Posts Tagged Exoskeleton

[Abstract] Recent Advances on Lower Limb Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot

Abstract

Background: Lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot is a bionic robot, which is the product of the combination of medical technology and robot technology, simulating human walking movement. It can be mainly used for rehabilitation training of patients with lower limb dysfunction.

Objective: To provide an overview of recent lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot and introduce their respective characteristics and development.

Method: A recent lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot is divided into passive drive, pneumatic drive, hydraulic drive and motor drive. This paper reviews various representative patents related to lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot. The structural characteristics and applications of the typical lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robots are introduced.

Results: The differences between different types of lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robots are compared and analyzed, and the structural characteristics are concluded. The main problems in its development are analyzed, the development trend is foreseen, and the current and future research of the patents on lower limb exoskeleton rehabilitation robot is discussed.

Conclusion: There are a lot of patents and articles about the exoskeleton rehabilitation robots, however, if these problems can be solved, such as small size, light weight and high power output are solved at the same time, the consistency with human body will be advanced, with the combination of traditional rehabilitation medicine. It will be possible to maximize the rehabilitation of the lower limbs.

Source: Recent Advances on Lower Limb Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Robot: Ingenta Connect

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[ARTICLE] Design and Interaction Control of a New Bilateral Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Device – Full Text

Abstract

This paper proposed a bilateral upper-limb rehabilitation device (BULReD) with two degrees of freedom (DOFs). The BULReD is portable for both hospital and home environment, easy to use for therapists and patients, and safer with respect to upper-limb robotic exoskeletons. It was implemented to be able to conduct both passive and interactive training, based on system kinematics and dynamics, as well as the identification of real-time movement intention of human users. Preliminary results demonstrate the potential of the BULReD for clinical applications, with satisfactory position and interaction force tracking performance. Future work will focus on the clinical evaluation of the BULReD on a large sample of poststroke patients.

1. Introduction

In the United States, more than 700,000 people suffer from stroke each year, and approximately two-thirds of these individuals survive and require rehabilitation [1]. In New Zealand (NZ), there are an estimated 60,000 stroke survivors, and many of them have mobility impairments [2]. Stroke is the third reason for health loss and takes the proportion of 3.9 percent, especially for the group starting on middle age, suffering the stroke as a nonfatal disease in NZ [3]. Professor Caplan who studies Neurology at Harvard Medical School describes stroke as a term which is a kind of brain impairment as a result of abnormal blood supply in a portion of the brain [4]. The brain injury is most likely leading to dysfunctions and disabilities. These survivors normally have difficulties in activities of daily living, such as walking, speaking, and understanding, and paralysis or numbness of the human limbs. The goals of rehabilitation are to help survivors become as independent as possible and to attain the best possible quality of life.

Physical therapy is conventionally delivered by the therapist. While this has been demonstrated as an effective way for motor rehabilitation [5], it is time-consuming and costly. Treatments manually provided by therapists require to take place in a specific environment (in a hospital or rehabilitation center) and may last several months for enhanced rehabilitation efficacy [6]. A study by Kleim et al. [7] has shown that physical therapy like regular exercises can improve plasticity of a nervous system and then benefits motor enrichment procedures in promoting rehabilitation of brain functional models. It is a truth that physical therapy should be a preferable way to take patients into regular exercises and guided by a physical therapist, but Chang et al. [8] showed that it is a money-consuming scheme. Robot-assisted rehabilitation solutions, as therapeutic adjuncts to facilitate clinical practice, have been actively researched in the past few decades and provide an overdue transformation of the rehabilitation center from labor-intensive operations to technology-assisted operations [9]. The robot could also provide a rich stream of data from built-in sensors to facilitate patient diagnosis, customization of the therapy, and maintenance of patient records. As a popular neurorehabilitation technique, Liao et al. [10] indicated that robot-assisted therapy presents market potential due to quantification and individuation in the therapy session. The quantification of robot-assisted therapy refers that a robot can provide consistent training pattern without fatigue with the given parameter. The characterization of individuation allows therapists to customize a specific training scheme for an individual.

Many robotic devices have been developed in recent years for stroke rehabilitation and show great potential for clinical applications [1112]. Typical upper-limb rehabilitation devices are MIME, MIT-Manus, ARM Guide, NeReBot, and ARMin [51321]. Relevant evidences demonstrated that these robots are effective for upper-limb rehabilitation but mostly for the one side of the human body. Further, upper-limb rehabilitation devices can be unilateral or bilateral [2224]. Despite the argument between these two design strategies, bilateral activities are more common than unilateral activities in daily living. Liu et al. [25] pointed that the central nervous system dominates the human movement with coordinating bilateral limb to act in one unit instead of independent unilateral actions. From this point, bilateral robots are expected to be more potential than unilateral devices. Robotic devices for upper-limb rehabilitation can be also divided into two categories in terms of structure: the exoskeleton and the end-effector device [26]. Two examples of upper-limb exoskeletons are the arm exoskeleton [27] and the RUPERT IV [28]. In addition, Lum et al. [13] incorporated a PUMA 560 robot (Staubli Unimation Inc., Duncan, South Carolina) to apply forces to the paretic limbs in the MIME system. This robotic device can be made for both unilateral and bilateral movements in a three-dimensional space. To summarize, existing robotic exoskeletons for upper-limb rehabilitation are mostly for unilateral training.

There are some devices that have been specially designed for bilateral upper-limb training for poststroke rehabilitation. van Delden et al. [29] conducted a systematic review to provide an overview and qualitative evaluation of the clinical applications of bilateral upper-limb training devices. A systematic search found a total of six mechanical devices and 14 robotic bilateral upper-limb training devices, with a comparative analysis in terms of mechanical and electromechanical characteristics, movement patterns, targeted part, and active involvement of the upper limb, training protocols, outcomes of clinical trials, and commercial availability. Obviously, these mechanical devices require the human limbs to actively move for training, while the robotic ones can be operated in both passive and active modes. However, few of these robotic bilateral upper-limb training devices have been commercially available with current technology. For example, the exoskeleton presented in [30] requires the development of higher power-to-weight motors and structural materials to make it mobile and more compact.

The University of Auckland developed an end-effector ReachHab device to assist bilateral upper-limb functional recovery [31]. However, this device suffered from some limitations, such as deformation of the frame leading to significant vibration, also hard to achieve satisfactory control performance. This paper presents the design and interaction control of an improved bilateral upper-limb rehabilitation device (BULReD). This device is portable for both hospital and home environment, easy to use for therapists and patients, and safer with respect to upper-limb robotic exoskeletons. This paper is organized as follows. Following Introduction, a detailed description of the BULReD is given, including mechanical design, electrical design, kinematics, and dynamics. Then, the control design is presented for both passive training and interactive training, as well as the fuzzy-based adaptive training. Experiments and Results is introduced next and the last is Conclusion.[…]

Continue —>  Design and Interaction Control of a New Bilateral Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Device

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[ARTICLE] Post-stroke Rehabilitation Training with a Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI)-Controlled Hand Exoskeleton: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial – Full Text

Repeated use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) providing contingent sensory feedback of brain activity was recently proposed as a rehabilitation approach to restore motor function after stroke or spinal cord lesions. However, there are only a few clinical studies that investigate feasibility and effectiveness of such an approach. Here we report on a placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial that investigated whether stroke survivors with severe upper limb (UL) paralysis benefit from 10 BCI training sessions each lasting up to 40 min. A total of 74 patients participated: median time since stroke is 8 months, 25 and 75% quartiles [3.0; 13.0]; median severity of UL paralysis is 4.5 points [0.0; 30.0] as measured by the Action Research Arm Test, ARAT, and 19.5 points [11.0; 40.0] as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, FMMA. Patients in the BCI group (n = 55) performed motor imagery of opening their affected hand. Motor imagery-related brain electroencephalographic activity was translated into contingent hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand. In a control group (n = 19), hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand were independent of brain electroencephalographic activity. Evaluation of the UL clinical assessments indicated that both groups improved, but only the BCI group showed an improvement in the ARAT’s grasp score from 0 [0.0; 14.0] to 3.0 [0.0; 15.0] points (p < 0.01) and pinch scores from 0.0 [0.0; 7.0] to 1.0 [0.0; 12.0] points (p < 0.01). Upon training completion, 21.8% and 36.4% of the patients in the BCI group improved their ARAT and FMMA scores respectively. The corresponding numbers for the control group were 5.1% (ARAT) and 15.8% (FMMA). These results suggests that adding BCI control to exoskeleton-assisted physical therapy can improve post-stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Both maximum and mean values of the percentage of successfully decoded imagery-related EEG activity, were higher than chance level. A correlation between the classification accuracy and the improvement in the upper extremity function was found. An improvement of motor function was found for patients with different duration, severity and location of the stroke.

Introduction

Motor imagery (Page et al., 2001), or mental practice, attracted considerable interest as a potential neurorehabilitation technique improving motor recovery following stroke (Jackson et al., 2001). According to the Guidelines for adult stroke rehabilitation and recovery (Winstein et al., 2016), mental practice may proof beneficial as an adjunct to upper extremity rehabilitation services (Winstein et al., 2016). Several studies suggest that motor imagery can trigger neuroplasticity in ipsilesional motor cortical areas despite severe paralysis after stroke (Grosse-Wentrup et al., 2011Shih et al., 2012Mokienko et al., 2013bSoekadar et al., 2015).

The effect of motor imagery on motor function and neuroplasticity has been demonstrated in numerous neurophysiological studies in healthy subjects. Motor imagery has been shown to activate the primary motor cortex (M1) and brain structures involved in planning and control of voluntary movements (Shih et al., 2012Mokienko et al., 2013a,bFrolov et al., 2014). For example, it was shown that motor imagery of fist clenching reduces the excitation threshold of motor evoked potentials (MEP) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivered to M1 (Mokienko et al., 2013b).

As motor imagery results in specific modulations of brain electroencephalographic (EEG) signals, e.g., sensorimotor rhythms (SMR) (Pfurtscheller and Aranibar, 1979), it can be used to voluntarily control an external device, e.g., a robot or exoskeleton using a brain-computer interface (BCI) (Nicolas-Alonso and Gomez-Gil, 2012). Such system allowing for voluntary control of an exoskeleton moving a paralyzed limb can be used as an assistive device restoring lost function (Maciejasz et al., 2014). Besides receiving visual feedback, the user receives haptic and kinesthetic feedback which is contingent upon the imagination of a specific movement.

Several BCI studies involving this type of haptic and kinesthetic feedback have demonstrated improvements in clinical parameters of post-stroke motor recovery (Ramos-Murguialday et al., 2013Ang et al., 20142015Ono et al., 2014). The number of subjects with post-stroke upper extremity paresis included in these studies was, however, relatively low [from 12 (Ono et al., 2014) to 32 (Ramos-Murguialday et al., 2013) patients]. As BCI-driven external devices, a haptic knob (Ang et al., 2014), MIT-Manus (Ang et al., 2015), or a custom-made orthotic device (Ramos-Murguialday et al., 2013Ono et al., 2014) were used. Furthermore, several other studies reported on using BCI-driven exoskeletons in patients with post-stroke hand paresis (Biryukova et al., 2016Kotov et al., 2016Mokienko et al., 2016), but these reports did not test for clinical efficacy and did not include a control group. While very promising, it still remains unclear whether BCI training is an effective tool to facilitate motor recovery after stroke or other lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) (Teo and Chew, 2014).

Here we report a randomized and controlled multicenter study investigating whether 10 sessions of BCI-controlled hand-exoskeleton active training after subacute and chronic stroke yields a better clinical outcome than 10 sessions in which hand-exoskeleton induced passive movements were not controlled by motor imagery-related modulations of brain activity. Besides assessing the effect of BCI training on clinical scores such as the ARAT and FMMA, we tested whether improvements in the upper extremity function correlates with the patient’s ability to generate motor imagery-related modulations of EEG activity.[…]

Continue —> Frontiers | Post-stroke Rehabilitation Training with a Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI)-Controlled Hand Exoskeleton: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial | Neuroscience

 

Figure 1. The subject flow diagram from recruitment through analysis (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials flow diagram).

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[WEB SITE] Study Examines Exoskeleton’s Ability to Improve Walking for Stroke Patients

Conor Walsh and his graduate student, Jaehyun Bae, fine-tune an ankle-assisting exosuit. (Photo courtesy of Rolex Awards/Fred Merz)

A study published recently in Science Translational Medicine suggests that the use of a soft suit exoskeleton system helps aid in the facilitation of walking ability among ambulatory patients following a stroke.

Researchers from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), and Boston University’s (BU) College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College developed the lightweight, soft, wearable ankle-assisting exosuit, and they they suggest in the study that it could help reinforce normal gait in people with hemiparesis after stroke.

The study centers on the use of the exosuit among nine participants, each of whom recently experienced a stroke, and examines the immediate improvements in walking capability that could be obtained when wearing the suit, dubbed the Restore system, according to a media release from ReWalk Robotics Ltd.

According to the release, the study concludes that improvements in paretic limb function contributed to a 20 +/- 4% reduction in forward propulsion interlimb asymmetry and a 10 +/- 3% reduction in the energy cost of walking, which is equivalent to a 32+/- 9% reduction in the metabolic burden associated with poststroke walking.  Relatively low assistance (~12% of biological torques) delivered with a lightweight and nonrestrictive exosuit was sufficient to facilitate more normal walking in ambulatory individuals after stroke.

“This foundational study shows that soft wearable robots can have significant positive impact on gait functions in patients post-stroke, and it is the result of a translational-focused multidisciplinary team of engineers, designers, biomechanists, physical therapists, and most importantly patients who volunteered for this study and gave valuable feedback that guided our research,” says Wyss Core Faculty member Conor Walsh, who is also the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at SEAS and the Founder of the Harvard Biodesign Lab, in the release.

ReWalk is working with the Wyss Institute on the development of lightweight designs to complete clinical studies, pursue regulatory approvals, and commercialize the systems on a global scale. The first commercial application will be for stroke survivors, followed by Multiple Sclerosis patients and then additional applications.

“Exoskeletons are now a commercially available, disruptive technology that have changed the lives of many individuals in the paraplegic community,” states ReWalk CEO Larry Jasinski, in the release. “The ongoing research at the Wyss Institute on soft exosuits adds a new dimension to exoskeletons that can potentially meet the needs of individuals that have had a stroke, as well as for those diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease or people who have limitations in walking.”

[Source(s): ReWalk Robotics Ltd, PR Newswire, Science Daily]

Source: Study Examines Exoskeleton’s Ability to Improve Walking for Stroke Patients – Rehab Managment

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[Conference paper] ERRSE: Elbow Robotic Rehabilitation System with an EMG-Based Force Control – Abstract+References

Abstract

Robotic devices for rehabilitation purposes have been increasingly studied in the past two decades and are becoming more and more diffused, due to their effective support to the traditional therapy. They allow to automate in a repeatable manner the rehabilitative exercises and to quantify outcomes, giving important feedback to the therapist. This paper deals with the design, development and preliminary characterization of a robotic system, with an exoskeleton device, for assisted upper-limb rehabilitation, in which surface EMG measurements are used to implement a force-based active and resistive control. A prototype of the system has been realized, measurements of important parameters of the motion permitted to optimize the design and preliminary tests on the control strategy were carried out. 

References

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Source: ERRSE: Elbow Robotic Rehabilitation System with an EMG-Based Force Control | SpringerLink

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[Abstract] A survey on sEMG control strategies of wearable hand exoskeleton for rehabilitation

Abstract:

Surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals is one most commonly used control source of exoskeleton for hand rehabilitation. Due to the characteristics of non-invasive, convenient collection and safety, sEMG can conform to the particularity of hemiplegic patients’ physiological state and directly reflect human’s neuromuscular activity. By way of collecting, analyzing and processing, sEMG signals corresponding to identify the target movement model would be translated into robot movement control instructions and input into hand rehabilitation exoskeleton controller. Then patients’ hand can be directed to achieve the realization of the similar action finally. In this paper, the recent key technologies of sEMG-based control for hand rehabilitation robots are reviewed. Then a summarization of controlling technology principle and methods of sEMG signal processing employed by the hand rehabilitation exoskeletons is presented. Finally suitable processing methods of multi-channel sEMG signals for the controlling of hand rehabilitation exoskeleton are put forward tentatively and the practical application in hand exoskeleton control is commented also.

Source: A survey on sEMG control strategies of wearable hand exoskeleton for rehabilitation – IEEE Xplore Document

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[REVIEW] Robotic Devices and Brain Machine Interfaces for Hand Rehabilitation Post-stroke: Current State and Future Potentials – Full Text PDF

Abstract

This paper reviews the current state of the art in robotic-aided hand physiotherapy for post-stroke rehabilitation, including the use of brain machine interfaces (BMI). The main focus is on the technical specifications required for these devices to achieve their goals. From the literature reviewed, it is clear that these rehabilitation devices can increase the functionality of the human hand post-stroke. However, there are still several challenges to be overcome before they can be fully deployed. Further clinical trials are needed to ensure that substantial improvement can be made in limb functionality for stroke survivors, particularly as part of a programme of frequent at-home high-intensity training over an extended period.

This review serves the purpose of providing valuable insights into robotics rehabilitation techniques in particular for those that could explore the synergy between BMI and the novel area of soft robotics.

Introduction

Strokes are a global issue affecting people of all ethnicities, genders and ages [1]; approximately 20 million people per year worldwide suffer a stroke [2, 3]. Five million of those patients remain severely handicapped and dependent on assistance in daily life [4]. Once a stroke has occurred the patient may be left with mild to severe disabilities, depending on the type and severity of the stroke. This paper will focus on the primary issues experienced which are the clawing of the hand and stiffening of the wrist. In recent years, several new forms of rehabilitation have been proposed using robot-aided therapy. This work reviews the current state-ofthe-art robotic devices and brain-machine interfaces (BMI) for post-stroke hand rehabilitation, analysing current challenges, highlighting the future potential and addressing any inherent ethical issues.[…]

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[ARTICLE] Hemorrhagic versus ischemic stroke: Who can best benefit from blended conventional physiotherapy with robotic-assisted gait therapy? – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Contrary to common belief of clinicians that hemorrhagic stroke survivors have better functional prognoses than ischemic, recent studies show that ischemic survivors could experience similar or even better functional improvements. However, the influence of stroke subtype on gait and posture outcomes following an intervention blending conventional physiotherapy with robotic-assisted gait therapy is missing.

Objective

This study compared gait and posture outcome measures between ambulatory hemorrhagic patients and ischemic patients, who received a similar 4 weeks’ intervention blending a conventional bottom-up physiotherapy approach and an exoskeleton top-down robotic-assisted gait training (RAGT) approach with Lokomat.

Methods

Forty adult hemiparetic stroke inpatient subjects were recruited: 20 hemorrhagic and 20 ischemic, matched by age, gender, side of hemisphere lesion, stroke severity, and locomotor impairments. Functional Ambulation Category, Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke, Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, 6 Minutes Walk Test, Timed Up and Go and 10-Meter Walk Test were performed before and after a 4-week long intervention. Functional gains were calculated for all tests.

Results

Hemorrhagic and ischemic subjects showed significant improvements in Functional Ambulation Category (P<0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively), Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (P<0.001 and P = 0.003), 6 Minutes Walk Test (P = 0.003 and P = 0.015) and 10-Meter Walk Test (P = 0.001 and P = 0.024). Ischemic patients also showed significant improvements in Timed Up and Go. Significantly greater mean Functional Ambulation Category and Tinetti Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment gains were observed for hemorrhagic compared to ischemic, with large (dz = 0.81) and medium (dz = 0.66) effect sizes, respectively.

Conclusion

Overall, both groups exhibited quasi similar functional improvements and benefits from the same type, length and frequency of blended conventional physiotherapy and RAGT protocol. The use of intensive treatment plans blending top-down physiotherapy and bottom-up robotic approaches is promising for post-stroke rehabilitation.

Continue —>  Hemorrhagic versus ischemic stroke: Who can best benefit from blended conventional physiotherapy with robotic-assisted gait therapy?

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[VIDEO] Fourier X1 Exoskeleton – Fourier Intelligence – YouTube

Δημοσιεύτηκε στις 23 Μαρ 2017

At Fourier Intelligence, we do not believe these people are fated to sit on the wheelchair in their rest life. To let them stand up, and to allow them to walk again, we started to develop a genuinely new exoskeleton products- The Fourier X1

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[ARTICLE] A wearable exoskeleton suit for motion assistance to paralysed patients – Full Text

Summary

Background/Objective

The number of patients paralysed due to stroke, spinal cord injury, or other related diseases is increasing. In order to improve the physical and mental health of these patients, robotic devices that can help them to regain the mobility to stand and walk are highly desirable. The aim of this study is to develop a wearable exoskeleton suit to help paralysed patients regain the ability to stand up/sit down (STS) and walk.

Methods

A lower extremity exoskeleton named CUHK-EXO was developed with considerations of ergonomics, user-friendly interface, safety, and comfort. The mechanical structure, human-machine interface, reference trajectories of the exoskeleton hip and knee joints, and control architecture of CUHK-EXO were designed. Clinical trials with a paralysed patient were performed to validate the effectiveness of the whole system design.

Results

With the assistance provided by CUHK-EXO, the paralysed patient was able to STS and walk. As designed, the actual joint angles of the exoskeleton well followed the designed reference trajectories, and assistive torques generated from the exoskeleton actuators were able to support the patient’s STS and walking motions.

Conclusion

The whole system design of CUHK-EXO is effective and can be optimised for clinical application. The exoskeleton can provide proper assistance in enabling paralysed patients to STS and walk.

Continue —> A wearable exoskeleton suit for motion assistance to paralysed patients

 

Figure 1

Figure 1. The wearable exoskeleton suit CUHK-EXO. (A) A patient with the wearable exoskeleton suit CUHK-EXO supported by a pair of smart crutches; (B) diagram of the overall mechanical structure of CUHK-EXO; (C) waist structure of CUHK-EXO; (D) thigh structure of CUHK-EXO; (E) shank structure of CUHK-EXO. (F) foot structure of CUHK-EXO.

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