Posts Tagged hemiplegic

[Abstract] Gaming-based virtual reality therapy for the rehabilitation of upper extremity function after stroke.

Abstract

Objective To investigate the effects of playing virtual reality games on the recovery of hemiplegic upper extremities after stroke.

Methods Thirty stroke patients with hemiplegic upper extremities were randomly assigned to a treatment group (n=15) or a control group (n=15).Both groups received routine medication and conventional physical therapy,while the treatment group was additionally given (Nintendo) gaming-based virtual reality therapy.Before and after 2 weeks of treatment,the patients in both groups were evaluated using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for the Upper Extremities (FMA-UE),Brunnstrom staging and co-contraction ratios (CRs).Surface electromyogram signals from the biceps brachii and triceps brachii were also recorded during maximum isometric voluntary flexion and extension of the affected elbow.

Results No significant differences in any of the measurements were observed between the 2 groups before or after the intervention.Both groups demonstrated significant increases in their average FMA-UE score,Brunnstrom staging and CRs.

Conclusions Virtual reality gaming using a Wii controller is as effective as conventional therapy in enhancing upper extremity motor function and elbow flexion and extension after stroke.

Source: Gaming-based virtual reality therapy for the rehabilitation of upper extremity function after stroke | BVS Violência e Saúde

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[Abstract] Effectiveness of Bilateral Arm Training for Improving Extremity Function and Activities of Daily Living Performance in Hemiplegic Patients

Background

Bilateral movement therapy, which encourages simultaneous use of the limbs on both the affected and nonaffected sides, is known to help in motor function recovery in hemiplegic patients. However, studies on the effectiveness of bilateral arm training for improving upper limb function and activities of daily living (ADL) performance in hemiplegic stroke patients are lacking. The present study investigated the effectiveness of bilateral arm training for improving upper limb function and ADL performance in hemiplegic stroke patients.

Methods

The study included 30 hemiplegic stroke patients. The patients were randomly divided into an experimental group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 15). All patients received a uniform general occupational therapy session lasting 30 minutes 5 times a week for 8 weeks. The experimental group received an additional session of bilateral arm training lasting 30 minutes, and the control group received an additional session of general occupational therapy lasting 30 minutes. The Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), Box and Block Test (BBT), and modified Barthel index (MBI) were used for evaluation.

Results

In both the experimental and control groups, the FMA, BBT, and MBI scores were significantly higher after the intervention than before the intervention (P <.05). The changes in the FMA, BBT, and MBI scores were greater in the experimental group than in the control group (P <.05).

Conclusions

Bilateral arm training along with general occupational therapy might be more effective than occupational therapy alone for improving upper limb function and ADL performance in hemiplegic stroke patients.

Source: Effectiveness of Bilateral Arm Training for Improving Extremity Function and Activities of Daily Living Performance in Hemiplegic Patients – Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases

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[Abstract] Feasibility and efficacy of a robotic device for hand rehabilitation in hemiplegic stroke patients: A randomized pilot controlled study.

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of robot-assisted hand rehabilitation in improving arm function abilities in sub-acute hemiplegic patients.

Design: Randomized controlled pilot study.

Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation centers.

Participants: Thirty hemiplegic stroke patients (Ashworth spasticity index <3) were recruited and randomly divided into a Treatment group (TG) and Control group (CG).

Interventions: Patients in the TG received intensive hand training with Gloreha, a hand rehabilitation glove that provides computer-controlled, repetitive, passive mobilization of the fingers, with multisensory feedback. Patients in the CG received the same amount of time in terms of conventional hand rehabilitation.

Main outcome measures: Hand motor function (Motricity Index, MI), fine manual dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test, NHPT) and strength (Grip and Pinch test) were measured at baseline and after rehabilitation, and the differences, (Δ) mean(standard deviation), compared between groups.

Results Twenty-seven patients concluded the program: 14 in the TG and 13 in the CG. None of the patients refused the device and only one adverse event of rheumatoid arthritis reactivation was reported. Baseline data did not differ significantly between the two groups. In TG, ΔMI 23(16.4), ΔNHPT 0.16(0.16), ΔGRIP 0.27(0.23) and ΔPINCH 0.07(0.07) were significantly greater than in CG, ΔMI 5.2(9.2), ΔNHPT 0.02(0.07), ΔGRIP 0.03(0.06) and ΔPINCH 0.02(0.03)] (p=0.002, p=0.009, p=0.003and p=0.038, respectively).

Conclusions: Gloreha Professional is feasible and effective in recovering fine manual dexterity and strength and reducing arm disability in sub-acute hemiplegic patients.

Source: Feasibility and efficacy of a robotic device for hand rehabilitation in hemiplegic stroke patients: A randomized pilot controlled study

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[Systematic Review] Effectiveness of Mirror Therapy for Lower Extremity Post-Stroke – Full Text

Summary

Background/Objective

This study reviewed the current evidence on the effectiveness of mirror therapy (MT) on improving the motor functions of the hemiplegic lower extremity (LE) in adult clients with stroke.

Methods

A systematic review was conducted of studies published in English in the 10-year period 2005–2015, retrieved from seven electronic databases: Medline, PubMed, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Science Direct, Cochrane and TBI Rehabilitation. Only articles that focused on the effects of MT on hemiparesis affecting LE function and performance were included. The methodological quality of the studies was appraised using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro).

Results

The literature search yielded 14 studies that satisfied the selection criteria, of which five (4 randomised controlled trials and 1 case study) were reviewed after screening. Despite the heterogeneity of the studies, they showed MT to be effective in improving some of the motor functions of the LE at different stages of stroke. However, they offered little evidence on MT’s long-term effects and for when is the optimal stage to start MT after stroke onset.

Conclusion

Further research is needed to determine the best treatment regimen and optimal time to initiate MT intervention in terms of the phases of stroke. No firm conclusions can be drawn on the effectiveness of MT on the hemiplegic LE until more evidence is available.

Continue —>  Systematic Review: Effectiveness of Mirror Therapy for Lower Extremity Post-Stroke

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[ARTICLE] Usability engineering in the design and evaluation of a functional electrical stimulation system for upper limb rehabilitation – University of Salford Institutional Repository

Abstract

Chronic physical impairment of the hemiplegic upper limb (UL) is seen in an estimated 50-70% of stroke patients, who place a high priority on regaining upper limb function. Current therapy is insufficiently intensive, often not task-oriented and hence poorly aligned with the evidence base.

Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has the potential to not only increase the intensity of task-focused therapy, but also provide certain unique features, notably direct excitation of lower motor neurons. However, current FES systems are limited in their functionality and/or difficult to use. Systems are also poorly aligned to therapists’ ways of working and uptake remains limited.

To address these problems, a novel FES technology (UL FES Rehab Tool) has been developed. The control system design is reported in Sun, (2014). The aims of my thesis were to:

  • 1) design a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that would enable therapists to quickly and easily set up an individually tailored library of FES tasks for each patient;
  • 2) evaluate the usability and functionality of the UL FES Rehab Tool (software and hardware) in both laboratory (lab) and clinical settings.

An iterative, mixed methods, five-phase usability engineering approach was used to design and evaluate the UL FES Rehab Tool. Phases one to three incorporated identification of therapists’ requirements, a user ‘assisted walkthrough’ of the software with expert and novice FES users and ‘rapid prototyping’ of the full system, using healthy participants. Further usability testing of the software & hardware was conducted in phase four with 1 physiotherapist and 6 patients, (total of 24 visits), in the chronic stage post-stroke. The work demonstrated in detail, for the first time, the impact of therapist involvement in the design of novel rehabilitation technology.

To address therapists’ focus on setup time, using the phase four data set, a novel model to predict setup time was devised. This model was able to explain 51% of the variance in setup time based on two parameters, task complexity and patient impairment. Finally, in phase five, a summative usability evaluation of the final prototype was carried out in 2 sub-acute stroke units. Four therapists and 1 rehabilitation assistant used the UL FES Rehab Tool with 6 patients in the acute stage post-stroke. The UL FES Rehab Tool enabled all therapists and one therapy assistant to effectively deliver FES assisted upper limb task-oriented therapy to a range of stroke patients (Fugl-Meyer scores 8–65). The usability methods effectively captured objective and subjective feedback from therapists and patients. However the previous setup time model was unable to predict setup time, suggesting other factors were important in a clinical setting.

Although participant numbers were low, the results suggested therapists’ predisposition to using technology and post-training confidence in using the technology may influence their willingness to engage with novel rehabilitation technologies.

This study is the first to describe in detail the impact of a usability engineering approach on the design of a complex upper limb rehabilitation technology from early stage design to clinical evaluation. These methods can be generalised to other studies seeking to explore the usability of new forms of rehabilitation technologies.

Source: Usability engineering in the design and evaluation of a functional electrical stimulation system for upper limb rehabilitation – University of Salford Institutional Repository

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[ARTICLE] The effects of a progressive resistance training program on walking ability in patients after stroke: a pilot study – Full Text PDF

Abstract

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a progressive resistance training (PRT) program on the walking ability of chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke.

[Subjects and Methods] The participants of this study were fifteen hemiplegic patients. The main outcomes measured for this study were the peak torque of the knee extensor; the gait ability as measured by electric gait analysis of walking speed, walking cycle, affected side stance phase, affected side stride length, symmetry index of stance phase, and symmetry index of stride length; and 10-m walking speed; and the Berg balance scale test.

[Results] Walking speed and affected side stride length significantly increased after the PRT program, and 10-m walking time significantly decreased after RPT in stroke patients.

[Conclusion] These results suggest that the progressive resistance training program may, in part, improve the stride of the affected side leg of stroke patients after stroke and also positively impact walking speed.

Full Text PDF

Source: The effects of a progressive resistance training program on walking ability in patients after stroke: a pilot study

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To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Objective: To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke.

Method: A sample of 42 patients was recruited from the Physiotherapy Department of IPM&R and Neurology OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi through non probability purposive sampling technique. Twenty one patients were placed to each experimental and control groups. Experimental group was treated with Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) and control group was treated with motor relearning programme (MRP) for three consecutive weeks. Pre and post treatment measurements were determined by upper arm section of Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) and Self Care item of Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Scale.

Results: Intra group analysis showed statistically significant results (p-value<0.05) in all items of MAS in both groups. However, advanced hand activities item of MAS in MRP group showed insignificant result (p-value=0.059). Self-care items of FIM Scale also showed significant result (p-value< 0.05) in both groups except dressing upper body item (p-value=0.059) in CIMT group and grooming and dressing upper body items (p-value=0.059 & 0.063) in MRP group showed insignificant p-values.

Conclusion: CIMT group showed more significant improvement in motor function and self-care performance of hemiplegic upper extremity as compared to MRP group in patients with sub-acute stroke assessed by the MAS and FIM scales. Thus CIMT is proved to be more statistically significant and clinically effective intervention in comparison to motor relearning programme among the patients aged between 35-60 years. Further studies are needed to evaluate CIMT effects in acute and chronic post stroke population.

Full Text: PDF

Source: To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movementtherapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke | Batool | Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences

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[ARTICLE] Research of rehabilitation aid system by DOF constraintable mechanism and NMES for hemiplegic upper limbs

Abstract

In this paper, rehabilitation aid system by selectable DOF constraintable mechanism and NMES (Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation) for hemiplegic upper limbs was developed. By using this mechanism, it became possible to separate synergic movement while flexion-extension training of shoulder and elbow by constraining each individual joints. As the clinical trial result by using this mechanism and NMES, the shoulder-elbow UE-FMA sub-scores improved significantly.

In this research, NMES timing control system and quantitative evaluation method for sensing the flexion-extension movement of the elbow and shoulder joints are proposed.

Source: IEEE Xplore Abstract (Abstract) – Research of rehabilitation aid system by DOF constraintable mechanism and NMES for hemiplegic upper …

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[ARTICLE] Bilateral wrist robot-assisted training in chronic hemiplegic stroke: A pilot study

Abstract

Background: The stroke population needing physical rehabilitation of the upper extremity is constantly increasing. To solve this problem, robot devices for improving motor performance are developed to assist physical rehabilitation in Korea. The aim of this study was to develop the robot-assisted wrist training system and to apply this to the chronic hemiplegic stroke participants.

Methods: Bilateral wrist robotic device was developed and we applied this to four chronic hemiplegic stroke participants. Robot-assisted wrist training system was assessed by Hand grip force, Medical Research Council, Range of motion, Upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and Motor Activity Log. In addition, we measured functional magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) analysis for cortical reorganization during both hand movement. Participants received 60 min, 20 sessions, five days a week, for four consecutive weeks. The assessments were done before and after 20 training sessions

Results: Robot-assisted wrist training system was built with the bilateral wrist flexion/extension and pronation/supination performance that provides a repetitive active-active, active-passive, and passive-passive mode. Muscle strength, Motion of wrist, and motor function were enhanced after 4-week training of wrist. And the cortical activity change was associated with inducing reorganization of motor cortex networks

Conclusion: We developed bilateral wrist robotic device and robot-assisted wrist training system. Robot-assisted wrist training system showed improvement of upper limb function after training of wrist. Our system might be efficient robot-assisted wrist training for improving muscle strength, motor performance, and cortical reorganization in patients with chronic hemiplegic stroke and contribute to the development of translational research in rehabilitation robot.

via Bilateral wrist robot-assisted training in chronic hemiplegic stroke: A pilot study – New Horizons in Translational Medicine.

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