Posts Tagged hemiplegia

[Abstract] Stepping training with external feedback relating to lower limb support ability effectively improved complex motor activity in ambulatory patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial

 

BACKGROUND: Lower limb support ability is important for steady and efficient mobility, but previous data commonly involved training during double stance positions, with or without external feedback, using a complex and costly machine.
AIM: To compare the effects of stepping training with or without external feedback in relation to the lower limb support ability of the affected limb on the functional ability necessary for independence in individuals with stroke.
DESIGN: A single-blinded, randomised controlled trial.
SETTING: Tertiary rehabilitation centres.
POPULATION: Ambulatory participants with stroke who walked independently over at least 10 meters with or without walking devices.
METHODS: Thirty-six participants were randomly arranged to be involved in a program of stepping training with or without external feedback related to the lower limb support ability of the affected limb (18 participants/group) for 30 minutes, followed by overground walking training for 10 minutes, 5 days/week over 4 weeks. The outcomes, including the lower limb support ability of the affected legs during stepping, functional ability and spatial walking data, were assessed prior to training, immediately after the first training session, and after 2- and 4- week training.
RESULTS: Participants demonstrated significant improvement in the amount of lower limb support ability, immediately after the first training with external feedback. Then, these participants showed further improvement in both the amount and duration of lower limb support ability, as well as the timed up and go data after 2 and 4 weeks of training (p < 0.05). This improvement was not found following control training.
CONCLUSIONS: The external feedback relating to lower limb support ability during stepping training effectively improved the movement stability and complex motor activity of ambulatory individuals with stroke who had long post-stroke time (approximately 3 years).
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Stepping training protocols and feedback can be easily applied in various settings using the amount of body-weight from an upright digital bathroom scale. Thus, the findings offer an alternative rehabilitation strategy for clinical, community and home-based settings for stroke individuals.

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via Stepping training with external feedback relating to lower limb support ability effectively improved complex motor activity in ambulatory patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2019 Oct 15 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[Abstract] Effects of Bihemispheric Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A randomized Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study

Abstract

Background and Purpose

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a treatment used in the rehabilitation of stroke patients aiming to improve functionality of the plegic upper extremity. Currently, tDCS is not routinely used in post stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of bihemspheric tDCS combined with physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) on upper extremity motor function.

Methods

Thirty-two stroke inpatients were randomised into 2 groups. All patients received 15 sessions of conventional upper extremity PT and OT over 3 weeks. The tDCS group (n = 16) also received 30 minutes of bihemispheric tDCS and the sham group (n = 16) 30 minutes of sham bihemispheric tDCS simultaneously to OT. Patients were evaluated before and after treatment using the Fugl Meyer upper extremity (FMUE), functional independence measure (FIM), and Brunnstrom stages of stroke recovery (BSSR) by a physiatrist blind to the treatment group

Results

The improvement in FIM was higher in the tDCS group compared to the sham group (P = .001). There was a significant within group improvement in FMUE, FIM and BSSR in those receiving tDCS (P = .001). There was a significant improvement in FIM in the chronic (> 6months) stroke sufferers who received tDCS when compared to those who received sham tDCS and when compared to subacute stroke (3-6 months) sufferers who received tDCS/sham.

Conclusions

Upper extremity motor function in hemiplegic stroke patients improves when bihemispheric tDCS is used alongside conventional PT and OT. The improvement in functionality is greater in chronic stroke patients.

via Effects of Bihemispheric Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A randomized Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study – ScienceDirect

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[Abstract] Effects of kinesio taping on hemiplegic hand in patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity: a randomized controlled pilot study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Post-stroke spasticity is a common complication in patients with stroke and a key contributor to impaired hand function after stroke.
AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of kinesio taping on managing spasticity of upper extremity and motor performance in patients with subacute stroke.
DESIGN: A randomized controlled pilot study.
SETTING: A hospital center.
POPULATION: Participants with stroke within six months.
METHODS: Thirty-one participants were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated into kinesio taping (KT) group or control group. In KT group, Kinesio Tape was applied as an add-on treatment over the dorsal side of the affected hand during the intervention. Both groups received regular rehabilitation 5 days a week for 3 weeks. The primary outcome was muscle spasticity measured by modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Secondary outcomes were functional performances of affected limb measured by using Fugl-Meyer assessment for upper extremity (FMA-UE), Brunnstrom stage, and the Simple Test for Evaluating Hand Function (STEF). Measures were taken before intervention, right after intervention (the third week) and two weeks later (the fifth week).
RESULTS: Within-group comparisons yielded significant differences in FMA-UE and Brunnstrom stages at the third and fifth week in the control group (P=0.003-0.019). In the KT group, significant differences were noted in FMA-UE, Brunnstrom stage, and MAS at the third and fifth week (P=0.001-0.035), and in the proximal part of FMA-UE between the third and fifth week (P=0.005). Between-group comparisons showed a significant difference in the distal part of FMA-UE at the fifth week (P=0.037).
CONCLUSIONS: Kinesio taping could provide some benefits in reducing spasticity and in improving motor performance on the affected hand in patients with subacute stroke.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Kinesio taping could be a choice for clinical practitioners to use for effectively managing post-stroke spasticity.

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via Effects of kinesio taping on hemiplegic hand in patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity: a randomized controlled pilot study – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2019 October;55(5):551-7 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[Abstract] A novel backstepping adaptive impedance control for an upper limb rehabilitation robot

Abstract

Stroke contributes to hemiplegia, which severely reduces people’s ability to perform activities of daily living. Due to the insufficiency of medical resources, there is an urgent need for home-based rehabilitation robot. In this paper, we design a home-based upper limb rehabilitation robot, based on the principle that three axes intersect at one point. A three-dimensional force sensor is equipped at the end of the manipulator to measure the interaction forces between the affected upper limb and the robot during rehabilitation training. The virtual rehabilitation training environment is designed to improve the enthusiasm of patients. A backstepping adaptive fuzzy based impedance control method is proposed for the home-based upper limb rehabilitation robot to prevent secondary injury of the affected limb. The adaptive law is introduced, and the backstepping adaptive fuzzy based impedance controller is proved in details. Experiments results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

 

via A novel backstepping adaptive impedance control for an upper limb rehabilitation robot – ScienceDirect

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[Abstract] Bilateral Contralaterally Controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation Reveals New Insights Into the Interhemispheric Competition Model in Chronic Stroke

Background. Upper-limb chronic stroke hemiplegia was once thought to persist because of disproportionate amounts of inhibition imposed from the contralesional on the ipsilesional hemisphere. Thus, one rehabilitation strategy involves discouraging engagement of the contralesional hemisphere by only engaging the impaired upper limb with intensive unilateral activities. However, this premise has recently been debated and has been shown to be task specific and/or apply only to a subset of the stroke population. Bilateral rehabilitation, conversely, engages both hemispheres and has been shown to benefit motor recovery. To determine what neurophysiological strategies bilateral therapies may engage, we compared the effects of a bilateral and unilateral based therapy using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

Methods. We adopted a peripheral electrical stimulation paradigm where participants received 1 session of bilateral contralaterally controlled functional electrical stimulation (CCFES) and 1 session of unilateral cyclic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (cNMES) in a repeated-measures design. In all, 15 chronic stroke participants with a wide range of motor impairments (upper extremity Fugl-Meyer score: 15 [severe] to 63 [mild]) underwent single 1-hour sessions of CCFES and cNMES. We measured whether CCFES and cNMES produced different effects on interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) to the ipsilesional hemisphere, ipsilesional corticospinal output, and ipsilateral corticospinal output originating from the contralesional hemisphere.

Results. CCFES reduced IHI and maintained ipsilesional output when compared with cNMES. We found no effect on ipsilateral output for either condition. Finally, the less-impaired participants demonstrated a greater increase in ipsilesional output following CCFES.

Conclusions. Our results suggest that bilateral therapies are capable of alleviating inhibition on the ipsilesional hemisphere and enhancing output to the paretic limb.

 

via Bilateral Contralaterally Controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation Reveals New Insights Into the Interhemispheric Competition Model in Chronic Stroke – David A. Cunningham, Jayme S. Knutson, Vishwanath Sankarasubramanian, Kelsey A. Potter-Baker, Andre G. Machado, Ela B. Plow, 2019

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[Abstract] Bilateral Contralaterally Controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation Reveals New Insights Into the Interhemispheric Competition Model in Chronic Stroke

Background. Upper-limb chronic stroke hemiplegia was once thought to persist because of disproportionate amounts of inhibition imposed from the contralesional on the ipsilesional hemisphere. Thus, one rehabilitation strategy involves discouraging engagement of the contralesional hemisphere by only engaging the impaired upper limb with intensive unilateral activities. However, this premise has recently been debated and has been shown to be task specific and/or apply only to a subset of the stroke population. Bilateral rehabilitation, conversely, engages both hemispheres and has been shown to benefit motor recovery. To determine what neurophysiological strategies bilateral therapies may engage, we compared the effects of a bilateral and unilateral based therapy using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

Methods. We adopted a peripheral electrical stimulation paradigm where participants received 1 session of bilateral contralaterally controlled functional electrical stimulation (CCFES) and 1 session of unilateral cyclic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (cNMES) in a repeated-measures design. In all, 15 chronic stroke participants with a wide range of motor impairments (upper extremity Fugl-Meyer score: 15 [severe] to 63 [mild]) underwent single 1-hour sessions of CCFES and cNMES. We measured whether CCFES and cNMES produced different effects on interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) to the ipsilesional hemisphere, ipsilesional corticospinal output, and ipsilateral corticospinal output originating from the contralesional hemisphere.

Results. CCFES reduced IHI and maintained ipsilesional output when compared with cNMES. We found no effect on ipsilateral output for either condition. Finally, the less-impaired participants demonstrated a greater increase in ipsilesional output following CCFES.

Conclusions. Our results suggest that bilateral therapies are capable of alleviating inhibition on the ipsilesional hemisphere and enhancing output to the paretic limb.

via Bilateral Contralaterally Controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation Reveals New Insights Into the Interhemispheric Competition Model in Chronic Stroke – David A. Cunningham, Jayme S. Knutson, Vishwanath Sankarasubramanian, Kelsey A. Potter-Baker, Andre G. Machado, Ela B. Plow,

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[Abstract] Effects of kinesiotaping on hemiplegic hand in patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity: a randomized controlled pilot study

BACKGROUND: Post-stroke spasticity is a common complication in patients with stroke and a key contributor to impaired hand function after stroke.
AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Kinesiotaping on managing spasticity of upper extremity and motor performance in patients with subacute stroke.
DESIGN: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.
SETTING: One hospital center.
POPULATION: Participants with stroke within six months.
METHODS: Thirty-one participants were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated into Kinesiotaping (KT) group or control group. In KT group, Kinesio tape was applied as an add- on treatment over the dorsal side of the affected hand during the intervention. Both groups received regular rehabilitation 5 days a week for 3 weeks. The primary outcome was muscle spasticity measured by modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). Secondary outcomes were functional performances of affected limb measured by using Fugl-Meyer assessment for upper extremity (FMA-UE), Brunnstrom stage, and the Simple Test for Evaluating Hand Function (STEF). Measures were taken before intervention, right after intervention (the third week) and two weeks later (the fifth week).
RESULTS: Within-group comparisons yielded significant differences in FMA-UE and Brunnstrom stages at the third and fifth week in the control group (p=0.003-0.019). In the KT group, significant differences were noted in FMA-UE, Brunnstrom stage, and MAS at the third and fifth week (p=0.001-0.035), and in the proximal part of FMA-UE between the third and fifth week (p=0.005). Between-group comparisons showed a significant difference in the distal part of FMA-UE at the fifth week (p=0.037).
CONCLUSIONS: Kinesiotaping could provide some benefits in reducing spasticity and in improving motor performance on the affected hand in patients with subacute stroke.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Kinesiotaping could be a choice for clinical practitioners to use for effectively managing post-stroke spasticity.

via Effects of kinesiotaping on hemiplegic hand in patients with upper limb post-stroke spasticity: a randomized controlled pilot study – European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2019 Jun 13 – Minerva Medica – Journals

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[Abstract] Pre-therapeutic Device for Post-stroke Hemiplegic Patients’ Wrist and Finger Rehabilitation

Abstract

Background/Objectives

This paper suggests a pre-therapeutic device for post-stroke hemiplegic patients’ wrist and finger rehabilitation both to decrease and analyze their muscle tones before the main physical or occupational therapy.

Method/Statistical Analysis

We designed a robot which consists of a BLDC motor, a torque sensor, linear motion guides and bearings. Mechanical structure of the robot induces flexion and extension of wrist and finger (MCP) joints simultaneously with the single motor. The frames of the robot were 3D printed. During the flexion/extension exercise, angular position and repulsive torque of the joints are measured and displayed in real time.

Findings

A prototype was 3D printed to conduct preliminary experiment on normal subject. From the neutral joint position (midway between extension and flexion), the robot rotated 120 degrees to extension direction and 30 degrees to flexion direction. First, the subject used the machine with the usual wrist and finger characteristics without any tones. Second, the same subject intentionally gave strength to the joints in order to imitate affected upper limb of a hemiplegic patient. During extension exercise, maximum repulsive torque of the normal hand was 2 Nm whereas that of the firm hand was almost 5 Nm. The result revealed that the device was capable enough to not only rotate rigid wrist and fingers with the novel robotic structure, but also present quantitative data such as the repulsive torque according to the joint orientation as an index of joint spasticity level.

Improvements/Applications

We are planning to improve the system by applying torque control and arranging experiments at hospitals to obtain patients’ data and feedbacks to meet actual needs in the field.

via Indian Journals

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[Abstract] Brain-machine interface of upper limb recovery in stroke patients rehabilitation: A systematic review

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Technologies such as brain-computer interfaces are able to guide mental practice, in particular motor imagery performance, to promote recovery in stroke patients, as a combined approach to conventional therapy.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this systematic review was to provide a status report regarding advances in brain-computer interface, focusing in particular in upper limb motor recovery.

METHODS:

The databases PubMed, Scopus, and PEDro were systematically searched for articles published between January 2010 and December 2017. The selected studies were randomized controlled trials involving brain-computer interface interventions in stroke patients, with upper limb assessment as primary outcome measures. Reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the trials, using the PEDro methodologic rating scale.

RESULTS:

From 309 titles, we included nine studies with high quality (PEDro ≥ 6). We found that the most common interface used was non-invasive electroencephalography, and the main neurofeedback, in stroke rehabilitation, was usually visual abstract or a combination with the control of an orthosis/robotic limb. Moreover, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale was a major outcome measure in eight out of nine studies. In addition, the benefits of functional electric stimulation associated to an interface were found in three studies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Neurofeedback training with brain-computer interface systems seem to promote clinical and neurophysiologic changes in stroke patients, in particular those with long-term efficacy.

via: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30609208

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[Abstract] Virtual Reality in Upper Extremity Rehabilitation of Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Virtual reality game system is one of novel approaches, which can improve hemiplegic extremity functions of stroke patients. We aimed to evaluate the effect of the Microsoft Xbox 360 Kinect video game system on upper limb motor functions for subacute stroke patients.

METHODS:

The study included 42 stroke patients of which 35 (19 Virtual reality group, 16 control group) completed the study. All patients received 60 minutes of conventional therapy for upper extremity, 5 times per-week for 4 weeks. Virtual reality group additionally received Xbox Kinect game system 30 minutes per-day. Patients were evaluated prior to the rehabilitation and at the end of 4 weeks. Box&Block Test, Functional independence measure self-care score, Brunnstorm stage and Fugl-Meyer upper extremity motor function scale were used as outcome measures.

RESULTS:

The Brunnstrom stages and the scores on the Fugl-Meyer upper extremity, Box&Block Test and Functional independence measure improved significantly from baseline to post-treatment in both the experimental and the control groups. The Brunnstrom stage-upper extremity and Box&Block Test gain for the experimental group were significantly higher compared to the control group, while the Brunnstrom stage-hand, the Functional independence measure gain and Fugl-Meyer gain were similar between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found evidence that kinect-based game system in addition to conventional therapy may have supplemental benefit for stroke patients. However, for virtual reality game systems to enter the routine practice of stroke rehabilitation, randomized controlled clinical trials with longer follow-up periods and larger sample sizes are needed especially to determine an optimal duration and intensity of the treatment.

via https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30193810

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