Posts Tagged energy expenditure

[Abstract] Exergaming for individuals with neurological disability: a systematic review

Introduction: Exergames have the potential to enable persons with disabilities to take part in physical activities that are of appropriate “dose-potency” and enjoyable within a relatively safe home environment. It overcomes some of the challenges regarding transportation difficulties in getting to commercial gymnasium facilities, reducing physical activities perceived as “boring” or getting access into the built environment that may be “wheelchair unfriendly”. Objective: This systematic review assessed available evidence whether “exergaming” could be a feasible modality for contributing to a recommended exercise prescription according to current ACSM™ or WHO guidelines for physical activity. Methods: Strategies used to search for published articles were conducted using separate search engines (Google Scholar™, PubMed™ and Web of Science™) on cardiometabolic responses and perceived exertion during exergaming among neurologically-disabled populations possessing similar physical disabilities. Each study was categorized using the SCIRE-Pedro evidence scale. Results: Ten of the 144 articles assessed were identified and met specific inclusion criteria. Key outcome measures included responses, such as energy expenditure, heart rate and perceived exertion. Twelve out of the 17 types of exergaming interventions met the ACSM™ or WHO recommendations of “moderate intensity” physical activity. Exergames such as Wii Jogging, Bicycling, Boxing, DDR and GameCycle reported moderate physical activity intensities. While Wii Snowboarding, Skiing and Bowling only produced light intensities. Conclusion: Preliminary cross-sectional evidence in this review suggested that exergames have the potential to provide moderate intensity physical activity as recommended by ACSM™ or WHO in populations with neurological disabilities. However, more research is needed to document exergaming’s efficacy from longitudinal observations before definitive conclusions can be drawn.

  • Implications for Rehabilitation
  • Exergaming can be deployed as physical activity or exercise using commercially available game consoles for neurologically disabled individuals in the convenience of their home environment and at a relatively inexpensive cost

  • Moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercises can be achieved during exergaming in this population of persons with neurological disabilities. Exergaming can also be engaging and enjoyable, yet achieve the recommended physical activity guidelines proposed by ACSM™ or WHO for health and fitness benefits.

  • Exergaming as physical activity in this population is feasible for individuals with profound disabilities, since it can be used even in sitting position for wheelchair-dependent users, thus providing variability in terms of exercise options.

  • In the context of comprehensive rehabilitation, exergaming should be viewed by the clinician as “at least as good as” (and likely more enjoyable) than traditional arm-exercise modalities, with equivalent aerobic dose-potency as “traditional” exercise in clinic or home environments.

Source: Exergaming for individuals with neurological disability: a systematic review: Disability and Rehabilitation: Vol 39, No 8

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[Abstract] Exergaming for individuals with neurological disability: a systematic review – Disability and Rehabilitation –

Abstract

Introduction: Exergames have the potential to enable persons with disabilities to take part in physical activities that are of appropriate “dose-potency” and enjoyable within a relatively safe home environment. It overcomes some of the challenges regarding transportation difficulties in getting to commercial gymnasium facilities, reducing physical activities perceived as “boring” or getting access into the built environment that may be “wheelchair unfriendly”. Objective: This systematic review assessed available evidence whether “exergaming” could be a feasible modality for contributing to a recommended exercise prescription according to current ACSM™ or WHO guidelines for physical activity.Methods: Strategies used to search for published articles were conducted using separate search engines (Google Scholar™, PubMed™ and Web of Science™) on cardiometabolic responses and perceived exertion during exergaming among neurologically-disabled populations possessing similar physical disabilities. Each study was categorized using the SCIRE-Pedro evidence scale. Results: Ten of the 144 articles assessed were identified and met specific inclusion criteria. Key outcome measures included responses, such as energy expenditure, heart rate and perceived exertion. Twelve out of the 17 types of exergaming interventions met the ACSM™ or WHO recommendations of “moderate intensity” physical activity. Exergames such as Wii Jogging, Bicycling, Boxing, DDR and GameCycle reported moderate physical activity intensities. While Wii Snowboarding, Skiing and Bowling only produced light intensities. Conclusion: Preliminary cross-sectional evidence in this review suggested that exergames have the potential to provide moderate intensity physical activity as recommended by ACSM™ or WHO in populations with neurological disabilities. However, more research is needed to document exergaming’s efficacy from longitudinal observations before definitive conclusions can be drawn.

  • Implications for Rehabilitation

  • Exergaming can be deployed as physical activity or exercise using commercially available game consoles for neurologically disabled individuals in the convenience of their home environment and at a relatively inexpensive cost

  • Moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercises can be achieved during exergaming in this population of persons with neurological disabilities. Exergaming can also be engaging and enjoyable, yet achieve the recommended physical activity guidelines proposed by ACSM™ or WHO for health and fitness benefits.

  • Exergaming as physical activity in this population is feasible for individuals with profound disabilities, since it can be used even in sitting position for wheelchair-dependent users, thus providing variability in terms of exercise options.

  • In the context of comprehensive rehabilitation, exergaming should be viewed by the clinician as “at least as good as” (and likely more enjoyable) than traditional arm-exercise modalities, with equivalent aerobic dose-potency as “traditional” exercise in clinic or home environments.

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Source: Exergaming for individuals with neurological disability: a systematic review – Disability and Rehabilitation –

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[ARTICLE] Energy Expenditure and Exercise Intensity of Interactive Video Gaming in Individuals Poststroke

Abstract

Background. Off-the-shelf activity-promoting video games (AVGs) are proposed as a tool for promoting regular physical activity among individuals poststroke.

Objective. To characterize the energy expenditure (EE), exercise intensity, and energy metabolism of individuals poststroke, while playing AVGs in different positions, from different consoles, and to compare the performance with comfortable walking and with able-bodied individuals.

Methods. Eleven poststroke and 8 able-bodied participants played in standing Wii-Boxing Xbox-Boxing, Wii-Run and Penguin, and also Wii-Boxing in sitting. EE (expressed as metabolic equivalents [METs]); exercise intensity (expressed as %predicted maximal heart rate [HR]), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were used to characterize the games. Results. Participants’ poststroke EE ranged from 1.81 ± 0.74 to 3.46 ± 1.3 METs and was lower compared with able-bodied participants for Xbox-Boxing (P = .001), Wii-Boxing in standing (P = .01), Run (P < .001), and Penguin (P = .001). Participants’ poststroke exercise intensity ranged from 49.8 ± 9.3 to 64.7 ± 9.3 %predicted maximal HR and was lower compared with able-bodied participants for Xbox-Boxing (P = .007) and Run (P = .005). For participants poststroke, EE of walking at a comfortable did not differ from boxing games in standing or Run. For able-bodied participants only, the EE for Xbox-Boxing was higher than Wii-Boxing (6.5 ± 2.6 vs 4.4 ± 1.1, P = .02). EE was higher in standing versus sitting for poststroke (P = .04) and able-bodied (P = .03) participants. There were no significant group differences for RPEs. RER of playing in sitting approached anaerobic metabolism.

Conclusions. Playing upper extremity (ie, Boxing) or mobility (ie, Run) AVGs in standing resulted in moderate EE and intensity for participants poststroke. EE was lower for poststroke than for able-bodied participants.

via Energy Expenditure and Exercise Intensity of Interactive Video Gaming in Individuals Poststroke.

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