand, but facilitating movement exploration during training can increase the movement repertoire. This suggests that exploration may be an important element of rehabilitation to regain optimal function.

Background

Stroke often results in impairments of upper extremity, including hand and finger function, with 75% of stroke survivors facing difficulties performing activities of daily living [12]. Critically, impairments after stroke not only include muscle- and joint-specific deficits such as weakness, and changes in the kinetic and kinematic workspace of the fingers [34], but also coordination deficits such as reduced independent joint control [5] and impairments in finger individuation and enslaving [6789]. Therefore, understanding how to address these coordination deficits is critical for improving hand rehabilitation.

Typical approaches to hand rehabilitation emphasize repetition [10] and functional practice based on evidence that such experience can cause reorganization in the brain [11]. Although this has proven to be reasonably successful, functional practice (such as repetitive grasping of objects) does not specify the coordination pattern to be used when performing the tasks. As a result, because of the redundancy in the human body, there is a risk that stroke survivors may adopt atypical compensatory movements to perform tasks [12]. These compensatory movements have been mainly identified during reaching [1314], but there is evidence that they are also present in finger coordination patterns during grasping [15]. Although there is still debate over the role of compensatory movements in rehabilitation [16], there is at least some evidence both in animal and humans that continued use of these compensatory patterns may be detrimental to true recovery [171819].

To address this issue, there has been a greater focus on directly facilitating the learning of new coordination patterns. Specifically, in hand rehabilitation, virtual tasks (such as playing a virtual piano) have been examined as a way to train finger individuation [2021]. In these protocols, individuation is encouraged by asking participants to press a particular key with a finger, while keeping other fingers stationary. A similar approach to improve hand dexterity was also adopted by developing a glove that could be used as a controller for a popular guitar-playing video game [22]. However, directly instructing desired coordination patterns to be produced becomes challenging as the number of degrees of freedom involved in the coordination pattern increase. For example, the hand has approximately 20 kinematic degrees of freedom, and providing verbal, visual or auditory feedback for simultaneously controlling all these degrees of freedom would be a major challenge. A potential solution that has been suggested is not to directly instruct the coordination pattern itself, but rather let participants explore different coordination patterns [23]. This idea of motor exploration is based on dynamical systems theory that suggests that variability and exploration may help participants escape sub-optimal pre-existing coordination patterns and potentially settle in more optimal coordination patterns [24252627]. Such exploration has been shown to be important in adapting existing movement repertoire [28], and has also been shown to be associated with faster rates of learning [29].

In order to test the hypothesis that exploration of novel coordination patterns can improve overall movement repertoire, I used a body-machine interface [3031] to examine how stroke survivors explore and reorganize finger coordination patterns with practice. A body-machine interface maps body movements (in this case finger movements) to the control of a real or virtual object (in this case a screen cursor), which can provide a way to elicit different coordination patterns in the context of an intuitive task. Specifically I examined: (i) how stroke survivors reorganize their finger coordination patterns, (ii) how training to explore novel coordination patterns affects their ability to reorganize their coordination pattern, and (iii) if training to explore novel coordination patterns has an effect on their overall movement repertoire. In this context, I use the term “novel” to indicate coordination patterns that require finger individuation. This assumption is motivated by the finding that stroke survivors have difficulty producing finger individuation even under explicit instruction [69], and therefore it is highly likely that they would not use coordination patterns requiring finger individuation frequently in activities of daily living.[…]

Continue —>  Reorganization of finger coordination patterns through motor exploration in individuals after stroke | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Fig. 1 a Experimental setup – participants wore a data glove and moved their fingers to control a screen cursor b Schematic of task – participants moved a cursor between two targets using movements of four fingers (thumb excluded). c Experimental protocol. Participants came in for 5 total sessions – an initial assessment phase, followed by a learning phase. d Weighting coefficients of the index and middle (blue), and ring and little (red) fingers during the initial assessment phase, and e weighting coefficients during the learning phase

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[ARTICLE] Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Fig. 1 The portable YouGrabber system. a A patient playing the Airplane game on the portable YouGrabber system. b The complete data glove with sensor-“box”, bending sensors, and vibrating units attached to the size fit neoprene glove. c The complete equipment packed for “take away”

Abstract

Background

Home-based, computer-enhanced therapy of hand and arm function can complement conventional interventions and increase the amount and intensity of training, without interfering too much with family routines. The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and usability of the new portable version of the YouGrabber® system (YouRehab AG, Zurich, Switzerland) in the home setting.

Methods

Fifteen families of children (7 girls, mean age: 11.3y) with neuromotor disorders and affected upper limbs participated. They received instructions and took the system home to train for 2 weeks. After returning it, they answered questions about usability, motivation, and their general opinion of the system (Visual Analogue Scale; 0 indicating worst score, 100 indicating best score; ≤30 not satisfied, 31–69 average, ≥70 satisfied). Furthermore, total pure playtime and number of training sessions were quantified. To prove the usability of the system, number and sort of support requests were logged.

Results

The usability of the system was considered average to satisfying (mean 60.1–93.1). The lowest score was given for the occurrence of technical errors. Parents had to motivate their children to start (mean 66.5) and continue (mean 68.5) with the training. But in general, parents estimated the therapeutic benefit as high (mean 73.1) and the whole system as very good (mean 87.4). Children played on average 7 times during the 2 weeks; total pure playtime was 185 ± 45 min. Especially at the beginning of the trial, systems were very error-prone. Fortunately, we, or the company, solved most problems before the patients took the systems home. Nevertheless, 10 of 15 families contacted us at least once because of technical problems.

Conclusions

Despite that the YouGrabber® is a promising and highly accepted training tool for home-use, currently, it is still error-prone, and the requested support exceeds the support that can be provided by clinical therapists. A technically more robust system, combined with additional attractive games, likely results in higher patient motivation and better compliance. This would reduce the need for parents to motivate their children extrinsically and allow for clinical trials to investigate the effectiveness of the system.

Keywords

Data glove, Pediatrics ,Neurorehabilitation, Upper extremities ,YouGrabber, Tele-rehabilitation, Game-based, Cerebral palsy, Children and adolescents, Clinical utility, User satisfaction

Continue —>  Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

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[ARTICLE] Helping-Hand: A data glove technology for rehabilitation of monoplegia patients

Abstract

Monoplegia is a paralysis of a single limb; usually an arm and patients having monoplegia usually cannot regain their full-potential. Physical therapy is most beneficial for the treatment of monoplegia. However, this physical therapy includes monotonous exercises which seems dull to the patient. Computer assisted technology may be used to assist the patient for doing the physical exercises more effectively and enjoyably.

In this paper, we present a computer controlled electronic device called ‘Helping Hand’ that can be used for the rehabilitation process of monoplegia patients by assisting him/her in physical therapy sessions. The system collects data of upper limb movements of patients for analysis and generates a report based on analysis.

Finally, this report will be sent to the doctor for observing the improvement of rehabilitation phase of the patient. This system can reduce the workload of physical therapists and improve the effect of rehabilitation exercise for upper limb monoplegia patients.

via IEEE Xplore Abstract (Abstract) – Helping-Hand: A data glove technology for rehabilitation of monoplegia patients.

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