Posts Tagged FES

[VIDEO] Bioness L300 Go Technology Introduction – YouTube

Published on Sep 25, 2017
L300 Go is a functional electrical stimulation (FES) system that satisfies the productivity demands of today’s value-based healthcare system. Key aspects of the L300 experience have been dramatically improved with 3D Motion Detection, multi-channel stimulation, Smart Bluetooth® programming and a home user mobile app that tracks activity to keep patients engaged in the rehabilitation process. All of this in a streamlined design, with a fitting process that is faster and easier than ever before.
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[WEB SITE] Bioness Announces Commercial Availability of the L300 Go™ System to Healthcare Professionals

Source: Bioness Announces Commercial Availability of the L300 Go™ System to Healthcare Professionals

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[Abstract] Design and Test of a Closed-Loop FES System for Supporting Function of the Hemiparetic Hand Based on Automatic Detection Using the Microsoft Kinect Sensor

Abstract
This paper describes the design of a FES system automatically controlled in a closed loop using a Microsoft Kinect sensor, for assisting both cylindrical grasping and hand opening. The feasibility of the system was evaluated in real-time in stroke patients with hand function deficits. A hand function exercise was designed in which the subjects performed an arm and hand exercise in sitting position. The subject had to grasp one of two differently sized cylindrical objects and move it forward or backwards in the sagittal plane. This exercise was performed with each cylinder with and without FES support. Results showed that the stroke patients were able to perform up to 29% more successful grasps when they were assisted by FES. Moreover, the hand grasp-and-hold and hold-and-release durations were shorter for the smaller of the two cylinders. FES was appropriately timed in more than 95% of all trials indicating successful closed loop FES control. Future studies should incorporate options for assisting forward reaching in order to target a larger group of stroke patients.

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[Abstract] Preliminary results of testing the recoveriX system on stroke patients 

Abstract

Motor imagery based brain-computer interfaces (BCI) extract the movement intentions of subjects in real-time and can be used to control a cursor or medical devices. In the last years, the control of functional electrical stimulation (FES) devices drew researchers’ attention for the post-stroke rehabilitation field. In here, a patient can use the movement imagery to artificially induce movements of the paretic arms through FES in real-time.

Five patients who had a stroke that affected the motor system participated in the current study, and were trained across 10 to 24 sessions lasting about 40 min each with the recoveriX® system. The patients had to imagine 80 left and 80 right hand movements. The electroencephalogram (EEG) data was analyzed with Common Spatial Patterns (CSP) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and a feedback was provided in form of a cursor on a computer screen. If the correct imagination was classified, the FES device was also activated to induce the right or left hand movement.

In at least one session, all patients were able to achieve a maximum accuracy above 96%. Moreover, all patients exhibited improvements in motor function. On one hand, the high accuracies achieved within the study show that the patients are highly motivated to participate into a study to improve their lost motor functions. On the other hand, this study reflects the efficacy of combining motor imagination, visual feedback and real hand movement that activates tactile and proprioceptive systems.

Source: O174 Preliminary results of testing the recoveriX system on stroke patients – Clinical Neurophysiology

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[Abstract] Towards an ankle neuroprosthesis for hybrid robotics: Concepts and current sources for functional electrical stimulation

Abstract:

Hybrid rehabilitation robotics combine neuro-prosthetic devices (close-loop functional electrical stimulation systems) and traditional robotic structures and actuators to explore better therapies and promote a more efficient motor function recovery or compensation. Although hybrid robotics and ankle neuroprostheses (NPs) have been widely developed over the last years, there are just few studies on the use of NPs to electrically control both ankle flexion and extension to promote ankle recovery and improved gait patterns in paretic limbs. The aim of this work is to develop an ankle NP specifically designed to work in the field of hybrid robotics. This article presents early steps towards this goal and makes a brief review about motor NPs and Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) principles and most common devices used to aid the ankle functioning during the gait cycle. It also shows a current sources analysis done in this framework, in order to choose the best one for this intended application.

Source: Towards an ankle neuroprosthesis for hybrid robotics: Concepts and current sources for functional electrical stimulation – IEEE Xplore Document

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[VIDEO] WalkAide® Demonstration – YouTube

Published on Mar 29, 2012

WalkAide® patient Connie Fowble demonstrates how the Walkaide® benefits her daily life. She shows the previous orthotic device that she used prior to being fit with the Walkaide®. For more information call 877-4HANGER or visit http://www.hanger.com.

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[Technology News] Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market 2017 – Bioness INC, Otto Bock, Odstock Medical Limited 

Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market studies the competitive landscape view of the industry. The Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) report also includes development plans and policies along with manufacturing processes. The major regions involved in Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market are (United States, EU, China, and Japan).

For Sample Copy Of The Report Click Here: http://qyresearch.us/report/global-functional-electrical-stimulation-device-fes-market-2017/41817/#inquiry

Leading Manufacturers Analysis in Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market 2017:

1 Bioness INC
2 Otto Bock
3 Odstock Medical Limited
4 Trulife
5 XFT
6 MotoMed

Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market: Type Segment Analysis

Wire
Wireless

Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market: Applications Segment Analysis

Personal FES
Commercial FES

The Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) report does the thorough study of the key industry players to understand their business strategies, annual revenue, company profile and their contribution to the global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market share. Diverse factors of the Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) industry like the supply chain scenario, industry standards, import/export details are also mentioned in Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market 2017 report.

Key Highlights of the Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market:

A Clear understanding of the Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market based on growth, constraints, opportunities, feasibility study.

Concise Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market study based on major geographical regions.

Analysis of evolving market segments as well as a complete study of existing Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market segments.

Discover More About Report Here: http://qyresearch.us/report/global-functional-electrical-stimulation-device-fes-market-2017/41817/

Furthermore, distinct aspects of Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market like the technological development, economic factors, opportunities and threats to the growth of Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market are covered in depth in this report. The performance of Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market during 2017 to 2022 is being forecasted in this report.

In conclusion, Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) market 2017 report presents the descriptive analysis of the parent market based on elite players, present, past and futuristic data which will serve as a profitable guide for all the Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) industry competitors.

Source: Global Functional Electrical Stimulation Device (FES) Market 2017 – Bioness INC, Otto Bock, Odstock Medical Limited | The First Newshawk

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[ARTICLE] Robot Assisted Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke (RATULS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial – Full Text

Abstract

Background

Loss of arm function is a common and distressing consequence of stroke. We describe the protocol for a pragmatic, multicentre randomised controlled trial to determine whether robot-assisted training improves upper limb function following stroke.

Methods/design

Study design: a pragmatic, three-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial, economic analysis and process evaluation.

Setting: NHS stroke services.

Participants: adults with acute or chronic first-ever stroke (1 week to 5 years post stroke) causing moderate to severe upper limb functional limitation.

Randomisation groups:

1. Robot-assisted training using the InMotion robotic gym system for 45 min, three times/week for 12 weeks

2. Enhanced upper limb therapy for 45 min, three times/week for 12 weeks

3. Usual NHS care in accordance with local clinical practice

Randomisation: individual participant randomisation stratified by centre, time since stroke, and severity of upper limb impairment.

Primary outcome: upper limb function measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 3 months post randomisation.

Secondary outcomes: upper limb impairment (Fugl-Meyer Test), activities of daily living (Barthel ADL Index), quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, EQ-5D-5L), resource use, cost per quality-adjusted life year and adverse events, at 3 and 6 months.

Blinding: outcomes are undertaken by blinded assessors.

Economic analysis: micro-costing and economic evaluation of interventions compared to usual NHS care. A within-trial analysis, with an economic model will be used to extrapolate longer-term costs and outcomes.

Process evaluation: semi-structured interviews with participants and professionals to seek their views and experiences of the rehabilitation that they have received or provided, and factors affecting the implementation of the trial.

Sample size: allowing for 10% attrition, 720 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in successful outcome between each of the treatment pairs. Successful outcome definition: baseline ARAT 0–7 must improve by 3 or more points; baseline ARAT 8–13 improve by 4 or more points; baseline ARAT 14–19 improve by 5 or more points; baseline ARAT 20–39 improve by 6 or more points.

Discussion

The results from this trial will determine whether robot-assisted training improves upper limb function post stroke.

Background

Stroke is the commonest cause of complex adult disability in high-income countries [1]. Loss of arm function affects 69% of people who have a stroke [2]. Only 12% of people with arm weakness at the onset of stroke make a full recovery [3]. Improving arm function has been identified as a research priority by stroke survivors, carers and health professionals who report that current rehabilitation pays insufficient attention to arm recovery [4].

Robot-assisted training enables a greater number of repetitive tasks to be practised in a consistent and controllable manner. Repetitive task training is known to drive Hebbian plasticity, where wiring of pathways that are coincidently active is strengthened [5, 6]. A dose of greater than 20 h of repetitive task training improves upper limb motor recovery following a stroke [7] and, therefore, robot-assisted training has the potential to improve arm motor recovery after stroke. We anticipate that Hebbian neuroplasticity, which is learning dependent, will operate regardless of the post-stroke phase.

A Cochrane systematic review of electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training after stroke reported outcomes from a total of 1160 patients who participated in 34 randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Improvements in arm function (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.35, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.18–0.51) and activities of daily living (SMD 0.37, 95% CI, 0.11–0.64) were found in patients who received this treatment, but studies were often of low quality [8]. In the UK there is currently insufficient evidence to justify the use of this technology in routine clinical practice.

In addition, studies which suggest that robot-assisted training may improve upper limb function after stroke should be treated with caution as participants who were randomised to receive robot-assisted training may have also received an increased intensity of rehabilitation sessions (e.g. frequency or duration) compared to participants in the control groups. Greater intensity of upper limb rehabilitation sessions has been shown to improve upper limb functional outcomes [7], and a meta-analysis of robot-assisted training RCTs reported that if control group therapy sessions were delivered at the same frequency and duration, there was no additional functional improvement [9]. Studies are required which provide further direct evidence of the effectiveness of robot-assisted training without the confounding effect of therapy dose.

The aim of the Robot Assisted Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke (RATULS) trial is to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of robot-assisted training compared to an upper limb therapy programme of the same frequency and duration, and usual post-stroke care.

The null hypothesis is that there is no difference in upper limb function at 3 months between study participants who receive robot-assisted training and those who receive an enhanced upper limb therapy programme and those who receive usual post-stroke care. The RATULS trial will be making comparisons of the effectiveness of rehabilitation on upper limb function between all three pairs of trial arms.

Source: Robot Assisted Training for the Upper Limb after Stroke (RATULS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial | Trials | Full Text

 

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[WEB SITE] Integration of FES Into G-EO System Gait Trainer Receives FDA Nod

Reha Technology USA Inc announces it now offers FDA-approved integrated Functional Electronic Stimulation (FES) for its G-EO System Evolution robotic gait trainer.

“The FES in conjunction with the G-EO System will allow clinicians to generate contractions in paralyzed or weakened muscles in lower extremities at the appropriate time in the walking cycle to maximize patient outcomes,” says Matthew Brooks, clinical director of Reha Technology USA Inc, in a media release.

The G-EO System robotic gait trainer provides passive and active, assistive and resistive training and the simulation of stairs walking up and down.

“We look forward to add this integrated FES feature to all of our current and future customers and we are confident that this extended offering will create added value for their therapy environment,” adds executive VP Paul Abrams, in the release.

[Source(s): Reha Technology USA Inc, PR Newswire]

Source: Integration of FES Into G-EO System Gait Trainer Receives FDA Nod – Rehab Managment

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[BLOG POST] Foot Drop Implants Market Analysis and Forecasts 2025

Foot drop can be defined as an abnormality in the gait where the forefoot drops due to factors such as weakness of the ankle and toe dorsiflexion. The abnormality is also caused by paralysis of the muscles in the anterior portion of the lower leg or damage to the fibular nerve. Foot drop can be associated with various conditions, including peripheral nerve injuries, neuropathies, drug toxicities, dorsiflexor injuries, and diabetes. Anatomic, muscular, and neurologic are the three categories of foot drop.

Functional electrical stimulation technology is employed in the foot drop implant to improve the gait of patients and avoid foot drop or tripping while walking. Functional electric stimulators (FES) can either be implanted within the patient’s body or employed externally. External FES is tested on the patient prior to its implantation. Implant FES involves a surgery in which the electrodes are directly placed on the nerves of the patient, which are controlled by the implant placed under the skin. The FES device activates the implant through a wireless antenna that is worn outside the body. Sensors are also associated with FES which trigger events in the walking pattern such as lifting of the heel, thereby stimulating the nerves.

The advantages of implant FES include reduction in sensation that is associated with external stimulation. In addition, it eliminates the need to adjust the electrodes on the skin on a daily basis. Rise in number of foot drop disorders due to nerve injuries, growth in knee and hip replacement therapies that lead to foot drop disorders, and increase in the number of sports related injuries contribute to the growth of the foot drop implants market. Foot drop disorders are commonly observed in diabetic retinopathy patients and this prevalence is growing due to increase in incidence of diabetes, which is propelling the growth of the market. Furthermore, the market players are focus on research and development to increase the number of foot drop implant products available in the market, driving the market growth. However, lack of reimbursement, high cost of the implants, and low awareness among the people are likely to hinder the growth of the foot drop implants market in the near future.

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The global foot drop implants market can be segmented on the basis of product, end-user, and region. On the basis of product, the market is categorized into functional electrical stimulators and internal fixation devices. The internal fixation devices segment is anticipated to record a significant growth during the forecast period owing to increasing demand for the devices and advantages offered by these devices such as elimination of the need to stimulate the electrodes daily. Based on end-user, the market can be segmented into hospitals, orthopedic centers, and palliative care centers, among others. The orthopedic centers segment is anticipated to record a high growth during the forecast period due to the increasing number of foot drop cases due to injuries.

Geographically, the foot drop implants market is distributed over North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Middle East & Africa. North America dominated the market in 2016 and is anticipated to continue its dominance during the forecast period. The significant growth of the market in the region can be attributed to the strong focus on research and development, increase in health care spending, and growth in awareness about the abnormality. The sluggish economy might have a negative impact on the market growth of Europe. Asia Pacific is anticipated to record a high CAGR during the forecast period, primarily driven by India and China. The rising disposable income is anticipated to contribute to the growth of the Asia Pacific market. In addition, a factor contributing to the market growth is rise in prevalence of diabetes that leads to diabetic retinopathy, which is one of the primary causes of foot drop.

View Report @ http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/foot-drop-implants-market.html

Key players operating in the foot drop implants market include Finetech Medical, Arthrex, Inc., Zimmer Biomet, Bioness Inc., Stryker Corporation, Wright Medical Group N.V., Ottobock, Narang Medical Limited, PONTiS Orthopaedics, LLC, and Shanghai MicroPort Orthopedics.

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Source: Foot Drop Implants Market Analysis and Forecasts 2025 | Medgadget

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