Posts Tagged efficacy

[WEB SITE] Traumatic brain injuries could be healed using peptide hydrogels

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) –– defined as a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain function –– sent 2.5 million people in the U.S. to the emergency room in 2014, according to statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Today, researchers report a self-assembling peptide hydrogel that, when injected into the brains of rats with TBI, increased blood vessel regrowth and neuronal survival.

The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. ACS, the world’s largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday. It features more than 9,500 presentations on a wide range of science topics.

“When we think about traumatic brain injuries, we think of soldiers and athletes,” says Biplab Sarkar, Ph.D., who is presenting the work at the meeting. “But most TBIs actually happen when people fall or are involved in motor vehicle accidents. As the average age of the country continues to rise, the number of fall-related accidents in particular will also increase.”

TBIs encompass two types of injuries. Primary injury results from the initial mechanical damage to neurons and other cells in the brain, as well as blood vessels. Secondary injuries, which can occur seconds after the TBI and last for years, include oxidative stress, inflammation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier. “The secondary injury creates this neurotoxic environment that can lead to long-term cognitive effects,” Sarkar says. For example, TBI survivors can experience impaired motor control and an increased rate of depression, he says. Currently, there is no effective regenerative treatment for TBIs.

Sarkar and Vivek Kumar, Ph.D., the project’s principal investigator, wanted to develop a therapy that could help treat secondary injuries.

We wanted to be able to regrow new blood vessels in the area to restore oxygen exchange, which is reduced in patients with a TBI. Also, we wanted to create an environment where neurons can be supported and even thrive.”

Biplab Sarkar, Ph.D., New Jersey Institute of Technology

The researchers, both at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, had previously developed peptides that can self-assemble into hydrogels when injected into rodents. By incorporating snippets of particular protein sequences into the peptides, the team can give them different functions. For example, Sarkar and Kumar previously developed angiogenic peptide hydrogels that grow new blood vessels when injected under the skin of mice.

To adapt their technology to the brain, Sarkar and Kumar modified the peptide sequences to make the material properties of the hydrogel more closely resemble those of brain tissue, which is softer than most other tissues of the body. They also attached a sequence from a neuroprotective protein called ependymin. The researchers tested the new peptide hydrogel in a rat model of TBI. When injected at the injury site, the peptides self-assembled into a hydrogel that acted as a neuroprotective niche to which neurons could attach.

A week after injecting the hydrogel, the team examined the rats’ brains. They found that in the presence of the hydrogel, survival of the brain cells dramatically improved, resulting in about twice as many neurons at the injury site in treated rats than in control animals with brain injury. In addition, the researchers saw signs of new blood vessel formation. “We saw some indications that the rats in the treated group were more ambulatory than those in the control group, but we need to do more experiments to actually quantify that,” Sarkar says.

According to Kumar, one of the next steps will be to study the behavior of the treated animals to assess their functional recovery from TBI. The researchers are also interested in treating rats with a combination of their previous angiogenic peptide and their new neurogenic version to see if this could enhance recovery. And finally, they plan to find out if the peptide hydrogels work for more diffuse brain injuries, such as concussions. “We’ve seen that we can inject these materials into a defined injury and get good tissue regeneration, but we’re also collaborating with different groups to find out if it could help with the types of injuries we see in soldiers, veterans and even people working at construction sites who experience blast injuries,” Kumar says.

via Traumatic brain injuries could be healed using peptide hydrogels

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[Abstract] Efficacy and Safety of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Post-Stroke Depression:A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Abstract

Objective

To summarize and systematically review the efficacy and safety of high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) for depression in stroke patients.

Data Sources

Six databases (Wanfang, CNKI, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science) were searched from inception until November 15, 2018.

Study Selection

Seventeen randomized controlled trials were included for meta-analysis.

Data Extraction

Two independent reviewers selected potentially relevant studies based on the inclusion criteria, extracted data, and evaluated the methodological quality of the eligible trials using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro).

Data Synthesis

We calculated the combined effect size (standardized mean difference [SMD] and odds ratio [OR]) for the corresponding effects models. Physiotherapy Evidence Database scores ranged from 7 to 8 points (mean = 7.35). The study results indicated that HF-rTMS had significantly positive effects on depression in stroke patients. The effect sizes of the SMD ranged from small to large (SMD = −1.01; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], −1.36 to −0.66; P < .001; I2 = 85%; n = 1053), and the effect sizes of the OR were large (response rates: 58.43% VS 33.59%; OR = 3.31; 95% CI, 2.25 to 4.88; P < .001; I2 = 0%; n = 529; remission rates: 26.59% VS 12.60%; OR = 2.72; 95% CI, 1.69 to 4.38; P < .001; I2 = 0%; n = 529). In terms of treatment side-effects, the HF-rTMS group was more prone to headache than the control group (OR = 3.53; 95% CI, 1.85 to 8.55; P < .001; I2 = 0%; n = 496).

Conclusions

HF-rTMS is an effective intervention for post-stroke depression, although treatment safety should be further verified via large sample multi-center trials.

via Efficacy and Safety of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Post-Stroke Depression:A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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[Abstract] Efficacy and safety of NABOTA in post-stroke upper limb spasticity: A phase 3 multicenter, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial

Highlights

A phase III clinical trial was performed for a novel botulinum toxin A, NABOTA, on post-stroke upper limb spasticity.

NABOTA demonstrated non-inferiority on efficacy and safety compared to onabotulinum toxin A (Botox).

NABOTA may serve as an alternative for treatment of post-stroke upper limb spasticity using botulinum toxin A.

Abstract

Botulinum toxin A is widely used in the clinics to reduce spasticity and improve upper limb function for post-stroke patients. Efficacy and safety of a new botulinum toxin type A, NABOTA (DWP450) in post-stroke upper limb spasticity was evaluated in comparison with Botox (onabotulinum toxin A). A total of 197 patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity were included in this study and randomly assigned to NABOTA group (n = 99) or Botox group (n = 98). Wrist flexors with modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) grade 2 or greater, and elbow flexors, thumb flexors and finger flexors with MAS 1 or greater were injected with either drug. The primary outcome was the change of wrist flexor MAS between baseline and 4 weeks post-injection. MAS of each injected muscle, Disability Assessment Scale (DAS), and Caregiver Burden Scale were also assessed at baseline and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the injection. Global Assessment Scale (GAS) was evaluated on the last visit at 12 weeks. The change of MAS for wrist flexor between baseline and 4 weeks post-injection was − 1.44 ± 0.72 in the NABOTA group and − 1.46 ± 0.77 in the Botox group. The difference of change between both groups was 0.0129 (95% confidence interval − 0.2062–0.2319), within the non-inferiority margin of 0.45. Both groups showed significant improvements regarding MAS of all injected muscles, DAS, and Caregiver Burden Scale at all follow-up periods. There were no significant differences in all secondary outcome measures between the two groups. NABOTA demonstrated non-inferior efficacy and safety for improving upper limb spasticity in stroke patients compared to Botox.

 

via Efficacy and safety of NABOTA in post-stroke upper limb spasticity: A phase 3 multicenter, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial – ScienceDirect

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[ARTICLE] Transcranial magnetic stimulation: A potential new treatment for depression associated with traumatic brain injury

Abstract

Background: Each year, more than 1.7 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder following TBI is between 25–50%. There are no validated established strategies to treat TBI depression. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel putative treatment option for post-TBI depression, which, compared with standard pharmacological agents, may provide a more targeted treatment with fewer side-effects. However, TBI is associated with an increased risk of both early and late spontaneous seizures, a significant consideration in evaluating rTMS as a potential treatment for TBI depression. Whilst the risk of seizure from rTMS is low, underlying neuropathology may somewhat increase that risk.

Review: This review focuses on the safety aspects of rTMS in TBI patients. The authors review why low frequency rTMS might be less likely to trigger a seizure than high frequency rTMS and propose low frequency rTMS as a safer option in TBI patients. Because there is little data on the safety of rTMS in TBI, the authors also review the safety of rTMS in patients with other brain pathology.

Conclusion: It is concluded that pilot safety and tolerability studies should be first conducted in persons with TBI and neuropsychiatric comorbidities. These results could be used to help design larger randomized controlled trials.

via Transcranial magnetic stimulation: A potential new treatment for depression associated with traumatic brain injury, Brain Injury, Informa Healthcare.

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