Posts Tagged in-home

[WEB SITE] Study shows in-home therapy effective for stroke rehabilitation

stroke

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. Credit: copyright American Heart Association

In-home rehabilitation, using a telehealth system and supervised by licensed occupational/physical therapists, is an effective means of improving arm motor status in stroke survivors, according to findings presented by University of California, Irvine neurologist Steven C. Cramer, MD, at the recent 2018 European Stroke Organisation Conference in Gothenburg, Sweden.

“Motor deficits are a major contributor to post-stroke disability, and we know that occupational and physical  improve patient outcomes in a supervised ,” said Cramer, a professor of neurology in the UCI School of Medicine. “Since many patients receive suboptimal therapy doses for reasons that include cost, availability, and difficulty with travel, we wanted to determine whether a comprehensive in-home telehealth therapy program could be as effective as in-clinic rehabilitation.”

In a study conducted at 11 U.S. sites, 124  underwent six weeks of intensive arm motor therapy, with half receiving traditional supervised in-clinic therapy and half undergoing an in-home rehabilitation program supervised via a videoconferenced telemedicine system.

Subjects were on average 61 years old, 4.5 months post-stroke, and had moderate arm motor deficits at study entry. When examined 30 days after the end of therapy, subjects in the in-clinic group improved by 8.4 points on the Fugl-Meyer scale, which measures arm motor status and ranges from 0 to 66, with higher numbers being better. Subjects in the telerehab group improved by 7.9 points, a difference that was not statistically significant.

“The current findings support the utility of a computer-based system in the home, used under the supervision of a licensed therapist, to provide clinically meaningful rehab therapy,” Cramer said. “Future applications might examine longer-term treatment, pair home-based telerehab with long-term dosing of a restorative drug, treat other neurological domains affected by stroke (such as language, memory, or gait), or expand the home treatment system to build out a smart home for stroke recovery.”

He said that the demand for rehabilitation services will likely increase, due to an aging population and increased stroke survival as a result of better access to advanced acute care. Telehealth, defined as the delivery of health-related services and information via telecommunication technologies, can potentially address this growing unmet need.

“We reasoned that telerehabilitation is ideally suited to efficiently provide a large dose of useful rehab therapy after stroke,” said Cramer, whose research team is part of the NIH StrokeNet consortium.

This research builds on the findings of a pilot study of 12 patients with late subacute  and arm-motor deficits who were provided 28 days of home-based telerehab program. The results, published in November 2017 in the journal Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, found that patient compliance was excellent (97.9%) and participants experienced significant arm-motor gains (Fugl-Meyer scale increase of 4.8 points). The study also found that patients did not need any additional computer skills training due to the design of the telerehab system.

“Getting patients to remain engaged and comply with therapy is a key measure of success of any rehabilitation program,” Cramer said. “Greater gains are associated with therapy that is challenging, motivating, accompanied by appropriate feedback, interesting and relevant. Telerehab achieves this because therapy is provided through games, provides user feedback, can be adjusted based on individual needs, is easy to use—and is fun.”

This study was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development as well as the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (grant U01 NS091951), the NIH StrokeNet Clinical Trials Network, the 11 US enrollment sites, the research team at the primary study site at the University of California, Irvine, and the patients and families who participated.

 

via Study shows in-home therapy effective for stroke rehabilitation

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[WEB SITE] Restorative Therapies, Inc., Today Announced CE Mark and Canadian Approval for the new Xcite Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) system

Restorative Therapies, Inc., advances its new era in physical therapy systems for neurological injury and paralysis with CE mark and Canadian medical device licensing of the company’s new Xcite Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) rehabilitation system.

Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) October 26, 2016

Restorative Therapies, Inc., advances its new era in physical and occupational therapy systems for neurological injury and paralysis with CE mark and Canadian medical device licensing of the company’s new Xcite Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) rehabilitation system.

Restorative Therapies is the designer of medical devices providing clinic and in-home restoration therapy. Xcite is the next in the series of FES powered therapy systems that started with the company’s hugely successful RT300 FES cycle.

FES is a physical and occupational therapy rehabilitation modality used to evoke functional movements and exercise not otherwise possible for individuals with a neurological impairment such as a spinal cord injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy.

The CE mark demonstrates that Xcite meets all the requirements of the European Medical Device Directive and facilitates its sale in numerous markets outside the USA. The Canadian medical device license provides approval to market Xcite in Canada.

The new Xcite FES system delivers up to 12 channels of electrical stimulation to nerves which activate core, leg and arm muscles. Easy to use sequenced stimulation evokes functional movement enabling a patient’s paralyzed or weak muscles to move through dynamic movement patterns and specific functional tasks.

“Xcite is a physical and occupational therapy system which provides a library of coordinated multichannel FES therapies for people with neurological impairments” said Prof. David Ditor of Brock University, in Ontario, Canada, “After being involved in the development trials we are excited to see the system obtain the CE mark and Canadian approval making the system more widely available”.

“It is the first truly practical FES rehabilitation system of this kind that I have seen. In addition to combining several valuable neuro-rehabilitation interventions, functional electrical stimulation, mass practice and neuromuscular re-education, Xcite is portable and easy enough to use that it could be used in the patient’s home,” said Prof. Susan Harkema of the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, University of Louisville. “In the context of rehabilitation influencing neural plasticity as a means for neural restoration, training in the home setting is an essential component of progress and I see Xcite as a great tool in achieving this,” concludes Harkema.

“Xcite system inherits many of the popular RT300 FES cycle’s great features including personalized muscle selection, secure Internet connectivity and physical therapy clinic ease of use.” says Andrew Barriskill, CEO of Restorative Therapies. “We are excited to have obtained CE marking and Canadian approval for this product which will allow us to market the system in Canada and many other international markets.”

Xcite is the latest result of Restorative Therapies commitment to ongoing development of FES powered therapy systems designed to help people with neurological impairments maximize their recovery potential.

About Restorative Therapies

Restorative Therapies mission is to help people with a neurological impairment or in critical care achieve their full recovery potential. Restorative Therapies combines activity-based physical therapy and Functional Electrical Stimulation as a rehabilitation therapy for immobility associated with paralysis such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury or for patients in critical care

Restorative Therapies is a privately held company headquartered in Baltimore.

To learn more about Restorative Therapies please visit us at http://www.restorative-therapies.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/restorative.therapies.inc

Twitter: @rtifes

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/restothera

Contact:

Judy Kline, Director of Sales and Marketing

Phone: 800 6099166 x301

E-mail: jkline(at)restorative-therapies.com

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/10/prweb13789606.htm

Source: Restorative Therapies, Inc., Today Announced CE Mark and Canadian Approval for the new Xcite Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) system – Press Release Rocket

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