Posts Tagged Functionality

[Abstract + References] Investigation of the effects of mirror therapy on the spasticity, motor function and functionality of impaired upper limbs in chronic stroke patients

Background/Aims

Strokes lead to different levels of disability. During the chronic stage, hemiparesis, spasticity and motor deficits may cause loss of functional independence. Mirror therapy aims to reduce deficits and increase functional recovery of the impaired upper limb. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy on upper limb spasticity and motor function, as well as its impact on functional independence in chronic hemiparetic patients.

Methods

In this quasi-experimental study, eight chronic hemiparetic patients (age 55.5 ± 10.8 years) were assessed to determine their degree of spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale), level of upper limb motor function (Fugl-Meyer Assessment) and functionality (Functional Independence Measure). All participants received 12 sessions of mirror therapy delivered three times per week, over a period of 4 weeks. Participants were re-evaluated post-intervention and these results were compared to their pre-intervention scores to determine the impact of mirror therapy.

Results

A decrease in spasticity was observed, with significant improvements in shoulder extensors (P=0.033) and a significant increase in motor function (P=0.002). The therapeutic protocol adopted did not have a significant effect on functional independence (P=0.105).

Conclusions

Mirror therapy led to improvements in upper limb spasticity and motor function in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. No effects on functional independence were observed. Further research with a larger number of patients is needed to provide more robust evidence of the benefits of mirror therapy in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients.

 

References

via Investigation of the effects of mirror therapy on the spasticity, motor function and functionality of impaired upper limbs in chronic stroke patients | International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation

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[Abstract] Midfemoral Bone Volume of Walking Subjects with Chronic Hemiparesis Post Stroke

Background and Purpose

Muscle and bone form a functional unit. Residual physical poststroke impairments such as muscle weakness, spasticity, and decrease in function can promote metabolic bone changes. Moreover, muscle strength can influence this process. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate bone volume and mobility performance in subjects with chronic hemiparesis post stroke.

Methods

cross-sectional study was performed on 14 subjects post stroke who were paired with healthy controls. Bone volume, isometric muscle performance, and mobility levels were measured. Midfemoral bone volumes were determined using magnetic resonance imaging, and muscular performance was measured by dynamometry. Mobility was measured using the Timed Up and Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test.

Results

Regarding bone volume total, there was no difference in the medullary and cortical groups (P ≥ .05). During torque peak isometric flexion, the paretic group was significantly different compared with the other groups (P = .001). However, the control presented no difference compared with the nonparetic limb (P = .40). With regard to the extension isometric torque peak, the paretic limb was significantly different compared with the nonparetic (P = .033) and the control (P = .001) limbs, and the control was different from the nonparetic limb (P = .045). Bone volume variables correlated with the isometric torque peak.

Conclusions

Chronic hemiparetic subjects maintain bone geometry compared with healthy volunteers matched by age, body mass index, and gender. The correlation between bone volume midfemoral structures and knee isometric torque was possible.

 

via Midfemoral Bone Volume of Walking Subjects with Chronic Hemiparesis Post Stroke – ScienceDirect

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