Posts Tagged impedance control

[Abstract+References] Impedance Control of a Pneumatic Muscles-Driven Ankle Rehabilitation Robot – Conference paper

Abstract

Pneumatic muscle is a new type of flexible actuator with advantages in terms of light weight, large output power/weight ratio, good security, low price and clean. In this paper, an ankle rehabilitation robot with two degrees of freedom driven by pneumatic muscle is studied. The force control method with an impedance controller in outer loop and a position inner loop is proposed. The demand of rehabilitation torque is ensured through tracking forces of three pneumatic muscle actuators. In the simulation, the constant force and variable force are tracked with error less than 10 N. In the experiment, the force control method also achieved satisfactory results, which provides a good support for the application of the robot in the ankle rehabilitation.

References

  1. 1.
    Bradley, D., et al.: NeXOS-the design, development and evaluation of a rehabilitation system for the lower limbs. Mechatronics 19(2), 247–257 (2009)MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Inoue, K.: Rubbertuators and applications for robots. In: Proceedings of the 4th IEEE International Symposium on Robotics Research, Cambridge, pp. 57–63 (1988)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Chou, C.P.: Measurement and modeling of McKibben pneumatic artificial muscle. IEEE Trans. Robot. Autom. 12(1), 90–102 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gaylord, R.H.: Fluid actuated motor system and stroking device. U.S. Patent 2238058, 22 July (1958) Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Doumit, M., Fahim, A.: Michael Munro. analytical modeling and experimental validation of the braided pneumatic muscle. IEEE Trans. Robot. 25(6), 1282–1291 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Wickramatunge, K.C., et al.: Study on mechanical behaviors of pneumatic artificial muscle. Int. J. Eng. Sci. 48(2), 188–198 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Tu, D.C.T., Ahn, K.K.: Nonlinear PID control to improve the control performance of 2 axes pneumatic artificial muscle manipulator using neural network. Mechatronics 16(9), 577–587 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Lin, C.J., Lin, C.R.: Hysteresis modeling and tracking control for a dual pneumatic artificial muscle system using Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Mechatronics 28, 35–45 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Ganguly, S., Garg, A.: Control of pneumatic artificial muscle system through experimental modeling. Mechatronics 22(8), 1135–1147 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Perez Ibarra, J.C.: Adaptive impedance control for robot-aided rehabilitation of ankle movements. In: 2014 5th IEEE RAS & EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (BioRob), São Paulo, Brazil (2014) Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Proietti, T., Crocher, V.: Upper-limb robotic exoskeletons for neurorehabilitation: a review on control strategies. IEEE Rev. Biomed. Eng. 9, 4–14 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Chen, S.H., Lien, W.M.: Assistive Control System for Upper Limb Rehabilitation Robot. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems & Rehabilitation Engineering A Publication of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society 24(11), 1199–1209 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Prashant, K.: Impedance control of an intrinsically compliant parallel ankle rehabilitation robot. IEEE Trans. Industr. Electron. 63(6), 3638–3647 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Shahid, H., Sheng, Q.: Adaptive impedance control of a robotic orthosis for gait rehabilitation. IEEE Trans. Cybern. 43(3), 1025–1034 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Meng, W., Liu, Q.: Recent development of mechanisms and control strategies for robot-assisted lower limb rehabilitation. Mechatronics 31, 132–145 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Source: Impedance Control of a Pneumatic Muscles-Driven Ankle Rehabilitation Robot | SpringerLink

, , ,

Leave a comment

[Abstract+References] Robot assisted rehabilitation of the arm after stroke: prototype design and clinical evaluation

Abstract

Robot assisted rehabilitation training is a promising tool for post-stroke patients’ recovery, and some new challenges are imposed on robot design, control, and clinical evaluation. This paper presents a novel upper limb rehabilitation robot that can provide safe and compliant force feedbacks to the patient for the benefits of its stiff and low-inertia parallel structure, highly backdrivable capstan-cable transmission, and impedance control method in the workspace. The “assist-as-needed” (AAN) clinical training principle is implemented through the “virtual tunnel” force field design, the “assistance threshold” strategy, as well as the virtual environment training games, and preliminary clinical results show its effectiveness for motor relearning for both acute and chronic stroke patients, especially for coordinated movements of shoulder and elbow.

Supplementary material

11432_2017_9076_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.7 mb)

Robot assisted rehabilitation of the arm after stroke: prototype design and clinical evaluation
11432_2017_9076_MOESM2_ESM.mp4 (96.2 mb)

Supplementary material, approximately 96.2 MB.
11432_2017_9076_MOESM3_ESM.mp4 (43.6 mb)

Supplementary material, approximately 43.6 MB.

Source: Robot assisted rehabilitation of the arm after stroke: prototype design and clinical evaluation | SpringerLink

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[Book Chapter] Control of the E2REBOT Platform for Upper Limb Rehabilitation in Patients with Neuromotor Impairment – Springer

Abstract

In this paper, the most significant aspects of the new robotic platform E2REBOT, for active assistance in rehabilitation work of the upper limbs for people with neuromotor impairment, are presented. Special emphasis is made on the characteristics of their control architecture, designed based on a three level model, one of which implements a haptic impedance controller, developed according to the “assist as needed” paradigm, looking to dynamically adjust the level of assistance to the current situation of the patient, in order to improve the results of the therapy. The two modes of therapy that supports the platform are described, highlighting the behavior of the control system in each case and describing the criteria used to adapt the behavior of the robot. Finally, we describe the ability of the system for the automatic recording of kinematic and dynamic parameters during the execution of therapies, and the availability of a management environment for exploiting these data, as a tool for supporting the rehabilitation tasks.

Source: Control of the E2REBOT Platform for Upper Limb Rehabilitation in Patients with Neuromotor Impairment – Springer

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[REVIEW] A review of technological and clinical aspects of robot-aided rehabilitation of upper-extremity after stroke – Full Text PDF

Abstract

Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or stroke is one of the leading causes of disability and loss of motor function. Millions of people around the world are effected by it each year. Stroke results in disabled arm function. Restoration of arm function is essential to regaining activities of daily living (ADL). Along with traditional rehabilitation methods, robot-aided therapy has emerged in recent years. Robot-aided rehabilitation is more intensive, of longer duration and more repetitive. Using robots, repetitive dull exercises can turn into a more challenging and motivating tasks such as games. Besides, robots can provide a quantitative measure of the rehabilitation progress. This article overviews the terms used in robot-aided upper-limb rehabilitation. It continues by investigating the requirements for rehabilitation robots. Then the most outstanding works in robot-aided upper-limb rehabilitation and their control schemes have been investigated. The clinical outcomes of the built robots are also given that demonstrates the usability of these robots in real-life applications and their acceptance. This article summarizes a review done along with a research on the design, simulation and control of a robot for use in upper-limb rehabilitation after stroke.

Get Full Text PDF

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

[ARTICLE] A review of technological and clinical aspects of robot-aided rehabilitation of upper-extremity after stroke

Abstract

Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or stroke is one of the leading causes of disability and loss of motor function. Millions of people around the world are effected by it each year. Stroke results in disabled arm function. Restoration of arm function is essential to regaining activities of daily living (ADL).

Along with traditional rehabilitation methods, robot-aided therapy has emerged in recent years. Robot-aided rehabilitation is more intensive, of longer duration and more repetitive. Using robots, repetitive dull exercises can turn into a more challenging and motivating tasks such as games. Besides, robots can provide a quantitative measure of the rehabilitation progress.

This article overviews the terms used in robot-aided upper-limb rehabilitation. It continues by investigating the requirements for rehabilitation robots. Then the most outstanding works in robot-aided upper-limb rehabilitation and their control schemes have been investigated. The clinical outcomes of the built robots are also given that demonstrates the usability of these robots in real-life applications and their acceptance. This article summarizes a review done along with a research on the design, simulation and control of a robot for use in upper-limb rehabilitation after stroke.

Implications for Rehabilitation

  • Reviewing common terms in rehabilitation of upper limb using robots
  • Reviewing rehabilitation robots built up to date
  • Reviewing clinical outcomes of the mentioned rehabilitation robots

via A review of technological and clinical aspects of robot-aided rehabilitation of upper-extremity after stroke, Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, Informa Healthcare.

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: