Posts Tagged interactive rehabilitation

[Abstract + References] A Scoping Study on the Development of an Interactive Upper-Limb Rehabilitation System Framework for Patients with Stroke – Conference paper

Abstract

This study aims to propose the framework of the interactive upper-limb rehabilitation system with brain-computer interfaces. The system mainly includes an interactive rehabilitation training platform, a rehabilitation database system, and an EEG and EMG acquisition system. The interactive rehabilitation training system platform includes a virtual rehabilitation game system and an interactive upper-limb rehabilitation device by which a user can perform proactive and reactive rehabilitation.

References

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[Abstract] Virtual reality gaming in the rehabilitation of the upper extremities post-stroke. 

Abstract

Background: Occurrences of strokes often result in unilateral upper limb dysfunction. Dysfunctions of this nature frequently persist and can present chronic limitations to activities of daily living.
Methods: Research into applying virtual reality gaming systems to provide rehabilitation therapy have seen resurgence. Themes explored in stroke rehab for paretic limbs are action observation and imitation, versatility, intensity and repetition and preservation of gains. Fifteen articles were ultimately selected for review. The purpose of this literature review is to compare the various virtual reality gaming modalities in the current literature and ascertain their efficacy.
Results: The literature supports the use of virtual reality gaming rehab therapy as equivalent to traditional therapies or as successful augmentation to those therapies. While some degree of rigor was displayed in the literature, small sample sizes, variation in study lengths and therapy durations and unequal controls reduce generalizability and comparability.
Conclusions: Future studies should incorporate larger sample sizes and post-intervention follow-up measures.

Source: Virtual reality gaming in the rehabilitation of the upper extremities post-stroke – Brain Injury | Taylor & Francis Online

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[Abstract] Virtual reality gaming in the rehabilitation of the upper extremities post-stroke.

Abstract

Background: Occurrences of strokes often result in unilateral upper limb dysfunction. Dysfunctions of this nature frequently persist and can present chronic limitations to activities of daily living.
Methods: Research into applying virtual reality gaming systems to provide rehabilitation therapy have seen resurgence. Themes explored in stroke rehab for paretic limbs are action observation and imitation, versatility, intensity and repetition and preservation of gains. Fifteen articles were ultimately selected for review. The purpose of this literature review is to compare the various virtual reality gaming modalities in the current literature and ascertain their efficacy.
Results: The literature supports the use of virtual reality gaming rehab therapy as equivalent to traditional therapies or as successful augmentation to those therapies. While some degree of rigor was displayed in the literature, small sample sizes, variation in study lengths and therapy durations and unequal controls reduce generalizability and comparability.
Conclusions: Future studies should incorporate larger sample sizes and post-intervention follow-up measures.

Source: Virtual reality gaming in the rehabilitation of the upper extremities post-stroke – Brain Injury | Taylor & Francis Online

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