Posts Tagged Gears

[Abstract] Desktop upper limb rehabilitation robot using omnidirectional drive gear – IEEE Conference Publication

Abstract

Research and development efforts into small upper limb rehabilitation robots for home-based rehabilitation have been made in order to reduce the patient burden associated with making visits to the hospital. However, currently, there are only a few small upper limb rehabilitation robots capable of providing training that is tailored to account for the differences in individual patients. This is because many robots use omni wheels for their movement mechanism, thus causing problems when measuring patient motor function because it is not possible to accurately estimate the position. To solve this problem, in this study, we propose a new small upper limb rehabilitation robot that switches the driving unit from an omni wheel to an omnidirectional drive gear mechanism, as a mechanism that does not cause slips. Although an omnidirectional drive gear poses problems in terms of machining difficulty and weight, these problems can be solved by using a 3D printer. We show that position errors in small upper limb rehabilitation robots are greatly reduced by introducing a gear mechanism.

via Desktop upper limb rehabilitation robot using omnidirectional drive gear – IEEE Conference Publication

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract] The eWrist — A wearable wrist exoskeleton with sEMG-based force control for stroke rehabilitation.

Abstract:

Chronic wrist impairment is frequent following stroke and negatively impacts everyday life. Rehabilitation of the dysfunctional limb is possible but requires extensive training and motivation. Wearable training devices might offer new opportunities for rehabilitation. However, few devices are available to train wrist extension even though this movement is highly relevant for many upper limb activities of daily living. As a proof of concept, we developed the eWrist, a wearable one degree-of-freedom powered exoskeleton which supports wrist extension training. Conceptually one might think of an electric bike which provides mechanical support only when the rider moves the pedals, i.e. it enhances motor activity but does not replace it. Stroke patients may not have the ability to produce overt movements, but they might still be able to produce weak muscle activation that can be measured via surface electromyography (sEMG). By combining force and sEMG-based control in an assist-as-needed support strategy, we aim at providing a training device which enhances activity of the wrist extensor muscles in the context of daily life activities, thereby, driving cortical reorganization and recovery. Preliminary results show that the integration of sEMG signals in the control strategy allow for adjustable assistance with respect to a proxy measurement of corticomotor drive.

Source: The eWrist — A wearable wrist exoskeleton with sEMG-based force control for stroke rehabilitation – IEEE Xplore Document

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: