Posts Tagged Game-based

[Abstract] Mobile Game-based Virtual Reality Program for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation

Abstract

Stroke rehabilitation requires repetitive, intensive, goal-oriented therapy. Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to satisfy these requirements. Game-based therapy can promote patients’ engagement in rehabilitation therapy as a more interesting and a motivating tool. Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs can provide personalized home-based therapy with interactive communication between patients and clinicians. In this study, a mobile VR upper extremity rehabilitation program using game applications was developed. The findings from the study show that the mobile game-based VR program effectively promotes upper extremity recovery in patients with stroke. In addition, patients completed two weeks of treatment using the program without adverse effects and were generally satisfied with the program. This mobile game-based VR upper extremity rehabilitation program can substitute for some parts of the conventional therapy that are delivered one-on-one by an occupational therapist. This time-efficient, easy to implement, and clinically effective program would be a good candidate tool for tele-rehabilitation for upper extremity recovery in patients with stroke. Patients and therapists can collaborate remotely through these e-health rehabilitation programs while reducing economic and social costs.

 

via Mobile Game-based Virtual Reality Program for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation. – PubMed – NCBI

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[WEB SITE] How virtual reality is changing physiotherapy for the better

VR, disabilities
Several hospitals in the UAE have shown interest in adopting these technology-based therapies that can have significant impact on people with disabilities.

Virtual reality and 3D-based video games are fast becoming popular alternatives to physiotherapy.

Physiotherapists and clinicians are now working closely with computer experts to design computer games that would promote specific body movements – notably shoulder, elbow, knee and hip movements – needed in therapy. With proper instructions from therapists, the game developers also set instructions and create personalised exercise plans for patients, keeping in mind the movements and difficulty faced by specific patient.

Dr. Imad Afyouni, Assistant Professor in Computer Science at the University of Sharjah, introduced the interesting facts about the cutting-edge technology to the audience as he delivered a lecture on game-based physiotherapy solutions at the Sharjah Centre for Astronomy and Space Sciences as part of the UAE Innovation Month in Sharjah.

“It is catching fast because it is non-invasive, home-based, highly accurate, and laced with intelligent alerting and automatic correction system. Several hospitals in the UAE have shown interest in adopting these technology-based therapies that can have significant impact on people with disabilities, people injured badly due to accidents as well as people with special needs in our society,” he said.

Usually patients go to rehabilitation centres or physiotherapy centres for conventional treatments like occupational therapies to make muscles and bones getting right positions. Now there are much more effective treatments available, which have been developed jointly by experts in computer science and physiotherapy.

“In many cases, patients are suggested to exercise at home after a few sessions at the therapy centre. But, people get bored by the repetitive exercises. Sometimes, it fails to show the desired results because it is not practiced under the supervision of a qualified therapist. Now we are making these therapies work effectively without invasive censors on the body,” he said.

“We develop games to engage them in virtual environment, so that they do the required exercise while playing games. It’s fun way to achieve a task that can be painful and boring if practiced in conventional manner,” he added.

The Sharjah Innovation Week is being celebrated from February 15th-21st as part of the UAE Innovation Month at Al Majaz Waterfront and the Sharjah Centre for Astronomy and Space Sciences.

 

via How virtual reality is changing physiotherapy for the better

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[Abstract] Mobile game-based virtual reality rehabilitation program for upper limb dysfunction after ischemic stroke.

Source: Mobile game-based virtual reality rehabilitation program for upper limb dysfunction after ischemic stroke – IOS Press

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[ARTICLE] What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study. – Full Text

Abstract

Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process.

Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients’ places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential.

For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey – interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey – a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan.

Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately selected) games to be operated on commodity hardware and brings cost-effective rehabilitation systems to more and more patients’ home for long-term recovery.

Continue —>  What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitatio… : Medicine

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[ARTICLE] Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

Fig. 1 The portable YouGrabber system. a A patient playing the Airplane game on the portable YouGrabber system. b The complete data glove with sensor-“box”, bending sensors, and vibrating units attached to the size fit neoprene glove. c The complete equipment packed for “take away”

Abstract

Background

Home-based, computer-enhanced therapy of hand and arm function can complement conventional interventions and increase the amount and intensity of training, without interfering too much with family routines. The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility and usability of the new portable version of the YouGrabber® system (YouRehab AG, Zurich, Switzerland) in the home setting.

Methods

Fifteen families of children (7 girls, mean age: 11.3y) with neuromotor disorders and affected upper limbs participated. They received instructions and took the system home to train for 2 weeks. After returning it, they answered questions about usability, motivation, and their general opinion of the system (Visual Analogue Scale; 0 indicating worst score, 100 indicating best score; ≤30 not satisfied, 31–69 average, ≥70 satisfied). Furthermore, total pure playtime and number of training sessions were quantified. To prove the usability of the system, number and sort of support requests were logged.

Results

The usability of the system was considered average to satisfying (mean 60.1–93.1). The lowest score was given for the occurrence of technical errors. Parents had to motivate their children to start (mean 66.5) and continue (mean 68.5) with the training. But in general, parents estimated the therapeutic benefit as high (mean 73.1) and the whole system as very good (mean 87.4). Children played on average 7 times during the 2 weeks; total pure playtime was 185 ± 45 min. Especially at the beginning of the trial, systems were very error-prone. Fortunately, we, or the company, solved most problems before the patients took the systems home. Nevertheless, 10 of 15 families contacted us at least once because of technical problems.

Conclusions

Despite that the YouGrabber® is a promising and highly accepted training tool for home-use, currently, it is still error-prone, and the requested support exceeds the support that can be provided by clinical therapists. A technically more robust system, combined with additional attractive games, likely results in higher patient motivation and better compliance. This would reduce the need for parents to motivate their children extrinsically and allow for clinical trials to investigate the effectiveness of the system.

Keywords

Data glove, Pediatrics ,Neurorehabilitation, Upper extremities ,YouGrabber, Tele-rehabilitation, Game-based, Cerebral palsy, Children and adolescents, Clinical utility, User satisfaction

Continue —>  Preparing a neuropediatric upper limb exergame rehabilitation system for home-use: a feasibility study | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation | Full Text

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