Posts Tagged Exercise

[Abstract] Soymilk ingestion immediately after therapeutic exercise enhances rehabilitation outcomes in chronic stroke patients: A randomized controlled trial. – NeuroRehabilitation

Abstract

Study investigated the effects of an 8-week rehabilitation exercise program combined with soymilk ingestion immediately after exercise on functional outcomes in chronic stroke patients.

Twenty-two stroke patients were randomly allocated to either the soymilk or the placebo (PLA) group and received identical 8-weeks rehabilitation intervention (3 sessions per week for 120 minutes each session) with corresponding treatment beverages. The physical and functional outcomes were evaluated before, during, and after the intervention. The 8-week rehabilitation program enhanced functional outcomes of participants.

The immediate soymilk ingestion after exercise additionally improved hand grip strength, walking speed over 8 feet, walking performance per unit lean mass, and 6-Minute Walk Test performance compared with PLA after the intervention. However, the improvements in the total score for Short Physical Performance Battery and lean mass did not differ between groups.

This study demonstrated that, compared with rehabilitation alone, the 8-week rehabilitation program combined with immediate soymilk ingestion further improved walking speed, exercise endurance, grip strength, and muscle functionality in chronic stroke patients.
 

via Articles, Books, Reports, & Multimedia: Search REHABDATA | National Rehabilitation Information Center

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] A novel neurocognitive rehabilitation tool in the recovery of hemiplegic hand grip after stroke: a case report.

Abstract

Stroke has significant physical, psychological and social consequences. Recent rehabilitation approaches suggest that cognitive exercises with dual-task (sensory-motor) exercises positively influence the recovery and function of the hemiplegic hand grip. The purpose of this study was to describe a rehabilitation protocol involving the use of a new neurocognitive tool called “UOVO” for hand grip recovery after stroke. A 58-year-old right-handed male patient in the chronic stage of stroke, presenting with left-sided hemiparesis and marked motor deficits at the level of the left hand and forearm, was treated with the UOVO, a new rehabilitation instrument based on the neurocognitive rehabilitation theory of Perfetti. The patient was evaluated at T0 (before treatment), T1 (after treatment) and T2 (2 months of follow-up). At T2, the patient showed improvements of motor functions, shoulder, elbow and wrist spasticity, motility and performance. This case report explores the possibility of improving traditional rehabilitation through a neurocognitive approach with a dual-task paradigm (including motor and somato-sensory stimulation), specifically one involving the use of an original rehabilitation aid named UOVO, which lends itself very well to exercises proposed through the use of motor imagery. The results were encouraging and showed improvements in hemiplegic hand grip function and recovery. However, further studies, in the form of randomized controlled trials, will be needed to further explore and confirm our results.

 

via A novel neurocognitive rehabilitation tool in the recovery of hemiplegic hand grip after stroke: a case report. – PubMed – NCBI

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[NEWS] New Virtual Reality Therapy game could offer relief for patients with chronic pain, mobility issues

News-MedicalA Virtual Reality Therapy game (iVRT) which could introduce relief for patients suffering from chronic pain and mobility issues has been developed by a team of UK researchers.

Dr Andrew Wilson and colleagues from Birmingham City University built the CRPS app in collaboration with clinical staff at Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust for a new way to tackle complex regional pain syndrome and to aid people living with musculoskeletal conditions.

Using a head mounted display and controllers, the team created an immersive and interactive game which mimics the processes used in traditional ‘mirror therapy’ treatment. Within the game, players are consciously and subconsciously encouraged to stretch, move and position the limbs that are affected by their conditions.

Mirror therapy is a medical exercise intervention where a mirror is used to create areflective illusion that encourages patient’s brain to move their limb more freely. This intervention is often used by occupational therapists and physiotherapists to treat CRPS patients who have experienced a stroke. This treatment has proven to be successful exercises are often deemed routine and mundane by patients, which contributes to decline in the completion of therapy.

Work around the CRPS project, which could have major implications for other patient rehabilitation programmes worldwide when fully realised, was presented at the 12th European Conference on Game Based Learning (ECGBL) in France late last year.

Dr Wilson, who leads Birmingham City University’s contribution to a European research study into how virtual reality games can encourage more physical activity, and how movement science in virtual worlds can be used for both rehabilitation and treatment adherence, explained, “The first part of the CRPS project was to examine the feasibility of being able to create a game which reflects the rehabilitation exercises that the clinical teams use on the ground to reduce pain and improve mobility in specific patients.”

“By making the game enjoyable and playable we hope family members will play too and in doing so encourage the patient to continue with their rehabilitation. Our early research has shown that in healthy volunteers both regular and casual gamers enjoyed the game which is promising in terms of our theory surrounding how we may support treatment adherence by exploiting involvement of family and friends in the therapy processes.”

The CRPS project was realized through collaborative working between City Hospital, Birmingham, and staff at the School of Computing and Digital Technology, and was developed following research around the provision of a 3D virtual reality ophthalmoscopy trainer.

Andrea Quadling, Senior Occupational Therapist at Sandwell Hospital, said “The concept of using virtual reality to treat complex pain conditions is exciting, appealing and shows a lot of potential. This software has the potential to be very helpful in offering additional treatment options for people who suffer with CRPS.”

via New Virtual Reality Therapy game could offer relief for patients with chronic pain, mobility issues

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] How to stretch your hands and wrists – Videos

Wrist pain can be frustrating and inconvenient. It can also make work or basic day-to-day activities, such as using a computer or cooking a meal, more difficult.

Exercises can improve mobility and decrease the chance of injury or reinjury. Wrist stretches are easy to do at home or at the office. When done properly, they can benefit a person’s overall wrist and hand health.

Anyone experiencing chronic pain or pain with numbness should visit a doctor for a thorough diagnosis.

The following stretches can help improve strength and mobility:

Wrist and hand stretches

A person should do the exercises below slowly and gently, focusing on stretching and strengthening. If the stretch hurts, stop.

The following wrist and hand stretches may improve strength and mobility:

1. Raised fist stretch

Raised fist stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Start with your arm up beside your head, with your hand open.
  2. Make a fist, keeping your thumb outside of it.
  3. Slide your fingers toward your wrist until you feel a stretch.

2. Wrist rotations

Wrist rotations

To do this stretch:

  1. Stretch your arm out in front of you.
  2. Slowly, point the fingers down until you feel a stretch. Use the other hand to gently pull the raised hand toward the body. Hold this position for 3–5 seconds.
  3. Point the fingers toward the ceiling until you feel a stretch. Use the other hand to gently pull the raised hand toward the body. Hold this position for 3–5 seconds.
  4. Repeat this three times.

3. Prayer position

Prayer position

To do this stretch:

  1. Sit with your palms together and your elbows on the table in a prayer position.
  2. Lower the sides of the hands toward the table until you feel a stretch. Keep your palms together. Hold this position for 5–7 seconds.
  3. Relax.
  4. Repeat this three times.

4. Hooked stretch

Hooked stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Hook one elbow under the other and pull both arms towards the center of the torso. You should feel a stretch in your shoulders.
  2. Wrap one arm around the other so that the palms are touching.
  3. Hold the position for 25 seconds.
  4. Switch arms and repeat it on the other side.

5. Finger stretch

finger stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Bring the pinky and ring fingers together.
  2. Separate the middle and index fingers from the ring finger.
  3. Repeat the stretch 10 times.

6. Fist-opener

Fist opener

To do this stretch:

  1. Make a fist and hold it in front of you.
  2. Stretch your fingers until your hand is flat and open, with the fingers together.
  3. Repeat the movements 10 times.

7. Sponge-squeeze

Sponge squeeze

To do this stretch:

  1. Squeeze a sponge or stress ball, making a fist.
  2. Hold the position for 10 seconds.
  3. Relax.
  4. Repeat this 10 times.

8. Windshield wiper wrist movement

To do this stretch:

  1. Start with your hand face down on a table.
  2. Gently, point the hand to one side as far as it can go without moving the wrist. Hold it there for 3–5 seconds.
  3. Do the same on the other side.
  4. Repeat the movement three times on each side.

9. Thumb pull

To do this stretch:

  1. Grab your thumb with the other hand.
  2. Gently pull the thumb backward, away from the hand.
  3. Hold the stretch for 25 seconds.
  4. Repeat it on the other thumb.

10. Flower stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Stretch the arms in front of you, with the backs of the hands and wrists touching.
  2. Imagine an invisible force pulling the fingers further from the body. Feel the stretch.
  3. Hold it for 25 seconds.

11. Finger fan

To do this stretch:

  1. Make a fist.
  2. Stretch your fingers outwards as far as they can go, like a fan.
  3. Repeat the movements 10 times.

12. Imaginary piano

To do this stretch:

  1. Pretend to play a piano.
  2. Flip your hands over and play an upside-down piano.

13. Finger pulls

To do this stretch:

  1. Lay your hand flat on a table.
  2. Gently pull a finger upward so that it points toward the ceiling.
  3. Hold the position for 5 seconds.
  4. Release the finger.
  5. Repeat this on all the other fingers.

14. Alternate finger stretch

To do this stretch:

  1. Bring the middle and ring fingers together.
  2. Separate the pinky and index fingers from them.
  3. Repeat the stretch 10 times.

15. Wrist-strengthener

To do this stretch:

  1. Get into position on your hands and knees, with the fingers pointing toward the body.
  2. Slowly lean forward, keeping your elbows straight.
  3. Hold the position for 20 seconds.
  4. Relax, then repeat the stretch.

Takeaway

Working with computers, writing, and doing manual labor put strain on the hands and wrists and can cause problems over time, such as tendonitis and carpal tunnel syndrome.

Taking frequent breaks and stretching before and while using the hands and wrists can help prevent strain. Improving flexibility and strength gradually can help people avoid wrist and hand injuries.

via Medical News Today: How to stretch your hands and wrists

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Improving walking ability in people with neurological conditions: A theoretical framework for biomechanics driven exercise prescription

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how knowledge of the biomechanics of walking can be used to inform the prescription of resistance exercises for people with mobility limitations. Muscle weakness is a key physical impairment that limits walking in commonly occurring neurological conditions such as cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and stroke. Few randomised trials to date have shown conclusively that strength training improves walking in people living with these conditions. This appears to be because

1) the most important muscle groups for forward propulsion when walking have not been targeted for strengthening, and

2) strength training protocols have focused on slow and heavy resistance exercises, which do not improve the fast muscle contractions required for walking.

We propose a theoretical framework to improve exercise prescription by integrating the biomechanics of walking with the principles of strength training outlined by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), to prescribe exercises that are specific to improving the task of walking. The high angular velocities that occur in the lower limb joints during walking indicate that resistance exercises targeting power generation would be most appropriate. Therefore, we propose the prescription of plyometric and ballistic resistance exercise, applied using the ACSM guidelines for task-specificity, once people with neurological conditions are ambulating, to improve walking outcomes. This new theoretical framework for resistance training ensures that exercise prescription matches how the muscles work during walking.

via Improving walking ability in people with neurological conditions: A theoretical framework for biomechanics driven exercise prescription – Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Adherence to a Long-Term Physical Activity and Exercise Program After Stroke Applied in a Randomized Controlled Trial

Abstract

Background: Persistent physical activity is important to maintain motor function across all stages after stroke.
Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate adherence to an 18-month physical activity and exercise program.
Design: The design was a prospective, longitudinal study including participants who had had a stroke randomly allocated to the intervention arm of a randomized controlled trial.
Methods: The intervention consisted of individualized monthly coaching by a physical therapist who motivated participants to adhere to 30 minutes of daily physical activity and 45 minutes of weekly exercise over an 18-month period. The primary outcome was the combination of participants’ self-reported training diaries and adherence, as reported by the physical therapists. Mixed-effect models were used to analyze change in adherence over time. Intensity levels, measured by the Borg scale, were a secondary outcome.
Results: In total, 186 informed, consenting participants who had had mild-to-moderate stroke were included 3 months after stroke onset. Mean age was 71.7 years (SD = 11.9). Thirty-four (18.3%) participants withdrew and 9 (4.8%) died during follow-up. Adherence to physical activity and exercise each month ranged from 51.2% to 73.1%, and from 63.5% to 79.7%, respectively. Adherence to physical activity increased by 2.6% per month (odds ratio = 1.026, 95% CI = 1.014–1.037). Most of the exercise was performed at moderate-to-high intensity levels, ranging from scores of 12 to 16 on the Borg scale, with an increase of 0.018 points each month (95% CI = 0.011–0.024).
Limitations: Limitations included missing information about adherence for participants with missing data and reasons for dropout.
Conclusions: Participants with mild and moderate impairments after stroke who received individualized regular coaching established and maintained moderate-to-good adherence to daily physical activity and weekly exercise over time.

 

via Adherence to a Long-Term Physical Activity and Exercise Program After Stroke Applied in a Randomized Controlled Trial | Physical Therapy | Oxford Academic

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

[BLOG POST] Antidepressants help us understand why we get fatigued during exercise

In general, the term ‘fatigue’ is used to describe any exercise-induced decline in the ability of a muscle to generate force. To identify the causes of fatigue, it is common to examine two divisions of the body that might be affected during exercise. The central component of fatigue includes the many nerves that travel throughout the brain to the spinal cord. The peripheral component predominantly reflects elements in the muscle itself. If there is a problem with either of these components, the ability to contract a muscle might be compromised. For many years, there has been suggestion that central fatigue is heavily influenced by neurotransmitters that get released in the central nervous system (such as dopamine and serotonin). However, little research has been performed in this area.

Serotonin is a chemical that can improve mood, and increasing the amount of serotonin that circulates in the brain is a common therapy for depression. However, serotonin also plays a vital role in activating neurons in the spinal cord which tell the muscle to contract. With the correct amount of serotonin release, a muscle will activate efficiently. However, if too much serotonin is released, there is a possibility that the muscle will rapidly fatigue. Recent animal studies indicate that moderate amounts of serotonin release, which are common during exercise, can promote muscle contractions (Cotel et al. 2013). However, massive serotonin release, which may occur with very large bouts of exercise, could further exacerbate the already fatigued muscle (Perrier et al. 2018).

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. These medications keep serotonin levels high in the central nervous system by stopping the chemical from being reabsorbed by nerves (reuptake inhibition). Instead of using SSRIs to relieve symptoms of depression, we used them in our recent study (Kavanagh et al. 2019) to elevate serotonin in the central nervous system, and then determine if characteristics of fatigue are enhanced when serotonin is elevated. We performed three experiments that used maximal voluntary contractions of the biceps muscle to cause fatigue in healthy young individuals. Our main goal was to determine if excessive serotonin limits the amount of exercise that can be performed, and then determine which central or peripheral component was compromised by excessive serotonin.

WHAT DID WE FIND?

Given that SSRIs influence neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, it was not surprising that peripheral fatigue was unaltered by the medication. However, central fatigue was influenced with enhanced serotonin. The time that a maximum voluntary contraction could be held was reduced with enhanced serotonin, whereby the ability of the central nervous system to drive the muscle was compromised by 2-5%. We further explored the location of dysfunction and found that the neurons in the spinal cord that activate the muscle were 4-18% less excitable when fatiguing contractions were performed in the presence of enhanced serotonin.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPLICATIONS

The central nervous system is diverse, and the fatigue that is experienced during exercise is not just restricted to the brain. Instead, the spinal cord plays an integral role in activating muscles, and mechanisms of fatigue also occur in these lower, often overlooked, neural circuits. This is the first study to provide evidence that serotonin released onto the motoneurones contributes to central fatigue in humans.

PUBLICATION REFERENCE

Kavanagh JJ, McFarland AJ, Taylor JL. Enhanced availability of serotonin increases activation of unfatigued muscle but exacerbates central fatigue during prolonged sustained contractions. J Physiol. 597:319-332, 2019.

If you cannot access the paper, please click here to request a copy.

KEY REFERENCES

Cotel F, Exley R, Cragg SJ, Perrier JF. Serotonin spillover onto the axon initial segment of motoneurons induces central fatigue by inhibiting action potential initiation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 110:4774-4779, 2013.

Perrier JF, Rasmussen HB, Jørgensen LK, Berg RW. Intense activity of the raphe spinal pathway depresses motor activity via a serotonin dependent mechanism. Front Neural Circuits. 11:111, 2018.

AUTHOR BIO

Associate Professor Justin Kavanagh is a researcher and lecturer at Griffith University. His team explores how the central nervous system controls voluntary and involuntary movement, and he has particular interests in understanding how medications can be used to study mechanisms of human movement.

via Antidepressants help us understand why we get fatigued during exercise – Motor Impairment

 

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[TED Talk] The Brain-Changing Effects of Exercise

What’s the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory — and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Wendy Suzuki · Neuroscientist, author Wendy Suzuki is researching the science behind the extraordinary, life-changing effects that physical activity can have on the most important organ in your body: your brain.

Transcript

03:54
05:02
07:13
09:41
11:13
12:12
12:43
12:46
12:47

via The Brain-Changing Effects of Exercise

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract + References] Epilepsy, Physical Activity and Sports: A Narrative Review

Abstract

People with epilepsy (PWE) are less physically active compared with the general population. Explanations include prejudice, overprotection, unawareness, stigma, fear of seizure induction and lack of knowledge of health professionals. At present, there is no consensus on the role of exercise in epilepsy. This paper reviews the current evidence surrounding the risks and benefits associated with physical activity (PA) in this group of patients. In the last decade, several publications indicate significant benefits in physiological and psychological health parameters, including mood and cognition, physical conditioning, social interaction, quality of life, as well as potential prevention of seizure presentation. Moreover, experimental studies suggest that PA provides mechanisms of neuronal protection, related to biochemical and structural changes including release of β-endorphins and steroids, which may exert an inhibitory effect on the occurrence of abnormal electrical activity. Epileptic discharges can decrease or disappear during exercise, which may translate into reduced seizure recurrence. In some patients, exercise may precipitate seizures. Available evidence suggests that PA should be encouraged in PWE in order to promote wellbeing and quality of life. There is a need for prospective randomized controlled studies that provide stronger clinical evidence before definitive recommendations can be made.

References

1. World Health Organization. Epilepsy Fact sheet: Bulletin 999 2017 [cited 2017 December 5]. Available at:http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs999/en/.Google Scholar
2. RaiDKerrMPMcManusSJordanovaVLewisGBrughaTSEpilepsy and psychiatric comorbidity—a nationally representative population-based study: epilepsy and psychiatric morbidityEpilepsia2012;53(6):10951103.CrossRef | Google Scholar
3. AridaRMScorzaFACavalheiroEAPeruccaEMoshéSLCan people with epilepsy enjoy sports? Epilepsy Res.2012;98(1):9495.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
4. NakkenKOLøyningALøyningTGløersenGLarssonPGDoes physical exercise influence the occurrence of epileptiform EEG discharges in children? Epilepsia1997;38(3):279284.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
5. EomSLeeMKParkJ-Het alThe impact of an exercise therapy on psychosocial health of children with benign epilepsy: a pilot studyEpilepsy Behav2014;37:151156.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
6. AridaRMImpact of physical exercise therapy on behavioral and psychosocial aspects of epilepsyEpilepsy Behav.2014;40:9091.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
7. AridaRMScorzaFAda SilvaSGSchachterSCCavalheiroEAThe potential role of physical exercise in the treatment of epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2010;17(4):432435.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
8. CapovillaGKaufmanKRPeruccaEMoshéSLAridaRMEpilepsy, seizures, physical exercise, and sports: a report from the ILAE Task Force on sports and epilepsyEpilepsia2016;57(1):612.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
9. ElliottJOMooreJLLuBHealth status and behavioral risk factors among persons with epilepsy in Ohio based on the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance SystemEpilepsy Behav2008;12(3):434444.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
10. NakkenKOPhysical exercise in outpatients with epilepsyEpilepsia1999;40(5):643651.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
11. AblahEHaugAKondaKet alExercise and epilepsy: a survey of Midwest epilepsy patientsEpilepsy Behav.2009;14(1):162166.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
12. SteinhoffBJNeusüssKThegederHReimersCDLeisure time activity and physical fitness in patients with epilepsy.Epilepsia1996;37(12):12211227.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
13. AridaRMScorzaFAde AlbuquerqueMCysneirosRMde OliveiraRJCavalheiroEAEvaluation of physical exercise habits in Brazilian patients with epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2003;4(5):507510.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
14. HanKChoi-KwonSLeeS-KLeisure time physical activity in patients with epilepsy in Seoul, South KoreaEpilepsy Behav2011;20(2):321325.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
15. HinnellCWilliamsJMetcalfeAet alHealth status and health-related behaviors in epilepsy compared to other chronic conditions—a national population-based study: health status and behaviors in epilepsyEpilepsia2010;51(5):853861.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
16. CuiWZackMMKobauRHelmersSLHealth behaviors among people with epilepsy—results from the 2010 National Health Interview SurveyEpilepsy Behav2015;44:121126.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
17. WongJWirrellEPhysical activity in children/teens with epilepsy compared with that in their siblings without epilepsyEpilepsia2006;47(3):631639.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
18. SaengsuwanJBoonyaleepanSTiamkaoSDiet, exercise, sleep, sexual activity, and perceived stress in people with epilepsy in NE ThailandEpilepsy Behav2015;45:3943.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
19. ChongJKudrimotiHSLopezDCLabinerDMBehavioral risk factors among Arizonans with epilepsy: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2005/2006Epilepsy Behav2010;17(4):511519.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
20. JalavaMSillanpääMPhysical activity, health-related fitness, and health experience in adults with childhood-onset epilepsy: a controlled studyEpilepsia1997;38(4):424429.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
21. ElliottJOLuBMooreJLMcAuleyJWLongLExercise, diet, health behaviors, and risk factors among persons with epilepsy based on the California Health Interview Survey, 2005Epilepsy Behav2008;13(2):307315.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
22. GordonKEDooleyJMBrnaPMEpilepsy and activity—a population-based study: epilepsy and activityEpilepsia.2010;51(11):22542259.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
23. EppsSAKahnABHolmesPVBoss-WilliamsKAWeissJMWeinshenkerDAntidepressant and anticonvulsant effects of exercise in a rat model of epilepsy and depression comorbidityEpilepsy Behav2013;29(1):4752.CrossRef | Google Scholar
24. LernerJTSankarRMazaratiAMGalanin and epilepsyEXS2010;102:183194.Google Scholar | PubMed
25. BabyakMBlumenthalJAHermanSet alExercise treatment for major depression: maintenance of therapeutic benefit at 10 monthsPsychosom Med2000;62(5):633638.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
26. GuptaRAggarwalAExercise and rheumatoid arthritis: a low-cost intervention with major benefitsNatl Med J India.2015;28(3):132133.Google Scholar | PubMed
27. WestergrenTFegranLNilsenTHaraldstadKKittangOBBerntsenSActive play exercise intervention in children with asthma: a pilot studyBMJ Open2016;6(1):e009721.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
28. HaxhiJLetoGdi PalumboASet alExercise at lunchtime: effect on glycemic control and oxidative stress in middle-aged men with type 2 diabetesEur J Appl Physiol2016;116(3):573582.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
29. de LimaCde LiraCABAridaRMet alAssociation between leisure time, physical activity, and mood disorder levels in individuals with epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2013;28(1):4751.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
30. McAuleyJWLongLHeiseJet alA prospective evaluation of the effects of a 12-week outpatient exercise program on clinical and behavioral outcomes in patients with epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2001;2(6):592600.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
31. RothDLGoodeKTWilliamsVLFaughtEPhysical exercise, stressful life experience, and depression in adults with epilepsyEpilepsia1994;35(6):12481255.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
32. GötzeWKubickiSMunterMTeichmannJEffect of physical exercise on seizure threshold (investigated by electroencephalographic telemetry)Dis Nerv Syst1967;28(10):664667.Google Scholar
33. HorydWGryziakJNiedzielskaKZielińskiJJEffect of physical exertion on seizure discharges in the EEG of epilepsy patientsNeurol Neurochir Pol1981;15(5–6):545552.Google Scholar | PubMed
34. VanciniRLde LiraCABScorzaFAet alCardiorespiratory and electroencephalographic responses to exhaustive acute physical exercise in people with temporal lobe epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2010;19(3):504508.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
35. De LimaCVanciniRLAridaRMet alPhysiological and electroencephalographic responses to acute exhaustive physical exercise in people with juvenile myoclonic epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2011;22:718722.CrossRef | Google ScholarPubMed
36. Engel – YegerBZlotnikSShaharEChildhood-onset primary generalized epilepsy—impacts on children’s preferences for participation in out-of-school activitiesEpilepsy Behav2014;34(1):15.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
37. FerlisiMShorvonSSeizure precipitants (triggering factors) in patients with epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2014;33:101105.CrossRef | Google Scholar
38. CamfieldCCamfieldPInjuries from seizures are a serious, persistent problem in childhood onset epilepsy: a population-based studySeizure2015;27:8083.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
39. CollardSSMarlowCThe psychosocial impact of exercising with epilepsy: a narrative analysisEpilepsy Behav.2016;61:199205.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
40. BrnaPMGordonKEWoolridgeEDooleyJMWoodEPerceived need for restrictions on activity for children with epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2017;73:236239.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
41. AguirreCQuintasSRuiz-TorneroAMet alDo people with epilepsy have a different lifestyle? Epilepsy Behav.2017;74:2732.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
42. Almeida-Souza-TedrusGMStercaGSBuarquePRPhysical activity, stigma, and quality of life in patients with epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2017;77:9698.CrossRef | Google Scholar
43. HäfeleCAFreitasMPda SilvaMCRombaldiAJAre physical activity levels associated with better health outcomes in people with epilepsy? Epilepsy Behav2017;72:2834.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
44. CollardSSEllis- HillCHow do you exercise with epilepsy? Insights into the barriers and adaptations to successfully exercise with epilepsyEpilepsy Behav2017;70:6671.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
45. HäfeleCAFreitasMPGerviniBLde CarvalhoRMRombaldiAJWho are the individuals diagnosed with epilepsy using the Public Health System in the city of Pelotas, southern Brazil? Epilepsy Behav2018;78:8490.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
46. Ben-MenachemEWeight issues for people with epilepsy—a reviewEpilepsia2007;48:4245.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
47. HellierJLDudekFESpontaneous motor seizures of rats with kainate-induced epilepsy: effect of time of day and activity stateEpilepsy Res1999;35(1):4757.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
48. TutkunEAyyildizMAgarEShort-duration swimming exercise decreases penicillin-induced epileptiform EcoG activity in ratsActa Neurobiol Exp (Wars)2010;70(4):382389.Google Scholar | PubMed
49. KayacanYTutkunEArslanGAyyildizMAgarEThe effects of treadmill exercise on penicillin-induced epileptiform activityArch Med Sci2016;12(5):935940.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
50. RadakZChungHYGotoSSystemic adaptation to oxidative challenge induced by regular exerciseFree Radic Biol Med2008;44(2):153159.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
51. Peixinho-PenaLFFernandesJde AlmeidaAAet alA strength exercise program in rats with epilepsy is protective against seizuresEpilepsy Behav2012;25(3):323328.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
52. NybergJAbergMAITorenKNilssonMBen-MenachemEKuhnHGCardiovascular fitness and later risk of epilepsy: a Swedish population-based cohort studyNeurology2013;81(12):10511057.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
53. SetkowiczZMazurAPhysical training decreases susceptibility to subsequent pilocarpine-induced seizures in the rat.Epilepsy Res2006;71(2–3):142148.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
54. AridaRMScorzaFAdos SantosNFPeresCACavalheiroEAEffect of physical exercise on seizure occurrence in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy in ratsEpilepsy Res1999;37(1):4552.CrossRef | Google Scholar
55. ContetCGavériaux-RuffCMatifasACaradecCChampyM-FKiefferBLDissociation of analgesic and hormonal responses to forced swim stress using opioid receptor knockout miceNeuropsychopharmacology2006;31(8):17331744.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
56. AridaRMScorzaFAToscano-SilvaMCavalheiroEADoes exercise correct dysregulation of neurosteroid levels induced by epilepsy? Ann Neurol2010;68(6):971972.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
57. MevissenMEbertUAnticonvulsant effects of melatonin in amygdala-kindled ratsNeurosci Lett1998;257(1):1316.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
58. AridaRMScorzaCAScorzaFAGomes da SilvaSda Graça Naffah-MazzacorattiMCavalheiroEAEffects of different types of physical exercise on the staining of parvalbumin-positive neurons in the hippocampal formation of rats with epilepsyProg Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry2007;31(4):814822.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
59. AridaRMSanabriaERGda SilvaACFariaLCScorzaFACavalheiroEAPhysical training reverts hippocampal electrophysiological changes in rats submitted to the pilocarpine model of epilepsyPhysiol Behav2004;83(1):165171.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
60. AridaRMde Jesus VieiraACavalheiroEAEffect of physical exercise on kindling developmentEpilepsy Res.1998;30(2):127132.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
61. YonedaYKanmoriKIdaSKuriyamaKStress-induced alterations in metabolism of gamma-aminobutyric acid in rat brainJ Neurochem1983;40(2):350356.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
62. SouzaMAOliveiraMSFurianAFet alSwimming training prevents pentylenetetrazol-induced inhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase activity, seizures, and oxidative stressEpilepsia2009;50(4):811823.CrossRef | Google Scholar
63. BlackJEIsaacsKRAndersonBJAlcantaraAAGreenoughWTLearning causes synaptogenesis, whereas motor activity causes angiogenesis, in cerebellar cortex of adult ratsProc Natl Acad Sci USA1990;87(14):55685572.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
64. KleimJACooperNRVandenBergPMExercise induces angiogenesis but does not alter movement representations within rat motor cortexBrain Res2002;934(1):16.CrossRef | Google Scholar
65. NisticòGCirioloMRFiskinKIannoneMde MartinoARotilioGNGF restores decrease in catalase activity and increases superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity in the brain of aged ratsFree Radic Biol Med.1992;12(3):177181.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
66. CarroETrejoJLBusiguinaSTorres-AlemanICirculating insulin-like growth factor I mediates the protective effects of physical exercise against brain insults of different etiology and anatomyJ Neurosci Off J Soc Neurosci2001;21(15):56785684.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
67. OgunyemiAOGomezMRKlassDWSeizures induced by exerciseNeurology1988;38(4):6336334.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
68. SimpsonRK JrGrossmanRGSeizures after joggingN Engl J Med1989;321(12):835.Google Scholar | PubMed
69. BjørholtPGNakkenKORøhmeKHansenHLeisure time habits and physical fitness in adults with epilepsy.Epilepsia1990;31(1):8387.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
70. SchmittBThun-HohensteinLVontobelHBoltshauserESeizures induced by physical exercise: report of two cases.Neuropediatrics1994;25(01):5153.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
71. EriksenHREllertsenBGrønningsaeterHNakkenKOLøyningYUrsinHPhysical exercise in women with intractable epilepsyEpilepsia1994;35(6):12561264.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
72. SturmJWFediMBerkovicSFReutensDCExercise-induced temporal lobe epilepsyNeurology2002;59(8):12461248.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
73. WerzMAIdiopathic generalized tonic–clonic seizures limited to exercise in a young adultEpilepsy Behav.2005;6(1):98101.CrossRef | Google Scholar
74. KamelJTBadawyRACookMJExercise-induced seizures and lateral asymmetry in patients with temporal lobe epilepsyEpilepsy Behav Case Rep2014;2:2630.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
75. BennettDRSports and epilepsy: to play or not to playSemin Neurol1981;1:345357.CrossRef | Google Scholar
76. AridaRMCavalheiroEAda SilvaACScorzaFAPhysical activity and epilepsy: proven and predicted benefitsSports Med Auckl NZ2008;38(7):607615.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
77. RodenburgRMeijerAMScherphofCet alParenting and restrictions in childhood epilepsyEpilepsy Behav.2013;27(3):497503.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
78. MecarelliOMessinaPCapovillaGet alAn educational campaign toward epilepsy among Italian primary school teachersEpilepsy Behav2014;32:8491.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
79. PainterERauschJRModiACChanges in daily activity patterns of caregivers of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy: a case-controlled designEpilepsy Behav2014;31:16.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed
80. ILAE Commission ReportRestrictions for children with epilepsy. Commission of Pediatrics of the ILAE. International League Against EpilepsyEpilepsia1997;38(9):10541056.CrossRef | Google Scholar
81. KaufmanKRAnticonvulsants in sports: ethical considerationsEpilepsy Behav2007;10(2):268271.CrossRef | Google Scholar | PubMed

via Epilepsy, Physical Activity and Sports: A Narrative Review | Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences | Cambridge Core

 

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Virtual personal trainer helps seniors get more exercise at home

U of A researcher developing personalized program that brings the appeal of electronic gaming to physical therapy for older adults.

By BEV BETKOWSKI

 

A high-tech University of Alberta research project is letting seniors hit a computerized gym especially designed for their needs.

VirtualGym, an electronic game that combines the entertainment of gaming with prescribed exercises, is being put through its paces in a Calgary seniors’ residence to test its user-friendliness and appeal.

Once perfected, it will deliver at-home therapeutic exercises for seniors with chronic health issues, mobility problems or dementia, at the click of a button.

“It’s a concept of bringing rehabilitation home,” said PhD candidate Noelannah Neubauer, who helped design the program. “We already have telehealth being used by doctors, why not rehabilitation too?”

The joint research project is teaming computing scientist Eleni Stroulia and other researchers from the faculties of science and rehabilitation medicine, with support from AGE-WELL, Canada’s Technology and Aging Network.

Designed to work through Kinect, a motion sensor system originally designed for Xbox video game consoles, VirtualGym works by giving users personalized feedback as they exercise along with an onscreen avatar using a “Simon Says” theme.

“It’s designed so the exercises are completely customizable from a personal trainer or physical therapist and their progress can be monitored,” Neubauer said. By recording users’ movements through VirtualGym, therapists can remotely watch for progressions and adjust exercises accordingly.

Stroulia and her team thought their original version of VirtualGym, developed in 2015, would be a good fit for seniors, but it was a flop with their test group, who found the game too busy.

“They didn’t like it at all,” said Victor Fernandez-Cervantes, a post-doctoral researcher in computing science, who took it back to the drawing board.

Using feedback from Edmonton senior Stuart Embleton and other volunteers from the Cardiac Athletic Society of Edmonton who tried the system, Fernandez-Cervantes made VirtualGym more user-friendly.

“We wanted to design it from their point of view.”

He dialled down the noise with a less distracting and cartoonish version of the game. The screen scenery evolved from its original version—an instructional avatar exercising on snowy ground in front of a brick building—to a soothing blank-walled room with a potted plant at either side. The avatar’s build was also adjusted to reflect a more typical body shape for older adults. As well, he programmed its movements with simple but specific instructions on how to do an exercise properly, complete with correctional tools like arrows and colours that pop up if needed.

Fernandez-Cervantes is continuing to tweak VirtualGym to create a 3-D version. Right now the exercises are only partially viewable, which is a problem for seniors, Embleton believes. “If the program wants you to lift your leg and kick your foot up, you should be able to see that action from a suitable perspective,” he explained.

Other planned improvements include adding simple games to measure cognitive awareness for users. “Over time, perhaps changes in scores could reflect varying levels of cognitive impairment,” Neubauer said.

The eventual plan is to market VirtualGym widely through a spinoff company, Stroulia said.

Embleton, 77, believes seniors would use VirtualGym if it were available to them.

“Most seniors nowadays have computers and TV sets, and that, plus an optical input, is all you need to use the system. It’s going to be more and more useful as it’s further developed. It’s called a game, but it’s really a useful therapeutic process. If I had a broken hip or was frail or couldn’t drive, and needed some physical therapy, I could use a virtual gym at home,” he said.

That’s especially valuable for rural or shut-in seniors who can’t go to real-life gym classes or make regular visits to physiotherapy clinics, said Neubauer.

“We want seniors to be able to exercise more, and this provides another option for them.”

Their work on VirtualGym also offers insight and a set of guidelines for other game designers wanting to develop exercise technology for seniors, said Fernandez-Cervantes.

“When designing products, seniors need to be involved. Soon enough, everyone will be a senior.”

 

via Virtual personal trainer helps seniors get more exercise at home

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: