Posts Tagged games

[Abstract+References] A Serious Games Platform for Cognitive Rehabilitation with Preliminary Evaluation

Abstract

In recent years Serious Games have evolved substantially, solving problems in diverse areas. In particular, in Cognitive Rehabilitation, Serious Games assume a relevant role. Traditional cognitive therapies are often considered repetitive and discouraging for patients and Serious Games can be used to create more dynamic rehabilitation processes, holding patients’ attention throughout the process and motivating them during their road to recovery. This paper reviews Serious Games and user interfaces in rehabilitation area and details a Serious Games platform for Cognitive Rehabilitation that includes a set of features such as: natural and multimodal user interfaces and social features (competition, collaboration, and handicapping) which can contribute to augment the motivation of patients during the rehabilitation process. The web platform was tested with healthy subjects. Results of this preliminary evaluation show the motivation and the interest of the participants by playing the games.

Source: A Serious Games Platform for Cognitive Rehabilitation with Preliminary Evaluation | SpringerLink

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Gamification in Physical Therapy: More Than Using Games

Abstract

The implementation of computer games in physical therapy is motivated by characteristics such as attractiveness, motivation, and engagement, but these do not guarantee the intended therapeutic effect of the interventions. Yet, these characteristics are important variables in physical therapy interventions because they involve reward-related dopaminergic systems in the brain that are known to facilitate learning through long-term potentiation of neural connections. In this perspective we propose a way to apply game design approaches to therapy development by “designing” therapy sessions in such a way as to trigger physical and cognitive behavioral patterns required for treatment and neurological recovery. We also advocate that improving game knowledge among therapists and improving communication between therapists and game designers may lead to a novel avenue in designing applied games with specific therapeutic input, thereby making gamification in therapy a realistic and promising future that may optimize clinical practice.

Source: Gamification in Physical Therapy: More Than Using Games : Pediatric Physical Therapy

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Gaming-based virtual reality therapy for the rehabilitation of upper extremity function after stroke.

Abstract

Objective To investigate the effects of playing virtual reality games on the recovery of hemiplegic upper extremities after stroke.

Methods Thirty stroke patients with hemiplegic upper extremities were randomly assigned to a treatment group (n=15) or a control group (n=15).Both groups received routine medication and conventional physical therapy,while the treatment group was additionally given (Nintendo) gaming-based virtual reality therapy.Before and after 2 weeks of treatment,the patients in both groups were evaluated using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for the Upper Extremities (FMA-UE),Brunnstrom staging and co-contraction ratios (CRs).Surface electromyogram signals from the biceps brachii and triceps brachii were also recorded during maximum isometric voluntary flexion and extension of the affected elbow.

Results No significant differences in any of the measurements were observed between the 2 groups before or after the intervention.Both groups demonstrated significant increases in their average FMA-UE score,Brunnstrom staging and CRs.

Conclusions Virtual reality gaming using a Wii controller is as effective as conventional therapy in enhancing upper extremity motor function and elbow flexion and extension after stroke.

Source: Gaming-based virtual reality therapy for the rehabilitation of upper extremity function after stroke | BVS Violência e Saúde

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] RAPAEL Smart Glove Receives CES 2017 Innovation Award – Rehab Managment

The RAPAEL Smart Glove, a wearable device from NEOFECT, Burlingame, Calif, offers at-home game-based hand therapy for stroke patients who cannot visit a clinic due to economic or geographic reasons.

Simply wear the glove, connect to the “RAPAEL” app, and play the rehabilitation games.

The Smart Glove—a CES 2017 Innovation Awards Honoree for the hospital edition—leads the patient through games that stimulate daily activities, in one or two 30-minute sessions per day.

Built-in sensors capture the patient’s movement and positioning data, and transfer it via Bluetooth to a tablet, where it is analyzed. This analysis enables the games’ difficulty levels to be adjusted and the patient’s exercise schedule to be customized.

Training movements include forearm supination/pronation, wrist flexion/extension, wrist radial/ulnar deviation, and finger flexion/extension, per the company’s website.

[Source: NEOFECT]

Source: RAPAEL Smart Glove Receives CES 2017 Innovation Award – Rehab Managment

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] A portable and cost-effective upper extremity rehabilitation system for individuals with upper limb motor deficits

Abstract

Long-term rehabilitation opportunities are critical for millions of individuals with chronic upper limb motor deficits striving to improve their motor performance through self-managed rehabilitation programs. However, there is minimal professional support of rehabilitation across the lifespan. In this paper, we introduce an upper extremity rehabilitation system, the Quality of Movement Feedback-Oriented Measurement System (QM-FOrMS), by integrating cost-effective portable sensors and clinically verified motion quality analysis towards individuals with upper limb motor deficits. Specifically, QM-FOrMS is comprised of an eTextile pressure sensitive mat, named Smart Mat, a sensory can, named Smart Can, and a mobile device. A personalizable and adaptive upper limb rehabilitation program is developed, including both unilateral and bilateral functional activities which can be selected from a list or custom designed to further tailor the program to the individual. Quantitative evaluation of the motor performance from the QM-FOrMS is derived from fine-grained kinematic measurements. We ran a pilot study with three groups, including five baseline subjects (i.e., healthy young adults), six older adults and four individuals with movement impairment. The experimental results show that QM-FOrMS can provide the detailed feature during the unattended rehabilitation exercise, and proposed metrics can distinguish the evaluation results across group.

Source: A portable and cost-effective upper extremity rehabilitation system for individuals with upper limb motor deficits – IEEE Xplore Document

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[ARTICLE] Modeling Based on Computational Intelligence for Physiotherapeutic Rehabilitation Games – Full Text PDF

Abstract.

Over the last years, the use of computational environments, like serious games, has been one of the strategies to improve commitment and motivation of patients undergoing rehabilitation. Beyond providing motivation, these systems are able to simulate life activities and provide means to automatically monitor users interactions, assuring that the patient is performing the exercises correctly, thus allowing the user to perform the exercises without the need of constant monitoring by a health professional. The aim of this work is to develop a modeling for construction of serious games, whose interaction is given by gestures performed by hand and wrist. The model includes an automatic continuous evaluation of rehabilitation exercises executed by the patient and dynamic game balancing using computational intelligence methods.

 Full Text PDF

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[ARTICLE] Personalization of Gait Rehabilitation Games on a Pressure Sensitive Interactive LED Floor – Full Text PDF

Abstract

This paper describes the design and evaluation of a suite of movement-based games for gait rehabilitation with personalization based on gait characteristics. We used an eight by one meter pressure sensitive interactive LED floor. With the interactive games we attempted to steer different dimensions of people’s gait, increase motivation, provide an enjoying experience, and create an additional platform for gait rehabilitation by physical therapists. We performed several days of exploratory user tests with the created set of games, in total 56 patients and 30 therapists were involved. The set of games was positively received by therapists, who stated they could train a variety of targeted domains with it. Furthermore, many rehabilitants indicated they liked it more than normal training exercises. The possibilities for personalization and the variety of games allowed users with a wide variety of skills and limitations to train their gait, although not all rehabilitants could be offered an appropriate level of challenge. Nonetheless, we do believe one reason for the positive responses is that the games can be adapted to the rehabilitants’ gait characteristics with several settings in the games, and that a second reason seems to be that therapists can choose between games to target different aspects of rehabilitation suitable for the type of rehabilitant.

Full Text PDF

 

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[WEB SITE] Virtual Reality and Rehabilitation — A Perfect Match?

9.2.2016 Ville Lahtinen

This is a story about VR Rehab. The story started last September in Demola, when a team of six students from different fields came together to work on a project called “Rehabilitation Using Virtual Reality”. During the course of the next four months this team explored the possibilities that VR brings to the world of rehabilitation.

Our team consisted of two coders, one business specialist, two health professionals, and me, the UX design / branding guy. The device Vincit gave us, Samsung Gear VR, proved to be a really nice headset with one small drawback: it doesn’t offer any hand tracking possibilities. And as hand movements play a pretty big role in many rehabilitation exercises, this was a challenge. But we of course like challenges.

The first target group we started designing for were hemispatial neglect patients. Neglect is a complex neurophysiological condition in which patients fail to be aware of items to one side of space. The majority of neglect patients are old people with brain injuries, and this target group quickly turned out to be a bit too challenging for us, as virtual reality is so immersive and therefore maybe a bit frightening for many older people.

After some more research we came up with the idea of a balance training game. Balance problems are common and their rehabilitation doesn’t necessarily require awareness of hand positions. The basic idea of the game was quickly formed: the patients’ objective is to focus their gaze on moving objects and keep looking at them for a certain time period. In the first version of the game these objects are fish and the background is an underwater view.

Everything in the game is meant to be fully customizable for each patient separately, though because of time-related constraints our team didn’t have the resources to fully implement everything we planned. Also with the help of a 360 degree camera the background could in theory be changed to a view that is meaningful for the patient. So if the patient for example has to spend large amounts of time indoors, this way they could visit familiar places virtually.

catch the fish

We did some user testing with our game at Pirkanmaan Erikoiskuntoutus, and the feedback we got was really positive. With some more work the game will certainly be of use for many patients. For example added levels and awards would probably make the game even more interesting and motivating.

In the coming months the first “real” VR headsets, like the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, will be released to the consumer market. The possibilities they offer for rehabilitation purposes are much bigger, not just because of hand tracking, but also because of the added computational power. Therefore we put our thoughts in the future and also made a prototype for a platform, which would function as a collection of different games and experiences designed for rehabilitation use. This platform would store patient data so that all the progress could easily be tracked and monitored, and naturally it would work with every headset.

All in all we are pretty satisfied with the end result. Of course lots of things could have been made differently and more efficiently, but the goal was to explore the possibilities of VR, and that is what we did. Probably every team member also got new valuable experiences while working on this project. The victory of the Demola season we aimed for was frustratingly close, as we came second, but at least there were 25 teams behind us.

user testing

I’m convinced that virtual reality has lots of potential in making rehabilitation more fun and motivating. If you want to read more about the journey, please visit our blog.

Ville Lahtinen

Virtual Reality and Rehabilitation — A Perfect Match? – Ohjelmistotalo Vincit Oy

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation for Smart Assessment and Training – IEEE Xplore

Published in: Healthcare Informatics (ICHI), 2015 International Conference on

21-23 Oct. 2015

Abstract

In the last two decades, robot-aided rehabilitation has become widespread, particularly for upper limb movement rehabilitation. In this Doctoral Consortium I present a system for physical and cognitive rehabilitation that uses a combination of Serious Games to allow the monitoring and progress tracking of a person during physical therapy. The system records physical and cognitive states through the interaction with the advance robotic arm in order to assess the users hand-eye coordination, response interaction, working memory and concentration rates.

Source: IEEE Xplore Abstract (Abstract) – Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation for Smart Assessment and Training

 

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[ARTICLE] Monitoring of Upper Limb Rehabilitation and Recovery after Stroke: An Architecture for a Cloud-Based Therapy Platform

Abstract

Amongst the therapies available to stroke sufferers, one that is gaining attention is the application of video games to encourage therapeutic movement. The Limbs Alive project at Newcastle University has developed a system that gathers therapeutic game data from patients, uses statistical tools to estimate a number of performance metrics and presents the results to patients and clinicians via web applications. This paper describes the architecture of this system and outlines the various technical challenges that were overcome, including in security and deployment.

Source: IEEE Xplore Abstract (Abstract) – Monitoring of Upper Limb Rehabilitation and Recovery after Stroke: An Architecture for a Cloud-Based…

 

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: