Posts Tagged Hemiparetic

[Abstract] The effect of a wrist-hand stretching device for spasticity in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. – Europe PubMed Central

Abstract

The majority of these stretching devices have focused on spasticity of the leg and only a few devices have been developed for spasticity of the wrist and hand. In addition, most of these devices were large and complicated, with less easy applicability for personal use.

To investigate the effect of a stretching device for spasticity of the wrist and hand in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients.Prospective single blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

Outpatients.Patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention group(11 patients) or the control group(10 patients). The stretching device consisted of a circular shaped plastic plate and five holders to immobilize the fingers. In position 1, finger tips were facing forward, position 2 was 90° external rotation from position 1, and position 3 was 90° external rotation from position 2. Each position was maintained for 4 minutes and a rest period of 1 minute was given, therefore, one session was performed for 14 minutes. The stretching program was conducted 3 sessions/day, 6 days/week for 4 weeks. Spasticity(modified Ashworth scale [MAS]) and motor function(Fugl-Meyer motor assessment [FMA], Active Range of Motion [AROM]) of affected wrist and hand were assessed three times(first assessment; Pre, second assessment; Post-2 weeks, third assessment; Post-4 weeks).

In the intervention group, significant differences in the wrist and hand MAS and FMA were observed between three assessment times(p<0.05). However, no significant differences in the wrist and hand AROM were observed between three assessment times(p>0.05). In the control group, no differences in MAS, FMA, and AROM were observed between three assessment times(p>0.05).Findings showed that this stretching device was effective in terms of relieving spasticity and functional recovery.This stretching device is effective in spasticity reducing and motor function improvement. Moreover, it is useful to patient because it is easy to use and portable.

Source: The effect of a wrist-hand stretching device for spasticity in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. – Abstract – Europe PubMed Central

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[ARTICLE] Effectiveness of Virtual Reality Game on Functional Movement and Activities of Daily Living in Hemiparetic Stroke Patients.

Abstract:

Independent activities of daily living (ADLs) performance are recognized as a major goal of stroke rehabilitation. Recently, virtual reality training using a video game is considered as an effective approach to improve functional activity of stroke patients.

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of virtual reality game using a wii fit balance board on functional movement and ADLs of hemiparetic stroke patients.

20 subjects were randomly allocated into two groups: the virtual reality game training (n = 10) and control groups (n = 10). Both groups participated in standard rehabilitation program for 6 weeks. In addition, virtual reality game training group participated in virtual reality game training for 30 minutes per day, 3 times a week, for 6 weeks.

Virtual reality game training program consisted of balance bubble, ski slalom, ski jump, soccer heading, table tiling, and the penguin slide was conducted with the Wii-Fit balance board. After 6 weeks virtual reality game training, significant improvement observed in functional movement and ADL performance in the virtual reality game training group compared to the control group.

Findings of this study demonstrated that the virtual reality game training has an effective on functional movement and ADL performance in hemiparetic stroke patients when added to standard rehabilitation.

Source: Effectiveness of Virtual Reality Game on Functional Movement and …: ingentaconnect

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[ARTICLE] Upper limb immobilisation: A neural plasticity model with relevance to post-stroke motor rehabilitation – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Advances in our knowledge about the neural plasticity that occurs after hemiparetic stroke have contributed to the formulation of theories of post-stroke motor recovery. Such theories, in turn, have underpinned contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies for treating motor deficits after stroke, such as upper limb hemiparesis.

However, a relative drawback has been that, in general, these strategies are most compatible to the recovery profiles of high-functioning stroke survivors, and therefore they do not easily translate into benefit to those individuals sustaining low-functioning upper limb hemiparesis, who otherwise have poorer residual function. For these individuals, alternative motor rehabilitation strategies are needed.

In this article, we will review upper limb immobilisation studies that have been conducted with adult healthy humans and animals. Then, we will discuss how the findings from these studies could inspire the creation of a neural plasticity model that is likely to be of particular relevance to the context of motor rehabilitation after stroke. For instance, as will be elaborated, such model could contribute to the development of alternative motor rehabilitation strategies for treating post-stroke upper limb hemiparesis.

The implications of the findings from those immobilisation studies for contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies will also be discussed and perspectives for future research in this arena will be provided as well.

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[ARTICLE] Upper limb immobilisation: A neural plasticity model with relevance to post-stroke motor rehabilitation – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Advances in our knowledge about the neural plasticity that occurs after hemiparetic stroke have contributed to the formulation of theories of post-stroke motor recovery. Such theories, in turn, have underpinned contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies for treating motor deficits after stroke, such as upper limb hemiparesis. However, a relative drawback has been that, in general, these strategies are most compatible to the recovery profiles of high-functioning stroke survivors, and therefore they do not easily translate into benefit to those individuals sustaining low-functioning upper limb hemiparesis, who otherwise have poorer residual function. For these individuals, alternative motor rehabilitation strategies are needed. In this article, we will review upper limb immobilisation studies that have been conducted with adult healthy humans and animals. Then, we will discuss how the findings from these studies could inspire the creation of a neural plasticity model that is likely to be of particular relevance to the context of motor rehabilitation after stroke. For instance, as will be elaborated, such model could contribute to the development of alternative motor rehabilitation strategies for treating post-stroke upper limb hemiparesis. The implications of the findings from those immobilisation studies for contemporary motor rehabilitation strategies will also be discussed and perspectives for future research in this arena will be provided as well.

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[ARTICLE] Home-based Neurologic Music Therapy for Upper Limb Rehabilitation with Stroke Patients at Community Rehabilitation Stage – a Feasibility Study Protocol.

Background: Impairment of upper limb function following stroke is more common than lower limb impairment and is also more resistant to treatment. Several lab-based studies with stroke patients have produced statistically significant gains in upper limb function when using musical instrument playing and techniques where rhythm acts as an external time-keeper for the priming and timing of upper limb movements.

Methods: For this feasibility study a small sample size of 14 participants (3 – 60 months post stroke) has been determined through clinical discussion between the researcher and study host in order to test for management, feasibility and effects, before planning a larger trial determined through power analysis. A cross-over design with five repeated measures will be used, whereby participants will be randomized into either a treatment (n=7) or wait list control (n=7) group. Intervention will take place twice weekly over 6 weeks. The ARAT and 9HPT will be used to measure for quantitative gains in arm function and finger dexterity, pre/post treatment interviews will serve to investigate treatment compliance and tolerance. A lab based EEG case comparison study will be undertaken to explore audio-motor coupling, brain connectivity and neural reorganization with this intervention, as evidenced in similar studies.

Discussion: Before evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based intervention in a larger scale study, it is important to assess whether implementation of the trial methodology is feasible. This study investigates the feasibility, efficacy and patient experience of a music therapy treatment protocol comprising a chart of 12 different instrumental exercises and variations, which aims at promoting measurable changes in upper limb function in hemiparetic stroke patients. The study proposes to examine several new aspects including home-based treatment and dosage, and will provide data on recruitment, adherence and variability of outcomes.

Source: Frontiers | Home-based Neurologic Music Therapy for Upper Limb Rehabilitation with Stroke Patients at Community Rehabilitation Stage – a Feasibility Study Protocol. | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

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[ARTICLE] Use of visual feedback for balance training in hemiparetic Stroke patients – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Introduction: Hemiparetic Stroke patients have their daily activities affected by the balance impairment. Techniques that used visual information for training this impairment it seems to be effective.

Objective: To analyze the effects of the unstable balance board training and compare two ways of visual feedback: the biomechanical instrumentation and the mirror.

Materials and methods: Eight chronic hemiparetic Stroke patients participated in the research, randomized in two groups. The first group (G1) accomplished the training with biomechanical instrumentation, and the second group (G2) trained in front of the mirror. Sixteen training sessions were done with feet together, and feet apart. The evaluation instruments that were used before and after the period of training were the Time Up and Go Test (TUGT), Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Instrumented Balance Board (IBB), that quantified the functional mobility, the balance and the posture control respectively.

Results: The TUGT showed significant results (p < 0.05) favorable to G1. Despite the results of BBS were significant for G2, the intergroup comparison did not reveal statistical significance. Both groups obtained decrease in levels of IBB oscillation, what can indicate a higher stability, however the results did not indicate statistical significance (p > 0.05). A strong correlation between all the applied tests was observed in this research.

Conclusion: Although the advantages found were different between the groups, in both it could be observed that the training brought benefits, with the transference to the functional mobility.

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[ARTICLE] Abobotulinumtoxina (Dysport®): Doses Used to Treat Upper Limb Muscles of Adults with Spasticity Participating in a Phase III Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo- Controlled Study

Abstract

Introduction/Background: In a Phase III, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study conducted in 34 sites from 9 countries, two doses of abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport®) 500 and 1000 units (U) were shown to be efficacious on muscle tone for the treatment of hemiparetic adults post stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a favourable safety profile.1.

Materials and Methods: 243 patients received abobotulinumtoxinA 500 or 1000 U or placebo by intramuscular injection into their primary targeted muscle group (PTMG, selected from extrinsic finger flexors, wrist flexors and elbow flexors) and at least two other upper limb muscles, including shoulder muscles. Treatment was administered in a volume of 5.0 mL using electrostimulation. Doses administered to upper limb muscles are reported here.

Results: For the abobotulinumtoxinA 500 U group, mean (SD) doses (U) administered in fingers flexors were: 93.5 (17.0) for flexor digitorium profundus (FDP), 95.4 (14.3) for flexor digitorium superficialis (FDS) and 76.9 (26.8) for other finger flexors (flexor pollis longus, adductor pollicis); in wrist flexors: 92.2 (18.1) for flexor carpi radialis (FCR) and 89.9 (25.7) for flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU); in elbow flexors: 88.3 (28.5) for brachioradialis, 148.5 (60.2) for brachialis and 108.6 (49.5) for other elbow muscles (biceps brachii, pronator teres) and 122.2 (44.1) in shoulder muscles (triceps brachii, pectoralis major, subscapularis, latissimus dorsi). For the abobotulinumtoxinA 1000 U group, doses administered were 195.5 (25.9) for FDP, 196.8 (28.4) for FDS, 157.0 (53.3) for other finger flexors, 178.1 (45.5) for FCR, 171.2 (45.2) for FCU, 172.1 (44.8) for brachioradialis, 321.4 (103.2) for brachialis, 216.5 (92.2) for other elbow muscles and 300.0 (129.1) in shoulder muscles.

Conclusion: In this Phase III worldwide study in hemiparetic patients with upper limb spasticity post stroke/TBI, mean doses administered were 76.9–196.8 U for muscles in the finger flexors, 89.9-178.1 U for muscles in wrist flexors, 88.3–321.4 U for muscles in the elbow flexors and 122.2–300.0 U in shoulder muscles. Total dose administered (in the PTMG and at least 2 upper limb muscles) was 500 or 1000 U, which was previously shown to improve muscle tone in this patient population.

via DIAL : Abobotulinumtoxina (Dysport®): Doses Used to Treat Upper Limb Muscles of Adults with Spasticity Participating in a Phase III Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo- Controlled Study.

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[ARTICLE] The effect of a wrist-hand stretching device for spasticity in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The majority of these stretching devices have focused on spasticity of the leg and only a few devices have been developed for spasticity of the wrist and hand. In addition, most of these devices were large and complicated, with less easy applicability for personal use.

AIM: To investigate the effect of a stretching device for spasticity of the wrist and hand in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients.

DESIGN: Prospective single blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

SETTING: Outpatients.

METHODS: Patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention group(11 patients) or the control group(10 patients). The stretching device consisted of a circular shaped plastic plate and five holders to immobilize the fingers. In position 1, finger tips were facing forward, position 2 was 90° external rotation from position 1, and position 3 was 90° external rotation from position 2. Each position was maintained for 4 minutes and a rest period of 1 minute was given, therefore, one session was performed for 14 minutes. The stretching program was conducted 3 sessions/day, 6 days/week for 4 weeks. Spasticity(modified Ashworth scale [MAS]) and motor function(Fugl-Meyer motor assessment [FMA], Active Range of Motion [AROM]) of affected wrist and hand were assessed three times(first assessment; Pre, second assessment; Post-2 weeks, third assessment; Post-4 weeks).

RESULTS: In the intervention group, significant differences in the wrist and hand MAS and FMA were observed between three assessment times(p0.05). In the control group, no differences in MAS, FMA, and AROM were observed between three assessment times(p>0.05).

CONCLUSION: Findings showed that this stretching device was effective in terms of relieving spasticity and functional recovery.

CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: This stretching device is effective in spasticity reducing and motor function improvement. Moreover, it is useful to patient because it is easy to use and portable.

via The effect of a wrist-hand stretching device for spasticity in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. – Abstract – Europe PubMed Central.

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[ARTICLE] Virtual rehabilitation via Nintendo Wii® and conventional physical therapy effectively treat post-stroke hemiparetic patients

Abstract

Background: The Nintendo® Wii is a simple and affordable virtual therapy alternative. It may be used at home, and it is a motivating recreational activity that provides continuous feedback. However, studies comparing the use of the Nintendo® Wii to conventional physical therapy are needed.

Objective: To compare the effect of a rehabilitation treatment using the Nintendo® Wii (NW) with conventional physical therapy (CPT) to improve the sensorimotor function and quality of life for post-stroke hemiparetic patients.

Methods: The present study applied a randomized, blind, and controlled clinical trial. In total, 30 patients with post-stroke hemiparesis were evaluated. A total of 15 patients were randomly assigned to each group. The SF-36 quality of life and Fugl–Meyer scales were used to evaluate the patients.

Results: After treatment, the only variable that differed between the groups was the physical functioning domain of the SF-36 in the group that received conventional physical therapy. A significant difference was observed between both groups before and after treatment in terms of the following Fugl–Meyer scale items: passive movement and pain, motor function of the upper limbs (ULs), and balance. The CPT group also showed a significant difference with regard to their UL and lower limb (LL) coordination. The SF-36 scale analysis revealed a significant difference within both groups with regard to the following domains: physical functioning, role limitation due to physical aspects, vitality, and role limitation due to emotional aspects. The NW group also exhibited a significant difference in the mental health domain. The results indicate that both approaches improved the patients’ performance in a similar manner.

Conclusion: Virtual rehabilitation using the Nintendo Wii® and CPT both effectively treat post-stroke hemiparetic patients by improving passive movement and pain scores, motor function of the upper limb, balance, physical functioning, vitality, and the physical and emotional aspects of role functioning.

via Virtual rehabilitation via Nintendo Wii® and conventional physical therapy effectively treat post-stroke hemiparetic patients: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation: Vol 0, No 0.

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