Posts Tagged flying

[BLOG POST] Flying with a brain injury: my first long flight – Finding a new normal

Flying is my least favourite mode of transportation. Unfortunately it’s also the most convenient way to travel outside of Europe.

After my brain injury I was very curious about whether or not I’d still be able to fly (by myself). This called for an experiment.

Trying out flying

My first flight was a year and a half after my brain injury. At that time I could handle far less compared to the situation now. I had far less energy and got overstimulated very easily. Or maybe I had yet to discover how I should handle the ‘new me’.

So I avoided places with a lot of people. As fifteen minutes in a busy place would deteriorate my speech, thinking and balance quickly. Flying thus was written of in advance.

Luckily someone told me about the special assistence you can request when you plan to fly. This service makes it easier for people with any kind of disability to travel by plane. Once requested in advance, someone will escort you all the way into the plane. Which means that you get a lot faster through the airport and can save some precious energy. This service made flying suddenly a possibility.

And as a result I had two succesful flights within Europe. Which meant that it was time for the next step. To take a long flight and to try it without any kind of assistance.

A ten hour flight

That long flight was my flight to Sri Lanka last week. This time, not the airport but the flight itself was the most challenging. In the airport I had my earplugs, noise cancelling headphones and sunglasses and could hide out in a quiet corner. I even made a reservation for an airport lounge to rest in, which almost made me forget I was at an airport.

In the plane however, you can’t leave. Blocking out the world is a whole lot harder if there’s nowhere for you to go. This made the flight challenging, thought the last three hours of turbulance might also be to blame. Still I learned some lessons for my next flight in five weeks.

Know your triggers

I always find travel days extremely stressful. Nine out of ten times this culminates in a panic attack. This time was no different. Thankfully I recognised I was having a panic attack early on, so I could do something about it.

Follow your gut

If you notice that you stress yourself out over something, try and do something about it. I kept chaecking my watch every other minute, because I was afraid to be late. After an hour of annoying myself I finally decided to just go to the airport way too early. Looking back I should have done that earlier.

Plan your route

Nowadays, I think you can find the map of almost all airports online. This means that you can plan where to go in advance. Knowing where the lounges, quiet areas or prayer rooms are located beforehand can give you some piece of mind. Once you’ve passed security at the airport you already know the shortest way to where you plan to rest.

Keep a choice of distractions ready

Once you’re seated in the plane, it’s a matter of sitting it through. Of waiting until the plane has landed and you can get off. I discovered that I can’t read or watch tv on a plane. My mp3 player is therefore filled with different kinds of music. Music to sleep, to distract or to cancel out other noises. Make sure you have the option of distractions for the duration of the flight.

Keep yourself hydrated

Any time you get offered a drink on the plane, take it. Not only will it help you to stay hydrated (so don’t pick an alcoholic drink) it’ll force you to go to the toilet. In other words to stand up and walk around.

After care

The second or third day after the flight, I’ll feel the consequences. So listen to your body. If you need to sleep for 12 hours, do that. If you crave sugary or salty snacks, have those. Flying is hard and challenging, so take some recovery days into account and allow yourself some rest.

– I can only speak from my own exprience, so do check with your doctor if you have specific requirements to take into account when flying –

What do you do when you fly? Do you have or need something special that really helps you?

via Flying with a brain injury: my first long flight – Finding a new normal

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[BLOG POST] Guidelines To Flying After A Stroke – Saebo

After suffering from a stroke, it is likely that a survivor will have limited activity. Issues with daily routines and general mobility are common, but one of the most difficult factors to consider is the idea of traveling by plane.

Transporting yourself or a loved one who has just battled a stroke can seem frightening, and with good reason. In most cases, neurological damage from a stroke has impacted the body, which creates concern when placing an individual into an environment where altitude and air pressure are variables. But as risky as it may appear, flying poses no immediate threat to a stroke survivor as long as necessary precautions are taken.

Is it Safe to Fly After a Stroke?

When it comes down to a stroke survivor’s ability to fly, the answer is yes. Flying shouldn’t be a detriment to a survivor’s health, but there are several things to consider before booking a ticket.

Timing

First off, it is crucial to avoid flying within the first couple weeks of having a stroke. This span can reveal some of the strongest signs of mental and physical impairment, so giving a survivor time to adjust is important. In any situation, make sure to consult with a doctor before making travel plans.

Less Oxygen

Once you or a loved one are on board, another factor to keep in mind is the amount of oxygen available on an aircraft. Typically, cabins provide less oxygen than a normal environment, so if one has any respiratory issues or heart complications, this is something to account for. Generally speaking, lower oxygen levels shouldn’t cause a problem, but making sure you or a loved one are comfortable is always a top priority.

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

No matter who you are, sitting for a long time can cause pain in your muscles, especially your legs. For shorter flights (one to two hours), inactivity may not be so severe, but longer flights (5 hours or more) are a different story. When seated for an extended time, blood flow in the body begins to slow down, making it easier for blood to clot. Basically, Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot that forms within a vein, mostly occurring in the legs.

Cases of a DVT have the ability to become more severe if a small clot dislodges itself and travels to the lungs, heart, or brain. As scary as this may sound, a DVT can happen to anybody during long-distance travel, so there is no need to worry too much, but those who have a history of stroke are more prone to experiencing it. The best way to avoid having a DVT is to stand and stretch every hour so that blood circulates efficiently. If standing is not possible, then manually bending the arms and legs is a good alternative.

Hypercoagulability (Thrombophilia)

For some individuals, a condition known as hypercoagulability (formally known as Thrombophilia) can be a serious issue to consider before flying. Hypercoagulability is an abnormality that heightens the risk of blood clotting. Check with your doctor regarding treatment options such as blood thinners or compression stockings. It is also most likely to be a concern for those who have suffered from a DVT in the past. If you have or a loved one has experienced a DVT, talk with your doctor to see if you may be susceptible to hypercoagulability.

What Medication Should I Take to Fly?

When it comes to medication, being prepared is key. Flights are notorious for running late and experiencing delays, so it is highly recommended that you pack whatever medications you may need into your carry-on luggage. In the off-chance that your carry-on luggage needs to be checked, you can get innovative and pack your necessities into a purse or backpack that you can carry with you at all times. Most airlines allow you to bring liquid medications or dietary supplements on board, but checking your airline’s safety regulations beforehand is always a good idea. To provide additional support, consider getting a note or prescription from your primary doctor that lists the medication you will be taking with you; that way, you can avoid any potential interruptions.

What Extra Steps Will There Be For Me?

Along with making arrangements for the actual flight, it is extremely helpful to take advantage of every opportunity the airline itself can provide. For example, if you know in advance that your itinerary will be strenuous, you can call the airline before your trip—preferably 48 hours prior—to discuss any concerns.

More than likely, your airline will accommodate you as much as possible, but remember that crew members are not allowed to give any kind of physical, individualized care. If you or a loved one cannot perform certain physical requirements, or if there is limited mobility, it may be a good idea to travel with a friend or an affordable attendant that can assist in any situation.

If any kind of portable equipment is needed for air travel, the majority of airlines will store up to two items free of charge; however, substantial items—a wheelchair or something larger—must be checked.

In the Air Again

Being a stroke survivor certainly comes with its challenges, but it doesn’t mean that you or a loved one can’t live a full life. With any serious medical condition, a certain level of patience and resilience is required to prevail, and traveling via plane is doable with the right amount of support.

If you or a loved one plan to fly in the future, make sure to get the proper clearance and guidance from a healthcare professional, and check with the airline on the assistance they can offer. By asking questions and being prepared, you can ensure that your next trip will be successful. For more answers on common questions about recovering after a stroke, click here.

via Guidelines To Flying After A Stroke | Saebo

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